Page 10 of 55 FirstFirst ... 6789101112131420 ... LastLast
Results 136 to 150 of 816

Thread: Hearst Tower - 300 West 57th Street @ Eighth Avenue - by Norman Foster

  1. #136

    Default

    Ah, radical. you remind me of someone I used to know.

    Me.

  2. #137
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,781

    Default

    What always annoys me about all of this is the fact that people seem to think that there are only two camps when it comes to "Architectural innovation".

    there is the camp that likes the radically different architecture, then there is everyone else. Somehow the "everyone else" is lumped into a group that does not "favor anything new and innovative".

    That is a gross classification that is extremely unfair.

    there are all types, mione being the type that likes to see some sort of integration and progression with the surroundings.

    THAT shows skill to me. This looks like one of the toys I had when I was a kid. Go to any engineering class in architecture and you will see simple, but divergent geometrical designs like this one. I went through them, I saw them 20 years ago.

    The hardest part about architecture are two things. One is a knowledge of the materials you are working with. It would be nice to have a building with no walls, but you have to be realistic about what you are doing.

    Second is an integration. Using what is around you. Doing something radically divergent is relatively easy compared to trying to get something like that to appear to be the same, or coming from the existing building, while at the same time have a new and fresh feel to it.

    So whatever. You are entitled to your opinions, but I have seen so many gharish buildings go up in midtown lately, this just looks like another attempt to do something "more different".

  3. #138

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge
    What always annoys me about all of this is the fact that people seem to think that there are only two camps when it comes to "Architectural innovation".

    there is the camp that likes the radically different architecture, then there is everyone else. Somehow the "everyone else" is lumped into a group that does not "favor anything new and innovative".

    That is a gross classification that is extremely unfair.

    there are all types, mione being the type that likes to see some sort of integration and progression with the surroundings.

    THAT shows skill to me. This looks like one of the toys I had when I was a kid. Go to any engineering class in architecture and you will see simple, but divergent geometrical designs like this one. I went through them, I saw them 20 years ago.

    The hardest part about architecture are two things. One is a knowledge of the materials you are working with. It would be nice to have a building with no walls, but you have to be realistic about what you are doing.

    Second is an integration. Using what is around you. Doing something radically divergent is relatively easy compared to trying to get something like that to appear to be the same, or coming from the existing building, while at the same time have a new and fresh feel to it.

    So whatever. You are entitled to your opinions, but I have seen so many gharish buildings go up in midtown lately, this just looks like another attempt to do something "more different".
    Well the original building on which the foster tower is based could not reallly be more garish. I love art deco, but lets be honest, simple and tasteful it's not.

    I think the idea of the glass tower on top was not to integrate seamlessly into the original, but rather create a new era for the building. I wasn't a fan of it at first, but I've come around. Having walked through that building many times, I'm able to visualize the new interior spaces and I think it will be a real beauty.

  4. #139

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by emmeka
    Ah, radical. you remind me of someone I used to know.

    Me.
    Haha. Didn't we figure out that "emmeka" IS "Radical overemphasis" ?
    We still havent heard from emmeka about this, have we? Why did you make another name?

  5. #140

    Default

    Crane at the Hearst Tower site.

  6. #141

    Default

    Jewels on the horizon

    New midtown skyscrapers for Hearst and The Times aim to rise above the ordinary.

    BY JUSTIN DAVIDSON
    STAFF WRITER

    May 2, 2004

    The towers that make up the midtown Manhattan skyline are a motley bunch. In among the elegant needle of the Empire State Building, the twinkling chrome cap of the Chrysler Building and the runaway-truck ramp of Citicorp is a chorus line of undistinguished slabs. The ensemble changes constantly, yet the stars remain the same.

    Two projects that for now exist mostly on paper hold promise as high-rise heartthrobs: Renzo Piano's New York Times Tower, poised for the corner of Eighth Avenue and 42nd Street, and Norman Foster's Hearst Tower, already going up at Eighth and 56th. Both will one day reach out to passersby and demand a strong opinion rather than just a glazed nod.

    The Times Tower, a glass-skinned beauty sheathed in a see-through veil of ceramic tubes, is designed to disappear. An actual 52-story skyscraper rarely looks as gossamer as it does in models and renderings, but here, lightness is both a metaphoric and an architectural goal.

    Structural symbolism

    The Times wants a symbol of its journalistic values and the qualities of an ideal democracy: openness, integrity, transparency. Piano wants a structure that doesn't glower behind dark glass like a highway patrolman wearing shades. Instead, he has imagined a self-effacing edifice that will shimmer and dissolve as it rises to a slender needle.

    To achieve that mistiness, Piano decided to enclose each floor in untinted, ultraclear, low-iron glass, then wrap it in a coat of white rods, which will deflect heat and glare. The veil of rods continues upward well beyond the top story, making it look as though the shroud were being plucked skyward by a heavenly hand.

    Theatrical illusion

    The Hearst Tower spins another kind of theatrical illusion: the effect of one era's modern architecture giving birth to another's. Foster's crystal rocket will rise out of a squat, six-story structure built in 1928 for the corporation founded by William Randolph Hearst. The architect and set designer Joseph Urban gave the International Magazine Building, as it was grandiosely called, a wanly heroic touch with columns that reach past the roofline, topped with precarious Art Deco urns. It looked unfinished, and it was: The Depression squelched Hearst's plan to erect a high-rise on top of it.

    "I wanted something which had qualities of the theater and where sculpture was an important factor," Hearst cabled Urban in 1927. His headquarters should display "conspicuous architectural character" that would reflect "the public character of our publications." What he wanted, in other words, was a work of architectural branding - which his namesake corporation still desires.

    More than 70 years later, Foster has responded to Hearst's cravings for boldness and modernity with a crystal box supported not, as in traditional skyscrapers, by a load-bearing concrete core, but by an external honeycomb of steel, which the architect calls a "diagrid" of beams.

    The relationship between the new and the old is one of polite separation. Foster has eviscerated Urban's building, and the new 42-story palace seems to float above and behind the original shell. The setback pleased the Landmarks Preservation Commission, which amiably waved the project on when it came up for approval in 2001.

    The original has become all facade; the new one consists of naked structure. Where Urban emphasized the corners with exclamation points of fluted concrete columns, Foster marks them with geometric gaps, following a rigorous logic of triangles combining into hexagons: Look Ma, no vertical lines! Seen from the inside, these bird-beak corners will appear as breathtakingly canted glass walls. Urban's sidewalk setpiece will be relegated to a character role, while the real drama takes place above.

    The power of place

    The Hearst and Times projects will fill in a media corridor that runs from the Times Square agglomeration of Reuters, Condé Nast and MTV, among others, to the Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle. There's an irony to this concentration of communicators. Even as the industry grapples with a nebulous, digital future, it is still reckoning with its masonry-and-paper past. Hearst and The Times both emerged from the 19th century to become informational behemoths in the 20th. While the millennium was supposed to herald the dispersal of media into cyberspace and suburban office parks, these two companies (like many others) have bet not just on real estate and location but on the galvanizing power of architecture.

    Place wasn't supposed to matter, but media architecture shows that place matters more than ever," says Aurora Wallace, an architectural historian at New York University and author of the forthcoming book "The Architecture of News."

    "If you're not on the skyline, you don't exist."

    The Times and Hearst buildings do more than proclaim the supremacy of their media brands. They also represent a long tradition of magnanimous design, of private architecture as civic gesture. The 16th century palazzos of Florence provide one example, Rockefeller Center another. What makes these two new towers qualify as urban gifts is that they are better than the bottom line demands.

    Recent midtown architecture, expensive and flashy though it may be, has not risen to that standard. At Columbus Circle, the Time Warner Center throws open the doors of its luxury shopping mall to the throngs, but it has also crowned the West Side with two large, dark forms, like the shadows of a pair of gangsters in a classic film noir. This building is all business.

    A dozen blocks south, a complicated coalition of public officials and private interests has transformed Times Square into a public gathering place at the base of a klatch of busy high-rises that are more collectively hyperactive than individually exhilarating. The most recent of them, Times Square Tower, designed by Skidmore Owings and Merrill, will open soon; like its neighbors, it aspires to jazz heat mixed with corporate cool.

    Like all skyscrapers, Foster's and Piano's must make economic sense. The Hearst corporation will take over its whole new location, bringing under one roof publications currently scattered across nine midtown addresses. The Times will move from its location on West 43rd Street between Seventh and Eighth avenues to just the lower portion of its new tower; the project's developer, Forest City Ratner, is trying to rent out the rest of the building. Yet, these structures are intended not only to squeeze a dollar out of every bolt but to make strong statements of collective aspiration.

    Laboratories for design

    Both are also architectural research facilities. They have been engineered to withstand our era's new range of nightmare scenarios and allow thousands of people to flee with maximum efficiency. They aim to consume as little energy as possible and set ambitious standards for green design.

    Having dispensed with the traditional doughnut of cubicles wrapped around a central elevator core, their layouts strive to distribute soul-nourishing daylight and views to every rank of worker. The communal spaces have a magnificently unnecessary grandeur: The Times boasts a garden cloister on the ground floor; Hearst, a cafeteria in a lofty atrium.

    "The architects have made spaces for workers to relax and interact, which is a whole lot different than the American mentality of gathering around the water cooler," says architectural historian Carol Willis, who runs the Skyscraper Museum in Battery Park City. "These buildings are a test case for New York. It's more expensive to build a new paradigm. Will it be attractive enough for tenants to demand it and economical enough for developers to supply it? I don't know, but they're certainly doing a lot of research and development, which is not exactly typical for an office building in New York."

    Architectural homage

    Designed for old-fashioned companies that perform fundamentally the same tasks they did more than 100 years ago, each tower also pays its own architectural homage. Foster's Hearst dwarves and detaches itself from Urban's, proclaiming how far the art has evolved in 75 years.

    And even in all its glittering modernity, the Times Tower gestures toward the 19th century impulse to decorate the city. Its heat-deflecting ceramic tubes recall the elegant terra cotta ornamentation on such civic monuments as the Woolworth Building, says Willis. "Whether Piano was conscious of it or not, it's really part of a New York tradition."

    At the moment, that tradition is partly in the hands of an Italian and a British lord, who bring to the Manhattan skyscraper sensibilities forged in Europe and honed around the globe. For years, New York City has watched other megalopoli become skyscraper laboratories while it tolerated towers of modest distinction.

    With the planned rebirth of its downtown and this pair of midtown jewels in the offing, Manhattan is once again tending to its skyline silhouette.

    Copyright © 2004, Newsday, Inc.


    New York Times Tower

  7. #142
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Manhattan - UWS
    Posts
    4,208

    Default

    AMEN to that! :wink:

  8. #143

    Default

    A high resolution rendering:



    Here's a first look at the interior lobby:



    This space should not be closed to the public, it was afterall designed for us, however things have since changed.


  9. #144

    Default

    Part of the lobbies supercolumns have already been assembled:


  10. #145
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    The Nation's Capitol (DC)
    Posts
    61

    Default

    Wow, this looks so great. I have been to Foster's "gherkin" Swiss Re in London and was dissapointed that I wasn't allowed in any further than the lobby--so I hope we are at Least allowed in that atrium pictured above.

  11. #146

    Default

    Stern those are some killer renderings of the Hearst Magazine Building Lobby, not bad for Foster and Partners, for some reason when I look at HMB it reminds me of Foster's preliminary WTC proposal. Do you think he recycled the WTC proposal for the HMB or that’s just his style?

  12. #147
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    West Harlem
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    I thought the HMB was designed before his WTC design...

  13. #148

    Default

    Foster’s was specifically choosen for his handling of historically sensitive sites, among them The British Museum. The contrast between the old and the modern is refreshing, the approach is apparently similar on the Hearst Magazine Tower project.







    Likewise the Hearst lobby will be light and airy.

  14. #149
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Manhattan - UWS
    Posts
    4,208

    Default

    What a fantastic building...I am so happy this is getting built in NYC.

  15. #150

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gulcrapek
    I thought the HMB was designed before his WTC design...
    It was. I'm guess that's just the ideas he's playing with now.

Page 10 of 55 FirstFirst ... 6789101112131420 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 383
    Last Post: July 21st, 2012, 01:38 PM
  2. CyberCenter - Durst - West 57th
    By Edward in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: November 6th, 2010, 03:18 PM
  3. East 57th Street Tops Retail List Highest Rents In the World
    By noharmony in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: January 30th, 2008, 12:33 PM
  4. The Zebra at 420 West 42nd Street
    By Edward in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: August 30th, 2007, 01:28 PM
  5. Carnegie Mews - 211 West 56th Street
    By noharmony in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: December 19th, 2001, 10:14 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software