Page 1 of 17 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 246

Thread: Proposed Jets Stadium on West Side

  1. #1

    Default Proposed Jets Stadium on West Side

    Daily News...

    Mayor carrying a torch for new W. Side stadium

    By MICHAEL SAUL

    Olympics or no Olympics - Mayor Bloomberg still believes a new stadium on Manhattan's West Side could be built.

    Bloomberg, who leaves for Colorado Springs tomorrow to deliver the city's final pitch for the 2012 Summer Games, said he favors a massive expansion of the Javits Center complex.

    "Our ability to attract conventions here is declining precipitously, and it's a very big worry for us. There are so many jobs involved," Bloomberg said.

    "What the actual nature of that would be and whether it would be used for football eight Sundays a year ... it will be part of the Javits Center. And we need to do that regardless."

    The U.S. Olympic Committee will choose New York or San Francisco as its nominee on Saturday. The International Olympic Committee will choose the host city in 2005.

    NYC2012, the group pursuing the Olympic Games on the city's behalf, has proposed building an Olympic stadium as part of an expanded convention center.

    The development of the "West Side Olympic complex" has already begun with the multimillion-dollar commitment to design the extension of the No. 7 subway train, which would serve the area and the proposed Olympic stadium.

    Deputy Mayor Daniel Doctoroff, NYC2012's founder, told the Daily News yesterday that construction of the subway extension will begin by mid-2005, regardless of the city's Olympic quest.

    Officials with the New York Jets are eager to build a stadium at the West Side site and have talked to the city about how it might be funded. Yesterday, at the NFL owners meeting, the Jets gave a presentation about sponsoring a Super Bowl here.


    But not everyone welcomes a West Side stadium. The Clinton Special District Coalition released a document yesterday detailing why a new stadium would hurt the city.

    According to the group, a stadium would lead to more than $5 billion in new taxes, a delay or termination of the Second Ave. subway project and further congestion on Manhattan streets.

    Doctoroff dismissed the criticism, saying the area surrounding the convention center has suffered from decades of "no development whatsoever."

    "It's a wasteland," he said. "There is no there there. It is Manhattan's last frontier."

    Meanwhile, the state Olympic Games Commission announced it will sponsor a reception Saturday at the World Financial Center's Winter Garden for various officials and special guests to watch the announcement.

    And what if New York loses?

    Jennifer Farina, a spokeswoman for Gov. Pataki, exuded confidence. "There is no possibility of that happening," she said.

  2. #2

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    NY Times...

    In the Excitement of an Olympic Bid, a $1 Billion Stadium

    By CHARLES V. BAGLI

    COLORADO SPRINGS, Nov. 3 — The latest proposal for an Olympic stadium, a striking glass and steel structure that would sweep down to the edge of the Hudson River, was unveiled Saturday before New York won its bid to be the United States nominee to serve as host city for the 2012 Summer Games.

    The billion-dollar stadium complex, to be built above the West Side rail yards in Manhattan, was described to the United States Olympic Committee here by Daniel L. Doctoroff, founder of New York's bid committee, as the most environmentally advanced in the world. It is also the single most controversial element of the New York City bid's $5 billion proposal for new parks, sports complexes, subways and housing.

    "The big question mark is the Olympic stadium," said Richard T. Anderson, the president of the New York Building Congress, a trade group that supports the Olympic bid. "The good news is that we can build anything. The real question is political: Is there the political will and public consensus to do it?"

    The stadium is opposed by neighborhood groups and the local community board and will almost certainly need an extensive environmental review. Mr. Doctoroff said the 86,000-seat stadium would be paid for largely by the Jets and the National Football League (it would become the Jets' home after the Summer Games end). But under the proposal, taxpayers would pay $500 million or more for a retractable roof and a platform to build the stadium over the rail yards, between 30th and 34th Streets and 11th and 12th Avenues.

    "The New York Jets' own study predicts 10,000 more cars in gridlocked Manhattan," said John Fisher, president of the Clinton Special District Coalition, which opposes the plan. "A stadium in Queens would likely cost about one-third as much as one in Manhattan and it would be closer to the team's fan base. Just when Lower Manhattan needs help and the city is scrambling to pay for its firefighters, Mayor Bloomberg and Doctoroff are pushing this boondoggle just for a little glory."

    The city's bid committee, NYC2012, does have a backup plan to put the stadium in Flushing, Queens, but Mr. Doctoroff, who is the city's deputy mayor for economic development, dismissed many of the criticisms. He said the stadium would enliven what many people see as a largely barren neighborhood and raise the possibility that the Super Bowl might be held in New York City. The stadium itself, he said, would normally be used for 10 football games a year, on Sundays, when traffic congestion is at its lowest.

    The proposal unveiled in Colorado Springs is actually the latest commissioned by L. Jay Cross, president of the Jets, who was part of the New York delegation to the United States Olympic Committee's national meeting this weekend. Mr. Cross has been quietly showing the designs to state and city officials since the spring, and more recently to real estate developers and others. But in deference to the politically charged nature of the proposal, state officials had urged him not to show it publicly until after Election Day on Tuesday.

    On Saturday, Mr. Cross declined to discuss details of the stadium.

    The original proposal described a venue that would be used for the opening and closing ceremonies of the Games, as well as for track and field events. The stadium would then serve as both a home for the Jets, which now share a stadium in the New Jersey Meadowlands with the Giants, and as an expansion of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, just to the north of the rail yards.

    But the chairman of the Javits Center, Robert E. Boyle, said he would not consider the stadium a substitute for what he contends is a badly needed expansion of the convention hall. He favored extending the Javits north to 42nd Street, rather than south to the stadium.

    So Mr. Cross went back to the drawing board. He largely abandoned the notion that the stadium would become an addition to the Javits Center, although the latest plan does show an underground connection to the center, which would allow the stadium to be used occasionally for events like boat shows.

    Mr. Cross also came up with a new look for the stadium, with a nearly transparent exoskeleton of glass and steel and wind turbines and solar panels to provide power. According to people who have seen the plans, the basic stadium (without the platform it would be built on) would cost about $800 million. The Jets and the N.F.L. have told city officials that they would put up more than $400 million toward the cost; they presumably would borrow the rest.

    But Mr. Cross's most elaborate plans call for the building to be used, at separate times, as both a 75,000-seat football stadium and a new Madison Square Garden, which could seat 23,000 for basketball and hockey. He has had promising talks with Cablevision, which owns Madison Square Garden, according to several people familiar with the talks.


    Cablevision, however, has told city and state officials that it thinks the property tax exemption that Madison Square Garden received in 1985 would remain in place if it moved to the rail yards. Under that exemption, the city has foregone more than $100 million in taxes, even though the Knicks and the Rangers are among the most valuable franchises in their respective sports.

    Many residents of the area around the convention center say they are resigned to its expansion, but remain opposed to a stadium, Olympic or otherwise.

    "We are not against the Olympics," said Simone Sindin, chairwoman of Community Board 4, "but we are against the siting of the stadium in Manhattan."

  3. #3

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    NY Post...


    W. SIDE TEEMS WITH TEAMS

    By FRANKIE EDOZIEN, KENNETH LOVETT and IKIMULISA SOCKWELL-MASON

    The proposed $1.6 billion West Side Stadium could become home to not just the New York Jets, but to the Rangers and Knicks as well, it was revealed yesterday.

    David Cornstein, chairman of the New York State Olympic Commission, told The Post that Gov. Pataki isn't sold on building a stadium solely for the Jets, and that the proposal is more ambitious.

    "I know the governor feels strongly about this. You cannot build a stadium for 10 days a year," he said. He described a world-class "tri-sport arena" where football, basketball, hockey and concerts would reign supreme year round.

    The revelation came a day after the city won the bid to be the U.S. candidate for hosting the 2012 Summer Olympics.

    It had previously been thought that after anchoring the Olympics, a new stadium would serve only as a home for the Jets and an extension of the Javits Convention Center.

    "This stadium needs something beyond 10 football games a year. It needs a partner . . . one could be a new Madison Square Garden," Cornstein said.

    Among the plans percolating around the stadium idea are: a $1.5 billion transit hub including the extension of the No. 7 train, a $1 billion expansion of Javits and a $229 million Olympic park.

    The total tally is estimated at $6.5 billion.

    "There's no question in my mind that we'll have the support from the private sector and from others to make sure that if we're chosen as the final designee . . . we'll do it well," Pataki said at a Brooklyn campaign stop.

    A bulk of the funding of the project is to come from the sale of bonds, including a $1.5 billion transit bond backed by the promise of increased tax collections on future developments in the area. Cornstein said a goal was for the projects to be done with zero taxpayer dollars.

    Still, many are not sold.

    "I think the idea of West Side stadium is a bad idea," said Councilwoman Christine Quinn (D-Manhattan). She said similar projects have turned out to be "municipal flops."

    Mayor Bloomberg said the plans - including the stadium - were not subject to change and include improvements the city needs anyway.

    "We didn't just have a p.r. thing [for the Olympics]. We actually put together a plan of how we would do it," he said.

    James Sanders (D-Queens) chairman of the City Council's Economic Development Committee, said the needs of New Yorkers are important.

    "The council will step up to the plate and ensure sustainable development," he said.

  4. #4
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Manhattan - South Village
    Posts
    4,240

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    As a Giants fan I am jealous the Jets will have a brand new stadium in Manhattan, but of course I'm all for it. It's high time that New York starts competing again with smaller cities for our country's major sporting events.

  5. #5

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    At Saturday's Olympic Comitee decision, a rendering of the new Jets Stadium was shown for the very first time. I would love to see it, if anyone could get a hold of it. Its a KPF design, and from what I hear spectacular.

  6. #6

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    Quote: from Stern on 11:56 am on Nov. 4, 2002
    a rendering of the new Jets Stadium was shown for the very first time. I would love to see it, if anyone could get a hold of it. Its a KPF design, and from what I hear spectacular.
    The proposal unveiled in Colorado Springs is actually the latest commissioned by L. Jay Cross, president of the Jets, who was part of the New York delegation to the United States Olympic Committee's national meeting this weekend. Mr. Cross has been quietly showing the designs to state and city officials since the spring, and more recently to real estate developers and others. But in deference to the politically charged nature of the proposal, state officials had urged him not to show it publicly until after Election Day on Tuesday.

    We should be seeing it real soon...

  7. #7

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    Newsday...


    Olympic Foes Fighting On

    By Bryan Virasami

    Civic activists in Queens and Manhattan are vowing to intensify their efforts to keep the 2012 Summer Olympics out of New York unless the city scraps plans for a West Side stadium and major alterations to Flushing Meadows-Corona Park.

    West Side civic groups said opposition to the games will be stronger in light of Mayor Michael Bloomberg's newly announced support for a stadium over the West Side rail yards even if the city fails to win the 2012 Summer Games.

    "There's absolutely no need for a stadium being in that area," said Robert Trentlyon of Community Board 4 in Manhattan. "I understand putting a stadium in places where you need it for economic development but that's not necessary for the West Side."

    Maria Garcia of the Chelsea Owners and Tenants for Neighborhood Preservation said many people now oppose the 2012 Summer Games altogether - not just the stadium.

    "The mayor is going to have a real fight on his hands," Garcia said.

    On Saturday, the U.S. Olympic Committee voted to back New York City as its candidate to host the 2012 Olympic Games.

    The decision means New York will have to compete against several foreign cities to host the games. A final decision will be made in 2005.

    While many civic groups are behind the mayor's efforts to bring the games to New York for its potential economic benefits, opponents are marshaling their arguments, citing potential traffic, environmental consequences, terrorism concerns and costs.

    While community boards in Flushing and Astoria are overwhelmingly in favor of having Flushing Meadows-Corona Park host rowing, canoeing, tennis, swimming and other events, some activists in Queens read only bad news in the glossy NYC2012 brochures.

    Patricia Dolan, president of the Kew Gardens Hills Civic Association, is skeptical that the new construction will benefit residents of the borough.

    Some of the plans for Flushing Meadows-Corona Park call for the merging of the two man-made lakes, new soccer fields and a new whitewater rafting facility.

    "They [will] come in here and rip the heart out of our park and 17 days later they will pack up and go back to Manhattan," Dolan said.

    Asked after Saturday's win about community opposition to the Olympics, Bloomberg downplayed its significance.

    "Our objective is to get every single New Yorker to sign on to this and in the end I think we will have 99.9 percent on board," he said.

    John Fisher, president of the Clinton Special District Coalition, which represents 34th to 59th streets, said NYC2012 and the mayor are downplaying the real financial cost.

    "Nobody has a problem with athletes," Fisher said. "But that's not what we're talking about. It's team real estate, not team New York."

    Queens Borough President Helen Marshall said she is jubilant about Saturday's decision but is concerned about how long the park would be closed for repairs.

    In addition, she has asked organizers to make sure that the 4,400 apartment units in the planned Olympic Village in Long Island City would be affordable for middle-income New Yorkers.

  8. #8

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    Don't New Yorkers see the benefits of the Olympics??? *The very fact that New York would actually be building on a large scale and making drastic improvements outweighs the "inconvencies" of the Olympics. *The Olympics will force New York to make drastic improvements. *New York will have to build new subway lines and enhance thier existing lines. *New York will have to make better connections between the buroughs, which benefits everyone in the city, and Long Island. *New York will tremendously improve their athletic facilities, including the construction of new stadium that would house the Jets, so its not like its going to waster. *Also, the Jacob Javitz convention center would be expanded,w hich would help the West Side Area, and bring in more conventions to the City. *I am sure that the city would also invest in new parks and recreation sites with all their refurbishing too. *Finally, an Olympic Village at Queens West would be the first step to the development of Long Island City. *How nice would it be fore the city to stop losting jobs to jersey city and Hoboken. *Those same companies could not go across the East River to Long Island City. *

  9. #9

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    ok, but dont you start complaining when it costs 3.50 to ride the subway and your paying 15% more in income taxes. *It will be privately funded, ok, then we need 1000 companies each to give 6 million each...nyc is in a huge hole right now, where is 5-7 billion going to come from to build all these things, some projects which be useless (canoeing and rowing facility?) when the olympics leave

  10. #10

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    Quote: from Evan on 11:33 am on Nov. 5, 2002
    Don't New Yorkers see the benefits of the Olympics??? *The very fact that New York would actually be building on a large scale and making drastic improvements outweighs the "inconvencies" of the Olympics. *
    Are you serious? *You can't use logic and common sense to argue with NIMBY'S, who's only response to any kind of change, be it positive or negative, is "NIMBY!" *They have a proud tradition of whining about anything and everything. *Just look at the guy I hilighted in the last article.... "I understand putting a stadium in places where you need it for economic development but that's not necessary for the West Side.".....his statement alone is enough not to take these nuts seriously. *Have you ever seen the West Side?

  11. #11
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Manhattan - South Village
    Posts
    4,240

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    And unfortunately these NIMBYs are giving the impression that that's the attitude of New Yorkers.

  12. #12

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    Quote: from NYguy on 3:09 pm on Nov. 5, 2002
    Quote: from Evan on 11:33 am on Nov. 5, 2002
    Don't New Yorkers see the benefits of the Olympics??? *The very fact that New York would actually be building on a large scale and making drastic improvements outweighs the "inconvencies" of the Olympics. *
    Are you serious? *You can't use logic and common sense to argue with NIMBY'S, who's only response to any kind of change, be it positive or negative, is "NIMBY!" *They have a proud tradition of whining about anything and everything. *Just look at the guy I hilighted in the last article.... "I understand putting a stadium in places where you need it for economic development but that's not necessary for the West Side.".....his statement alone is enough not to take these nuts seriously. *Have you ever seen the West Side?
    LOL. *What I don't understand is that if these NIMBY's are opposed to change, development, improvement, why don't they move the suburbs. *They can then live in an area where the tallest structures are the phone lines. *

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    NYC - Hoboken
    Posts
    269

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    Because moving to the suburbs would also be a change! *
    NIMBY's are partially a by-product of the "everyone is a victim" culture that the media and some politicians helped create in our country today. *What rational, well balanced person would complain about the investment of billions of dollars into the redevelopment of their neighborhood that today is marginally better than trash? *I mean seriously, if they are home owners then their property values will go thru the roof, transportation will improve by leaps and bounds, even the schools in the neighborhood would improve over time. *
    These people are living in the center of the capitalist world but want everything to stop changing around them. *This is not a very mature or realistic viewpoint. *Their neighborhood will change, whether it happens from the Olympic bid or in 20 years from now, it will change and there is nothing they can do to stop the hands of time. *Luckily for them it will happen within the next 10 years and they will all get to benefit from this change (this reminds me of my parents making me eat my vegetables).

  14. #14

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    How bout they build the Mets a new stadium, and share it with the Jets?

  15. #15

    Default Bloomberg: *new stadium for Manhattan's Westside

    Quote: from Stern on 5:35 pm on Nov. 5, 2002
    How bout they build the Mets a new stadium, and share it with the Jets?
    I thought that the Mets were getting a new stadium that would be built in the parking lot of Shea. *

Page 1 of 17 1234511 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Fading Into History: The Jewish Lower East Side
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: September 8th, 2014, 09:44 PM
  2. Lower East Side Tenement Museum fights for expansion
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: August 6th, 2010, 06:38 PM
  3. Hotel On Rivington - 107 Rivington Street - Lower East Side
    By Kris in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: October 12th, 2004, 12:19 PM
  4. Financing Plan Adds Complexity to Remaking of West Side
    By Fabb in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: March 11th, 2003, 05:55 AM
  5. Rich and Poor, Side by Side
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: March 5th, 2003, 07:11 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software