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Thread: 7 World Trade Center - by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill

  1. #511

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  2. #512
    Senior Member
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    *Orgasms*

  3. #513

  4. #514

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    I see, so that is how they get those buggers up there. Cool little video.

  5. #515

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    It actually looks pretty good now

  6. #516

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    OCT 10
    Reflection of the clouds...







    Old meets new...


  7. #517
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    NY1

    7 World Trade Center Set To Be "Topped Out"

    Seven World Trade Center was the last building to collapse September 11th, but it is the first to be rebuilt.

    On Thursday, the 52-story skyscraper will be "topped out" – one month ahead of schedule and just 10 months after the first steel beam for the tenant floors went into place.

    "It will be the first building rebuilt to show we are back stronger than ever in Lower Manhattan," said Governor George Pataki last December.

    All of the major rebuilding players are expected to be in attendance to see the final steel beam ceremoniously raised into position. The new building is the vision of architect David Childs and is 5 stories taller than its predecessor.

    The first ten floors are occupied by a Con Edison substation that provides power for the site and parts of Lower Manhattan. The tenant floors begin on the 11th floor.

    Although the building is expected to be complete by next year, an anchor tenant has not signed on the dotted line. Developer Larry Silverstein says he is not worried.

    "We are talking now to a number of tenants," said Silverstein. "Now that the building is clearly happening and people begin to realize that this is going to be a fete accompli, and that it's a major and a significant building, the level of activity has increased significantly, which is very gratifying."

    The new "7" is across the street from where the Freedom Tower will eventually rise. According to the developer, the two office towers will share sophisticated design features that will make the buildings safer.

    "The life safety enhancements that we are building into Seven will be included in the Freedom Tower and in every one of the buildings to be built at the Trade Center," said Silverstein. "That's crucially important and considering what we learned on 9/11 that is the only way we would rebuild the Trade Center."

    Some of those safety features include a two-foot concrete core that surrounds the elevator shafts and fire stairs. And those stairs are five and a half feet wide, with landings deep enough to fit a person in a wheelchair while keeping the flow of foot traffic moving.

    It's a sign that some of the lessons learned will hopefully make the site a safer place.

    – John Schiumo

  8. #518
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    I saw 7 in person today, and I have to say that it is really beautiful - the acute angle is more dramatic than in photos, and the glass is perfect. Much better than the renderings...

  9. #519

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    7 WTC, Woolworth Building, "Brooklyn Service" tugboat, and the Brooklyn Bridge. 16 October 2004.


  10. #520

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    New York Times
    October 21, 2004

    PUBLIC LIVES

    A Skyscraper That Had to Be Built Twice

    By ROBIN FINN


    "The first time I built 7 World Trade, I thought it would last a lifetime and a day." Elio Cettina

    Clearly the star-in-residence at the Tishman Construction Corporation trailer hunkered alongside the steel skeleton of 7 World Trade Center, the first skyscraper to redefine the horizon at ground zero, Elio Cettina, the boss of this and other major Tishman projects, trades his blue hard hat for a blue dress shirt at day's end. The hat goes on a shelf with others, some blue, some white. His pen and eyeglasses are shoved into a shirt pocket.

    "Goodbye to you, Babalu," he says, paternally, to a departing colleague, and then, just as paternally, offers a visitor a sample of the trailer's amenities: a functional office chair, the portable toilet down the hall, some stale coffee?

    If he's tired, it doesn't show. He's 63, but his energy level skews young. After a day building skyscrapers, he's likely to spend the evening at home in his basement shop, building furniture. He once restored a 1959 Morgan convertible he found junked in the backyard of a home he and his wife had bought in Bergen County; built a garage for it, too. Mr. Cettina doesn't merely tinker, he constructs.

    This season, he's a builder on a momentous roll. Now that 7 World Trade Center has reached its full height, an occasion to be celebrated today with a topping-out ceremony, he can concentrate on the excavation for the Freedom Tower's foundation. Like 7 W.T.C., it will have an indestructible - he hopes - cement core.

    "I love skyscrapers," he says, "because they challenge your ability to think big." When he builds them on time and on budget, he likes them even more. He keeps his mouth shut about aesthetics: "I have been called insensitive to color and design. Whether I like it, I don't like it, I build it just the same."

    Mr. Cettina doesn't wear a white hard hat, despite his status as a Tishman vice president of field operations and general superintendent. Asked to decode his job titles, he hands over a business card and instead decodes the hard-hat hierarchy. "White is for V.I.P.'s," he explains with a dismissive wave of his sizable fist, his English granted extra gusto by an Italian accent that has stuck by him since he left Bologna for Hoboken, N.J., at age 14.

    "I've worn a blue hat here 37 years,'' he says. "I associate with my people. I can be a little boisterous. I need to operate in a different environment than the executives. Here in the trailer, I'm the boss. You do it my way or the right way." That they are the same is implicit.
    Sure, he loves his long-term boss, the Tishman family, but not enough to install himself at corporate headquarters, at 666 Fifth Avenue. Mr. Cettina, the son of a union carpenter and a garment district seamstress, attended the Newark College of Engineering and boasts of having veins that pulse with brick, concrete, steel and mortar. And a little salt water: he is a sea captain's grandson, hence his captain's license and the fishing boat moored on the Manasquan River near his home in Brielle, N.J. He cuts his own bait and cleans his own fish. Construction sites, not conference rooms, are his natural habitat.

    "Every building needs to be built" is his basic philosophy, though if he has to choose, his favorite is the one he renovated, the New Amsterdam Theater, a Times Square landmark. The gargoyles were a hoot, the moldings a challenge.

    But 7 World Trade Center is the only skyscraper he's built twice. Not the mushy type, he admits he cried when, in a coda to a horrific day, the building, evacuated and devastated by fire, shuddered and crumpled, hours after the twin towers fell on Sept. 11, 2001. He was on the roof at a Tishman job in Midtown and could scarcely comprehend the desecration he saw unfolding downtown. "The first time I built 7 World Trade, I thought it would last a lifetime and a day," he says.

    Mr. Cettina's "people" number 600 on the site of the new 7 World Trade Center, and because they are a competent crew and he is a demanding taskmaster, the topping out of the skyscraper - the positioning of the final steel beam on the 52nd story - is taking place as originally, and optimistically, scheduled.

    "Politics dictated that certain things had to happen at certain times, and we set out to make sure they did," he says. "I had wanted to come back down here in the worst way, and when Tishman got the contract, nobody was happier than me." No qualms about building something he'd already built? Mr. Cettina, whose two sons work for the Tishmans after receiving college tuition assistance from them, is not bothered by déjà vu. "I do this for a living," he says. "Wanting to rebuild was automatic."

    First came the groundbreaking in November 2003, then the activation of the Con Ed substation in the skyscraper's base, and now, 15,000 tons of steel later, the target date for the topping out ceremony has been met. "We set ourselves a schedule that was difficult but doable," he says. "There was a lot of resolve and resolution from the trades. Nobody gave up. Nobody begged off. This building is a symbol."

    Mr. Cettina is positive that the new 7 World Trade Center is the safest skyscraper ever to poke its nose up into the cityscape: "It's a building within a building," he says of its reinforced concrete core and steel frame. "There is no stronger or better way to build a building. This one will last two lifetimes and a day." A heady prediction, but he can't help himself.

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  11. #521

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    NEWSDAY




    The last I beam is hoisted to the top of 7 World Trade Center Thursday, October 21, 2004, during the topping off ceremony in lower Manhattan.




    Construction workers applaud as the last I beam is hoisted to the top of 7 World Trade Center Thursday, October 21, 2004, at the topping off ceremony in lower Manhattan.






    Construction workers lean against the final steel beam before it is lifted into place at a topping out ceremony to mark completion of steel erection for 7 World Trade Center October 21, 2004 in New York City. The 52-story building is five stories taller than the original 7 World Trade Center which was destroyed in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.




    Mayor Michael Bloomberg (L) and New York Governor George Pataki look on with construction workers at a topping out ceremony to mark completion of steel erection for 7 World Trade Center October 21, 2004 in New York City. The 52-story building is five stories taller than the original 7 World Trade Center




    L-R) Silverstein Properties President Larry Silverstein, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Silverstein Properties Vice President John Klein watch as the final steel beam is lifted into place at a topping out ceremony to mark completion of steel erection for 7 World Trade Center October 21, 2004 in New York City.




    Mayor Michael Bloomberg watches with construction workers as the final steel beam is lifted into place at a topping out ceremony to mark completion of steel erection for 7 World Trade Center October 21, 2004 in New York City.




    A makeshift memorial to a deceased firefighter is seen after the topping out ceremony to mark completion of steel erection for 7 World Trade Center (R) October 21, 2004 in New York City.




    Mayor Michael Bloomberg with construction workers as the final steel beam is lifted into place at a topping out ceremony to mark completion of steel erection for 7 World Trade Center

  12. #522

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    NY1
    October 21, 2004

    Seven World Trade Center "Topped Out" Ahead Of Schedule



    Seven World Trade Center was the last building to collapse September 11, 2001, but it is the first to be rebuilt.

    In a ceremony on Thursday, the 52-story skyscraper was "topped out" one month ahead of schedule and just 10 months after the first steel beam for the tenant floors went into place.

    All of the major rebuilding players, including Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Governor George Pataki, and hundreds of construction workers were in attendance to see the final steel beam ceremoniously raised into position.

    “This is an important day - it is more than a symbolic day,” said Pataki. “It is New York coming together to keep our word and to keep our pledge to those we lost on September 11, and to those who wondered on and after September 11, could New York come back? Were we going to rise from the ashes? Could we get beyond the sorrow and the pain? The answer is, exuberantly, yes."

    “We lost the first one and now we’re all proud to rebuild the second one," said one of the workers.

    “It’s been nice to be part of it,” said another worker. “I’ve been down here since the event happened, and to see that we're beginning life again and we're going on is nice."

    The new building, which was designed by architect David Childs, is five stories taller than its predecessor but is skinnier. The first ten floors will be occupied by a Con Edison substation that provides power for the trade center site and parts of Lower Manhattan. The tenant floors begin on the 11th.

    Although the building is expected to be complete by next year, an anchor tenant has not signed on the dotted line. Developer Larry Silverstein says he is not worried.

    "We are talking now to a number of tenants," said Silverstein. "Now that the building is clearly happening and people begin to realize that this is going to be a fete accompli, and that it's a major and a significant building, the level of activity has increased significantly, which is very gratifying."

    The new skyscraper is across the street from where the Freedom Tower will eventually rise. According to the developer, the two office towers will share sophisticated design features that will make the buildings safer.

    "The life safety enhancements that we are building into Seven will be included in the Freedom Tower and in every one of the buildings to be built at the Trade Center," said Silverstein. "That's crucially important and considering what we learned on 9/11 that is the only way we would rebuild the Trade Center."

    Some of those safety features include a two-foot concrete core that surrounds the elevator shafts and fire stairs. Those stairs are five and a half feet wide, with landings deep enough to fit a person in a wheelchair, while at the same time keeping the flow of foot traffic moving.

    It's a sign that some of the lessons learned will hopefully make the site a safer place.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    World Trade Center developer Larry Silverstein will sit down for an interview with NY1’s John Schiumo on “New York Tonight” at 8 p.m. Thursday

    Copyright © 2004 NY1 News

  13. #523

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    I wish they could hoist up some tenants.

    So far, it's turned out better than I expected. It gets your attention, but doesn't shout. A big improvement over its predecessor.

  14. #524

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    Agreed.. I pass by 7 WTC everyday and it looks better and better..

  15. #525
    Senior Member DougGold's Avatar
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    Have there been any plans released for the little triangular park that's going next to it?

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