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Thread: Hearst Tower - 300 West 57th Street @ Eighth Avenue - by Norman Foster

  1. #121

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    Oh i hate it when people call it either of these;

    The dildo
    The erotic ghurkin
    The rocket
    The egg building

    When you see it in real life these are the last things that come into your mind, its just so amazing!

    Anyway, that hearst website is great isnt it, demolition pics, renderings, virtual tours, shedule what more do you want?

  2. #122

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    Quote Originally Posted by emmeka
    Oh i hate it when people call it either of these;

    The dildo
    The erotic ghurkin
    The rocket
    The egg building

    When you see it in real life these are the last things that come into your mind, its just so amazing!

    Anyway, that hearst website is great isnt it, demolition pics, renderings, virtual tours, shedule what more do you want?
    It is amazing to me that they have created such a comprehensive site about the projects. I guess they must have a sense they need to keep the PR spining in a positive direction?

  3. #123

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    suppose so.

  4. #124

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    My opinion of this building is that it is much better when it looks like it is slightly tapering as in this pic



    Than the square look as in this



    As far as it works with the facade of the original base, it is sooo unrelated to it that each can be taken seperately almost. I don't necessarily see that sort of total unrelation as a bad thing.

    The Foster building might work better on its own, but given that the base was there, was going to be saved, and that there would be a new tower on top then I think this is as good as could be expected. The alternative may have been to completely replicate the design for the original tower that was supposed to be built on top. That would probably be considered inadequate though by today's office standards.

  5. #125

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    Quote Originally Posted by JMGarcia
    My opinion of this building is that it is much better when it looks like it is slightly tapering as in this pic



    Than the square look as in this



    As far as it works with the facade of the original base, it is sooo unrelated to it that each can be taken seperately almost. I don't necessarily see that sort of total unrelation as a bad thing.

    The Foster building might work better on its own, but given that the base was there, was going to be saved, and that there would be a new tower on top then I think this is as good as could be expected. The alternative may have been to completely replicate the design for the original tower that was supposed to be built on top. That would probably be considered inadequate though by today's office standards.
    yes, I was justing imagining what a cool architectural statement it would have been to have either built the tower as true as possible to the original plan or made a deco tower that would have blended seemlessly, so future generations would never have been able to tell they were built almost 100 years apart. One could even have given the new stone a weathered look.

  6. #126

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    No, no, no. It would never turn out like the original. Too expensive. We would wind up with...Muschamp's description makes me laugh,

    Processed cheese. :P

  7. #127

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp
    No, no, no. It would never turn out like the original. Too expensive. We would wind up with...Muschamp's description makes me laugh,

    Processed cheese. :P
    No, but that was my point, what if it did turn out great? what if it DID look totally vintage? It would be Hearst's answer to the statement that they just don't build em llike they used to.

    Which is not to say I'm not thrilled with this project as is.

  8. #128

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    December 21, 2003

    COMMERCIAL PROPERTY | MIDTOWN

    A Tower Designed to Be Environmentally Friendly

    By JOHN HOLUSHA


    Brian Schwagerl, senior facilities manager, with a model of the Hearst Corporation headquarters building at Eighth Avenue and 56th Street.

    THE new Hearst Corporation headquarters building at Eighth Avenue and 56th Street will be an architectural standout, with a 42-story stainless steel and glass tower designed by Norman Foster rising from the interior of the six-story masonry structure the company has occupied since 1928.

    The building is also being designed and equipped to be energy efficient, to minimize waste and to provide a bright, attractive interior environment for the 1,800 employees who will work there.

    Such an approach is considered green, or environmentally friendly, because it reduces the consumption of resources while holding down pollution added to land, air and water.

    Indeed, executives of the privately held corporation, say they will be seeking the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design award from the United States Green Buildings Council, a nonprofit association of designers, builders and consultants pressing for environmentally thoughtful development.

    No building in New York City has ever won the award, although several upstate projects have been designated. Because Hearst will own and occupy the building, both the exterior and interior will be rated according to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design criteria, more commonly known as the LEED standards.

    Another new Manhattan building, 7 World Trade Center, is expected to seek the LEED award under a different set of standards, the organization's new core and shell criteria, according to Ashok Gupta, an official of the Natural Resources Defense Council, a leading environmental group. This is because developers of multitenant buildings build only the inner core and outer shell of their structures, with the tenants controlling the layout and finishing work of their own spaces.

    The new criteria could allow Silverstein Properties, which is building the replacement for one of those destroyed in the Sept. 11 attack, to seek the award for its own efforts, regardless of tenant decisions.

    The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program is an important effort in the right direction, said Mr. Gupta, who is director of the Natural Resources Defense Council's air and energy program. "LEED is a good test; it's really the only one out there," he said. "It has become a national standard."

    But because it was designed with suburban projects in mind, with points awarded for installing bicycle racks and having grass growing on the roof, it has been difficult for skyscrapers in urban locations like Manhattan to qualify. "It is harder for urban buildings to score points," Mr. Gupta said.

    The approach at the Hearst tower appears to be a combination of common sense, careful attention to how office buildings actually operate, canny shopping and some innovative design. Whether it will meet the green building criteria cannot be determined until the 850,000-square-foot, $500 million tower is completed in June 2006.

    But with officials of both the developer, Tishman Speyer Properties, and one of its consulting engineers, Flack & Kurtz, on the board of the Green Buildings Council, it will not lack for advice.

    PART of the common sense part of the approach is to ban the use of materials, coatings and adhesives that emit volatile organic compounds — known as V.O.C.'s — a family of chemicals that may include some that are health hazards. "We won't have a new building smell," said Brian Schwagerl, senior facilities manager with Hearst. "We will have zero V.O.C.'s.

    Another is recycling, which reduces the amount of waste to be disposed of and reduces the amount of virgin materials that need to be grown or mined to develop new products.

    Although the new tower was developed conceptually as an extension of the tower originally designed to eventually be built on top of the old structure, in fact the existing building has been gutted to its landmarked walls. In recent weeks, excavation machines have been pounding at the hard Manhattan bedrock to prepare a foundation for the new building.

    According to Mr. Schwagerl, about 85 percent of the demolished material has been recycled in one way or another. The steel for the new structure will be 20 percent lighter than that in a typical Manhattan office building because of the structural design and will contain at least 90 percent recycled content.

    (Since virtually all the structural steel produced in the United States comes from mills that use scrap steel as a raw material, project managers would have been hard pressed to find beams and columns made from iron ore.)

    One of the distinctive features of the building will be a grand three-story atrium, with escalators taking visitors, who will come through the existing entrance on Eighth Avenue, upward under a skylight. The escalators will be set amid a stepped wall with water flowing downward as the people rise.

    Regulating the temperature of such a large space would normally require huge volumes of chilled air and big refrigeration units to produce it.

    Engineers working on the project have devised some other solutions. For one thing, all the glass in the building will have a coating that tends to admit visible light while reflecting a large part of the invisible solar radiation that causes heat.

    The floor of the atrium will be fitted with pipes that contain chilled liquid that will absorb the heat rays that do enter, before they can be reflected back into the air.

    "The entrance opens into a 70- to 80-foot-high space with a skylight," said Asif Syed, a senior vice president of Flack & Kurtz. "That volume of space would consume a lot of energy with conventional air-conditioning." Because of the tubes, which can carry heated or chilled fluid depending on the season, the floor becomes a radiant surface either emitting heat or absorbing it, without the need for conventional air-conditioning units and ductwork. This approach has been used in Europe to cool large spaces, Mr. Syed said, but as far as he knows, it is the first time it has been used in Manhattan.

    Even the water feature surrounding the escalators is being pressed into service to help control the temperature in the entry space. "The water feature is there for architectural reasons, but we can use it by chilling the water flowing over it," Mr. Syed said. "If we want an ambient temperature of 75 degrees, we will cool the water to 65 degrees so that the water feature becomes a radiant chilling source as well."

    In the upper floors of the building, high efficiency air-conditioning equipment will be used, with sensors and variable speed blowers designed to adjust the volumes of air according to actual need, rather than at a preset level. The chilling units will use none of the chemicals that have partially depleted the earth's protective ozone layer in the atmosphere.

    "We have a system that will respond to the needs of the building," Mr. Syed said. "At lunchtime, when people leave and are not running their computers and generating heat, the sensors will detect this and adjust the system."

    LIGHT and motion sensors are to be installed as well, to turn off lights when people are absent or when there is enough natural light coming the glass outer wall that artificial lighting is not needed. "In closed offices we will use a motion sensor, and in open spaces, a light sensor," he said. "There will be a great deal of natural light, but people just do not turn off their lights, even when they do not need them."

    A grass roof may not be practical in Manhattan, but the roof on the Hearst tower will be put to use to collect rainwater. This is expected to result in a 25 percent reduction in the amount of water that will be dumped into the city's sewage system during rainfalls, compared with a similar conventional building.

    The rainwater will be stored and used to replace water lost to evaporation in the office air-conditioning system. It will also be fed into a special pumping system to irrigate interior plantings and street trees. The captured rain is expected to account for about 50 percent of the tower's irrigation needs.


    Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

  9. #129
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    I like this standard for the future.

  10. #130

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    The Swiss Re tower in London (by foster) was designed with rising atriums that spiral up the building this is so that a natural flow of air is obtained without ventilation. All of fosters buildings are equipped with such envirometally friendly and energy saving systems.

  11. #131
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    Yeah... him and Fox&Fowle are the main big-firm pioneers, I think.

  12. #132

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    steel is supposed to rise in february but the concrete is already underway;





    Unfortunatley i didnt take the pictures, they are from the hearst tower website.

    p.s. the virtual tour is great (if your computor will have the guts to run it)

  13. #133

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    I have looked at and read this forum for over two years and i will be even more exited to see this start to rise tan the freedom tower I think

  14. #134
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    I think it looks kind of like a large towel or storage rack on top of an old wooden box.

    They did not try to make it look like it was coming or integrated in any way with the original building, it looks kind of clunky.....

    Ah well, whatever.

  15. #135

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    that is your opinion and i respect that. although i strongly dissagree.

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