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Thread: Empire State Building - 350 Fifth Avenue @ 34th Street - by Shreve, Lamb and Harmon

  1. #556

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  2. #557

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    It would be a real shame if HFZ tears down the Bancroft Building. What's up with these money grubbing churches? You should e-mail them your picture: INFO@HFZCAP.COM

    Residents Seek to Save Former Camera Club Building, Stave Off Development
    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/2013...ff-development


    The building is preserved in the massing study below however...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #558
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    This Is What Could Become of 29th Street's Bancroft Building

    by Sara Polsky



    Neighbors launched a campaign to preserve the Bancroft Building, at 3-7 West 29th Street, an 1896 structure known for being the former home of Alfred Stieglitz's Camera Club. But while preservationists were making their moves, nearby Marble Collegiate Church has been making its own plans to replace the Bancroft Building with. The Madison Square North Historic District stops just short (a half a block) of the site, so although the church's need for additional air rights might be a holdup to the project, landmarking is unlikely to save the Bancroft Building.



    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...lding.php#more

  4. #559
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    That's bloody treason against the city.

  5. #560
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    Particularly unfortunate considering the massive surface parking lot across the st. There are still a few of them around, and they're just hard to figure out. There must be a story behind each one, though (assemblage, title issues, senility, etc).

  6. #561

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    Just the local NIMBYs at work. I have no problem with this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    It would be a real shame if HFZ tears down the Bancroft Building. What's up with these money grubbing churches? You should e-mail them your picture: INFO@HFZCAP.COM

    Residents Seek to Save Former Camera Club Building, Stave Off Development
    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/2013...ff-development


    The building is preserved in the massing study below however...

  7. #562
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    The Seemingly-Doomed Bancroft Bldg -- No. 7 West 29th St.

    by Tom Miller


    The pinnacles of Marble Collegiate Church (one seen at far right) were nearly
    duplicated on the roof of the Bancroft Building.

    In February 1875 the Association of the Bar purchased the substantial brick home at No. 7 West 29th Street. Midway between Fifth and Sixth Avenues, the mansion sat in a most fashionable area for the club’s proposed headquarters. The neighborhood and the exceptional size of the property—75 feet wide, or about three full building lots—were reflected in the price; $100,000 or about $2 million today.

    The Association’s minutes noted “The situation is healthy and agreeable, central, and easily accessible from every direction, and it was believed the property was not likely for a long time to come to depreciate in value.” Regarding the mansion, the notes called it “A brick building of substantial structure covered forty-five feet of the width of the lots, and was of convenient depth. By property alterations, without undue expense, it could, in the opinion of the Committee, be made adequate for the purposes of the Association for several years to come.”

    Indeed, the Association was in the mansion for several years—twenty, to be exact. Then on October 1, 1895 it sold the property as it prepared to move to its new headquarters that extended from 43rd to 44th Streets between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. The buyer, real estate developer Edward H. Van Ingen, paid $225,000 for the property, $25,000 below asking price. The New York Times surmised “The purchasers…will probably erect a business structure on the site.”

    The New York Times was right. The 29th Street neighborhood was no longer one of clubs and mansions. Business buildings and hotels were now cropping up in the area. Van Ingen commissioned esteemed architect Robert H. Robertson to design an eye-catching modern office building on the site of the venerable mansion.

    Robertson had become known for his own take on Romanesque Revival in the previous decade. But for what would become the Bancroft Building, he went in a completely different direction. Completed in 1897, six stories of red brick and white stone were sandwiched between a limestone top floor and a three-story rusticated limestone base. The stone bands and voussoirs created a vibrant contrast with the rich red brick—reminiscent of the popular Venetian Gothic and Ruskinian Gothic styles of a generation earlier. Above it all, Robertson perhaps gave a friendly nod to the Marble Collegiate Church next door, facing Fifth Avenue, by adding near-matching pinnacles on the Bancroft roof.


    Sturdy limestone piers and columns contrast with the light-hearted red and
    white treatment of the middle floors.

    With the building completed, Van Ingen was ready to cash in. On August 25, 1897 he traded the Bancroft Building for another plot ready for development. The New-York Tribune reported “The valuable plot of land at Broadway and Thirty-ninth-st., on which it was intended to build the Herald Square Hotel, was traded by Julien T. Davies to Edward H. Van Ingen for the Bancroft Building and a sum of money.” The New York Times estimated the value of the still-vacant Bancroft Building at “from $650,000 to $750,000."

    Davies was quick to fill his new building. Among the first tenants were a surprising number of architects. Two months later, in January 1898, Architecture and Building commented “The Bancroft Building, 3, 5, and 7 West Twenty-ninth Street, New York, is about to become quite an architectural centre. Mr. Henry Rutgers, Marshall Babb, Cook & Willard, Parish & Schroeder and John E. Howe occupying the entire ninth floor.”

    Full article and more pics

  8. #563

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    Such a shame. The red and white portion gives it a ton of character.

  9. #564

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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post

    Davies was quick to fill his new building. Among the first tenants were a surprising number of architects. Two months later, in January 1898, Architecture and Building commented “The Bancroft Building, 3, 5, and 7 West Twenty-ninth Street, New York, is about to become quite an architectural centre. Mr. Henry Rutgers, Marshall Babb, Cook & Willard, Parish & Schroeder and John E. Howe occupying the entire ninth floor.”
    All sounds very 'Fountainheady'.

    Though in principle I agree with saving an old building like the Bancroft the aesthetics don't do much for me. Reminds me of some lego creations I once assembled many moons ago.

  10. #565

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    Sweet candy cane effect on the mast & antenna tonight.

  11. #566
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Not sure I'm so crazy about the new psychedelic illumination up top.

  12. #567

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    The light shows are fine for special occasions. For everyday, something gentle would suffice. Like a soft-twinkle Christmas tree as opposed to a bright flashing one.




  13. #568
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    I like the light show. You can now actually stop to watch and admire it whereas before you don't even look at it much.

    Hey, we're also in the 21st century now.

  14. #569

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    This one might be better. Silent from 1930, except for old-timey film reel noise for effect. Also has captions interspersed explaining phases of construction.




  15. #570

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    Quote Originally Posted by scumonkey View Post

    It will be a huge crime if this beautiful brick building on 29th is razed, particularly since there's a huge parking lot next to it.

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