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Thread: 7 World Trade Center - by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill

  1. #1246

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    The new streetlamps in these photos are also going up all along Broadway, from City Hall to the Battery. I like them- are they to be restricted to Lower Manhattan alone, or become the new city standard?

  2. #1247

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    There was a piece in the NY Times about them a few years ago. I believe they are paid for by the Downtown Alliance.

  3. #1248

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    Quote Originally Posted by czsz
    The new streetlamps in these photos are also going up all along Broadway, from City Hall to the Battery. I like them- are they to be restricted to Lower Manhattan alone, or become the new city standard?
    There are new designs for the city.

    City Lights Design Competition

  4. #1249

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    so does that mean the 1920's replicas will be replaced around city hall. i like those better than the new ones. but around wtc its ok

  5. #1250
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Historic / Landmark Districts tend to use "historic" style lamp-posts, so those around City Hall will most likely not be replaced (they were installed after renovation of City Hall Park in the late 90s).

    I believe the new versions that were the result of the competition are meant to replace the "Cobra" style lamps that have generally been installed around the city since the 1960s.

  6. #1251

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    thanks i appreciate the info.

  7. #1252

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    here we go ...

    7 World Trade Center Gets a Major Tenant

    By CHARLES V. BAGLI

    Published: June 20, 2006

    The developer Larry A. Silverstein has named a major tenant for 7 World Trade Center, the first skyscraper built in Lower Manhattan since the 9/11 attack, according to two real estate executives who have been briefed on the deal.

    Moody's Investors Service, the financial rating agency, signed a letter of intent on Friday to occupy 15 floors in the 52-story tower, which officially opened in May. Moody's, the executives said, plans to sell its cramped 55-year-old headquarters a few blocks away at 99 Church Street.

    The move bodes well for both Mr. Silverstein and the downtown real estate market, which has suffered a high vacancy rate since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Developers usually find a deal with an anchor tenant before beginning construction. But Mr. Silverstein built the $700 million glass and stainless steel tower largely with insurance money and tax-free Liberty bonds, so he could afford to wait for the right tenant.

    Until the deal with Moody's, Mr. Silverstein had been able to attract only a handful of tenants for eight floors. He also held out for a premium rent downtown.

    But in recent months, real estate brokers say, skyrocketing rents in Midtown and a dearth of large blocks of space are prompting tenants to look downtown, where rents are 30 percent less than in Midtown.

    Moody's decision to move into 600,000 square feet at 7 World Trade Center reflects a growing confidence in Lower Manhattan, the brokers said.

    Howard J. Rubenstein, a spokesman for Mr. Silverstein, said he was unable to reach the developer last night for comment.

    Aside from getting a more modern headquarters, Moody's would also reap a long list of tax breaks, rent rebates and other incentives offered by state and city officials to reduce the rent by as much as 10 dollars per square foot annually.

    The original tower at 7 World Trade Center was destroyed in the attack on Sept 11. Mr. Silverstein began rebuilding the tower, which sits at the corner of Vesey and Greenwich Streets, in 2002.

    Ameriprise Financial has leased half a floor in the building and the New York Academy of Sciences has taken an entire floor, as has Silverstein Properties. Mr. Silverstein also has a tentative deal with Vantone Real Estate, a Chinese company, for the top four floors.

    Across Vesey Street, work is beginning on the 1,776-foot-tall Freedom Tower, the first of five buildings at the trade center site, and Goldman Sachs is building a million-square-foot headquarters on West Street.

  8. #1253
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    That's great news.

    I just hope Moody's old building won't turn into more condos. Hopefully, the new owner can refurbish it into class A offices.

  9. #1254
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    actually there building is kinda old and is ready for a major update, im surprised Moody's has stayed there for so long. WE will see if this term sheet and the Chinese term sheet become a actual lease.

    Also a to major financial firms are looking at 7 as a possible place to establish a LM office to reap the tax breaks.

    Plus things are rolling good on neg on Building three and four in terms of tenants, now Building Two needs someone
    Last edited by kliq6; June 20th, 2006 at 04:49 PM.

  10. #1255

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    'Seven' knows its place
    Ground Zero's $700M tower - a marvel of craftsmanship - craves no limelight
    BY JUSTIN DAVIDSON
    Newsday Staff Writer

    June 28, 2006

    From the 52nd floor of 7 World Trade Center, Ground Zero looks orderly and swept, ready to receive a big delivery of architecture. Two massive squares have been marked off in the soil: archeological traces of the Twin Towers and a portent of their memorial.

    David Childs, the architect of developer Larry Silverstein's new office tower, stands at the floor-to-ceiling window and, like some delusional tour guide, points out the elements of a nonexistent cityscape. "The PATH station's there, and over to the right of the memorial is the Freedom Tower," which he also designed. He gestured down Greenwich Street to the lined-up plots assigned to celebrated architects Norman Foster, Richard Rogers and Fumihiko Maki. "That's where Towers Two, Three and Four go."
    In the arc of Childs' sweeping arm, the future seems obvious and neat, but the present is messier. After the city was mangled and the rubble cleared, the task of filling in the trapezoid was fumbled again and again. Builders and politicians have treated the project like a child in an ugly custody case.

    The most recent dustup concerns the memorial, which, if built as originally imagined by the inexperienced young architect Michael Arad, would have cost a preposterous $1 billion. In an attempt to whittle the pricetag by half, authorities last week released a revised proposal that didn't exactly eviscerate Arad's concept but didn't please him, either.

    Multimedia mourning

    Where he had guided visitors down a ramp and into the substratum of memory and rock, the new plan has them entering through an Orwellian-sounding "Orientation and Education Center." The change would deprive visitors of the chance to react or make a private journey of remembrance before having their experience molded by videos, explanatory text panels, exhibits and narration. Welcome to the age of multimedia mourning.

    With his bland manner and bullet-pointed explanations, Childs has a talent for making the four-year scrimmage over the site seem vulgar and distant. His "Seven," as it is known, is an orderly, refined and undemanding building. It stands back from the edge of its lot, allowing Greenwich Street to pass unmolested. Its glass sheath twinkles in the sun, but its shape politely declines to dazzle. Its most distinctive feature, a rhomboid footprint, derives from the way two street grids overlap.

    Sure, the building's nondescript, but then it doesn't aspire to be descript. Let other, future structures (the supertall Freedom Tower, for instance) claim the skyline limelight. This one is just an introduction.

    Seven is a monument to craft, technology, good citizenship and green design but not to the imagination. It sucks up less energy and lets in more sunlight than a cheaper tower would. It is staunchly girded against a bomb blast. It will slow a fire and speed evacuation down its double-wide stairs. The building even frees office-workers from having to punch elevator buttons: Instead, they swipe ID cards at turnstiles that know which floors they belong on, and pass that message to the elevators.

    Accommodating a garden

    Above all, Childs is proud of his client for having sacrificed, as he puts it, "the goose that lays the golden egg," in the form of 300,000 square feet of rentable space that was left unbuilt to leave room for the street and a small, triangular garden. (Not that the lost square footage matters to Silverstein's bottom line so far: 45 percent of the 1.7 million available square feet still remains to be rented.)

    The original World Trade Center complex obliterated Greenwich Street. Restoring it was one of Childs' earliest priorities. "We knew that if we did that, anybody who came later would have to incorporate it into the master plan," he said. He was right: Greenwich does indeed keep running south, recalling the old, pre-landfill edge of Manhattan Island and the new bisecting axis of the World Trade Center site.

    From a distance, Seven World Trade looks big, but it is calibrated to the square inch to accommodate the 250,000- pound Con Edison transformers that sit invisibly at street level. The lobby is fronted in ultra-clear glass, while the other, windowless walls of the lower stories are clad in louvered metal plates that produce an iridescent sparkle when they move, like the scales of an enormous fish. A work of word-art by Jenny Holzer scrolls around the inside lobby, its lit text ricocheting off every surface and even radiating out to the street.

    A glistening gem

    Above the metallic base is a tour de force of glass: great, 12-foot sheets of the stuff, stretching from ceiling to floor and beyond. Below each pane, a strip of blue stainless steel, visible only from the upper floors of neighboring towers, bats the sunlight back skywards, giving the glass that diamond gleam.

    Silverstein spent $700 million on Seven. With it, he has given notice that Ground Zero does not get rebuilt on the cheap. What remains to be seen is how soon this deluxe property can start paying for itself, and whether the rest of the site's future towers will display more charisma than this proper pioneer.

  11. #1256

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    Great pictures above. One thing is undeniable, WTC 7 has a great feel in the building. Lighting is great and its hard to judge, but the air feels good. From the perspective of people inside buildings, light, air, and sound are right near the top of the priority list.

    WTC 7 will be an easy sell. It may be a bit challenged by the surrounding construction and Fitterman Hall/the pit, but it will become clear that those are temporary soon.

    After 9/11, real estate crashed downtown. It started to come back with bottom feeders (or visionaries, depending on perspective). Interest grew and people started diving at deals to get them before they were gone. The free market anticipates future conditions very rapidly. If you wait until the future unfolds, you'll be to late to be part of it. It'll only take a couple more chuncks of WTC 7 to go before it starts.

  12. #1257

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    What happen to the interactive lights on the base?

  13. #1258
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
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    Simple and inconspicuous projects like 7WT are the ones that Childs should be commissioned to do as mediocrity or conformity that is well done does not seem to be that bad. But he should have had no business doing the 1 WTC project as it seems to be beyond his capabilities. Hes a mediocre architect and he should stick to low profile projects like 7 WT. I would not be saying this had he not given us a boring/bland TWC project as well.

    This tower is definitely a success because it is alot better than its predecessor. Even though I'm not a fan of flat-top bldngs the facade is really nice and it glows pretty cool at night giving the Woolworth a great companion.
    Last edited by TREPYE; July 7th, 2006 at 04:56 AM.

  14. #1259

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    Quote Originally Posted by TREPYE
    Simple and inconspicuous projects like 7WT are the ones that Childs should be commissioned to do as mediocrity or conformity that is well done does not seem to be that bad. But he should have had no business doing the 1 WTC project as it seems to be beyond his capabilities. Hes a mediocre architect and he should stick to low profile projects like 7 WT. I would not be saying this had he not given us a boring/bland TWC project as well.

    This tower is definitely a success because it is alot better than its predecessor. Even though I'm not a fan of flat-top bldngs the facade is really nice and it glows pretty cool at night giving the Woolworth a great companion.
    i agree 100 percent they should have gone with Cesar Pelli

  15. #1260
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    From the New York Post:

    RENT HIKED AT 7 WTC

    SILVERSTEIN DEFIES BLOOMBERG


    July 11, 2006 -- TAKE that, Mike Bloomberg - Larry Silverstein just raised the rent at 7 World Trade Center.

    Sources say that in the past few weeks, Silverstein quietly upped the "ask" at 7 WTC by 10 percent over the original average $50 a square foot.

    Last year, the mayor made a stink over Silverstein's pricing, saying the developer should slice his rent to $35 a foot - then the average in first-class buildings downtown, all at least 25 years older.

    But Silverstein, who swiftly put up the gleaming tower even as the state, city and Port Authority bogged him down at Ground Zero, is calling the shots. Sources say that 1.2 million of the tower's 1.6 million feet are now leased or term-sheeted.

    Only 60,000 feet are actually leased. But in addition to recent term sheets - nonbinding agreements that spell out major terms of a prospective lease - for Moody's Financial Services and Vantone, we've learned that term sheets have also been signed for an additional 340,000 square feet.


    Three different Midtown companies account for those 340,000 feet. And one reason they're hot for 7 WTC is because of deals like the one Limited Brands, parent of Victoria's Secret, Limited Stores and Henri Bendel, just signed at Vornado's 1740 Broadway uptown. (Terms were not disclosed; various databases listed the asking rent at $60 a square foot.)

    The deal - negotiated for Limited by CB Richard Ellis' Mary Ann Tighe, Eric Deutsch, Jason Pollen and Ken Meyerson - gobbled up 320,051 square feet. The move from five smaller Limited office locations in Midtown represents a 50,000-square-foot expansion and also puts the retailer's several Victoria's Secret labels under one roof for the first time - "underwear everywhere," an insider said.

    But its larger significance is that it further reduces Midtown's dwindling supply of large-block availabilities, forcing more firms to look downtown.

    Tighe says Limited hired CBRE to propose a consolidation plan last December, a process that usually takes six to 12 months.

    "But we recommended within 60 days that they had to accelerate their plans, because the market was changing and large blocks were drying up."

    CBRE's Deutsch detailed how tight Midtown has become. He says that as of June 30, 2005, CBRE counted 5.28 million square feet of Midtown space available in blocks of 100,000 feet and up, out of a total Midtown inventory of 198 million feet.

    By the end of June this year, it plummeted to 3.5 million feet; and the Limited deal reduced it to a mere 3.16 million.

    Copyright 2006 NYP Holdings, Inc.

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