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Thread: Javits Center Expansion (& Cancelled Jets Stadium)

  1. #46
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    They should built the Hotel on top of the convention center expansion at 41st between 11th and 12th avenue. That way they could also built the residential/hotel building as well on 42nd and 11th.

    Do I have to think for them? :wink:

  2. #47

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    Jets’ Offensive Geared Toward P.R. Conversion

    by Blair Golson

    Speaking to a packed ballroom of droopy-eyed business leaders in the New York Hilton on Mar. 16, Crain’s New York Business publisher Alair Townsend issued a stern warning to potential hecklers at her magazine’s breakfast forum on the proposed West Side stadium for the New York Jets.

    "Scattered around this room are many plainclothes security personnel from the hotel, private guards and the NYPD," she said. "Should any [outburst] occur, people will be removed swiftly …. If I get annoyed enough, I’ll press charges."

    Ms. Townsend had been warned about the possibility of a disturbance by an article in that morning’s New York Post, which quoted an activist as promising some polite heckling that would fall short of "throwing a pie" in anyone’s face.

    The activist quoted was David Oats, the founder of the fledgling Queens Olympic Committee, which is advocating the construction of a new stadium for the Jets in Queens and not on the West Side.

    Perhaps cowed by Ms. Townsend’s admonition, Mr. Oats’ polite heckling amounted to nothing more than the distribution of photocopied fliers to forum attendees. In the meantime, Jets president Jay Cross and NYC and Company Chairman Jonathan Tisch calmly batted away critical questions about the stadium proposal from two journalists who rounded out the forum’s panel.

    For Mr. Cross, at least, it was a marked improvement from the defensive performance he made during a meeting called by Community Board 4 in late February. That contrast is emblematic of the Jets’ new efforts to build support for the project. Although the stadium plan still faces widespread opposition, the Jets have begun to show that they have supporters, too. In the last two weeks, a group of minority city and state legislators endorsed the stadium, as did the chairman of the City Council’s finance committee, and the team expects several key union leaders to do the same on Mar. 18.

    Proponents of a Queens-based stadium have yet to start their public-relations campaign in earnest, but Mr. Oats had plenty to say about the Jets’ recent publicity efforts. He pointed out that only three minority legislators showed up at a press conference to tout minority support for the West Side project. He also noted that the Council’s finance committee chair, David Weprin of Queens, acknowledged that he based his endorsement on a financial study that the Jets themselves had commissioned from Ernst and Young.

    "I don’t think they’re on a roll," Mr. Oats said of the Jets. "I think they’re in a free fall. What they’re doing is re-arranging the deck chairs on the Titanic."

    Mr. Oats said his presence at the Crain’s forum served notice that he and his supporters "are going to be at every single thing that the Jets do."

    That may be so, but both Mr. Oats and Manhattan-based stadium opponents have the disadvantage of facing a Mayor and a Governor who support the plan and who refuse to consider seriously the idea of building the stadium in Queens, where the Jets once played before moving to the New Jersey Meadowlands in the early 1980’s.

    At the Crain’s forum, Mr. Cross and Mr. Tisch made two announcements that further added to the sense of momentum for the stadium project. Mr. Cross said that one of the top show bookers of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center now supports the proposed stadium, which would provide additional space for the convention center when it is not being used for football.

    The show booker, Jeff Little, president of George Little Management, had been a vocal opponent of the project, and his changed position means that the Jets can claim that the city’s top three show producers are now in favor of the proposal. This would seem to weaken the argument of critics who claim that the stadium will not be attractive to show bookers, and will not provide a large economic benefit to the city—as the Jets contend.

    A spokesman for Mr. Little acknowledged that his changed position was at least in part due to political realities: The Bloomberg administration and Governor Pataki are pushing hard for the simultaneous construction of the stadium along with a northward expansion of the Javits Center. Because Mr. Little apparently feels that he cannot oppose the stadium while supporting the convention center’s expansion, he has, in effect, joined the Jets’ team.

    "There’s been an evolution in our thinking in relation to the project," said Cathy Steel, a spokeswoman for Mr. Little. "The company is supportive of an expansion of convention center facilities, but to the extent that both the Javits expansion and the stadium development are going to move forward together, in that instance we would be willing to support the stadium."

    For his part, Mr. Tisch announced that the executive committee of the city’s Hotel Association had conditionally approved—andwould recommend to its full board—a $1.50 per-key, per-night surcharge to room prices to help pay for the expansion of the Javits Center. Although that funding source won’t directly affect the stadium, the two projects are politically linked, and Mr. Tisch clearly hoped that the boost to the Javitsexpansion would convey a sense of momentum for the stadium proposal.

    The Jets and city and state officials are pushing to begin stadium construction quickly because it is a centerpiece of the city’s bid to host the 2012 Summer Olympic Games. The International Olympic Committee may begin winnowing down the finalist cities as early as May.

    The Jets would pay $800 million for construction of the stadium, which will sit on a stretch of M.T.A.-owned rail yards between 30th and 33rd streets and 11th and 12th avenues. The city and the state would each contribute $300 million for the construction of a deck over the rail yards and a retractable roof—a necessary feature in order to use the stadium as a convention hall. In addition, the M.T.A. expects to be compensated for the transfer of the air rights of its rail yards. No agreement on that issue has yet been publicly announced.

    Respected civic organizations like the Regional Plan Association and the Municipal Arts Society, which often play a significant role in influencing arguments for or against large city projects, have yet to take a public stance on the West Side stadium proposal. A spokesperson for the M.A.S. said that the group is waiting for more information before it takes a position. To date, the city and state have not announced how they will pay their $600 million share of the project—a figure that doesn’t include the potential cost of the air rights to the M.T.A. rail yards. A spokesperson for the R.P.A. said that the organization hopes to play the role of a "neutral convener" of all sides in the controversy. The R.P.A. has dedicated its Apr. 16 annual assembly to the issue.

    You may reach Blair Golson via email at: bgolson@observer.com.

    This column ran on page 1 in the 3/22/2004 edition of The New York Observer.

  3. #48

    Default some pix of said site.....

    here are some chilly pix of that site a few days ago----






    more are available at---
    http://nyc-architecture.com/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=5

    here's my site-
    http://www.nyc-architecture.com/

    (be aware-some problems with the good old unix-windows case sensitivity lack-of interface is stopping a lot of the pix from loading.will fix soon)
    cheers
    tom

  4. #49
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    WOW...They have ALOT of covering to do... :roll:

  5. #50
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    Great photos!

  6. #51

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    Wow, those are chilly photos... Hard to believe that it is past the middle of March. As usual, I blame the groundhog. :x

  7. #52

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    The New York Times
    March 24, 2004

    Plan for Jets' Manhattan Stadium Surges Ahead

    By CHARLES V. BAGLI


    This artist's rendering, released in New York Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2004, depicts an aerial view of the proposed new development on Manhattan's West Side. The site, west of Madison Square Garden, includes proposed new office towers, a vast convention center and a waterfront stadium for the New York Jets football team.

    New York City and state officials say they will unveil plans tomorrow to build the Jets a 75,000-seat stadium with a retractable roof on the far West Side of Manhattan and to nearly double the size of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center next door.

    It would be one of the city's most ambitious urban redevelopment projects, officials said yesterday, second only to the $12 billion rebuilding of Lower Manhattan.

    It would also open a new chapter for professional football in Manhattan. The last major game was on Dec. 14, 1963, when the Jets — the former New York Titans — lost, 19-10, to Buffalo before 6,526 fans at the Polo Grounds in Harlem. That stadium was torn down four months later. The Jets moved to Shea Stadium in Flushing, Queens, where they played until they left New York altogether in 1984 for the Meadowlands Sports Complex in New Jersey.

    Elements of the West Side plans have been circulating for years. But the announcement tomorrow at the Javits center will mark the first formal commitment by the city and state to move forward, with hopes of breaking ground next year. The $2.8 billion proposal is tied to plans to lure the 2012 Summer Olympics and extend subway service west.

    When Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Gov. George E. Pataki unveil the plans and a proposed financing package, the project will be called the New York Sports and Convention Center. The new stadium, to be built over rail yards, is viewed as a significant element in creating a half-mile "convention corridor" that will stretch along 11th Avenue from 30th to 40th Streets.

    Despite the push by the governor and the mayor, the projects still face a series of hurdles, including an environmental review, zoning approvals, state legislation for the Javits expansion and any legal actions.

    The project would be financed with $600 million each from the city and state, $500 million from a temporary hotel tax, $800 million from the Jets and the remainder from other private sources.

    The $1.4 billion stadium has been the project's most debated element, while the $1.4 billion Javits expansion has the support of the hotel industry, some Broadway theater owners, community groups and elected officials. They fear the stadium will displace working-class residents and increase traffic congestion and pollution. Most everyone predicts there will be lawsuits.

    To blunt criticism by economists that stadiums are poor public investments, the city has worked with the Jets to design the stadium so that it can be used for conventions, trade shows, meetings and plenary sessions, as well as concerts and other sporting events.

    The stadium would also double as the Olympic stadium if the city wins its bid for the 2012 Summer Olympics. The city is eager to move the projects forward now, in part, because it wants to show some progress before the International Olympic Committee meets in May to pare its list of candidates for the 2012 Games. The committee will make its final decision in July 2005. The Jets want to start construction next year so they can move into their new home by their current lease expires in 2008.

    Opinions vary on the city's Olympic chances, but real estate and business leaders favor the redevelopment of the far West Side. The city is in the process of rezoning the neighborhood to encourage the development of 30 million square feet of office space over the next 30 years. It also wants to extend the No. 7 subway line west from Times Square underneath 41st Street to 11th Avenue and then south to 34th Street.

    The announcement tomorrow will come a month after Deputy Mayor Daniel L. Doctoroff proposed a $3.7 billion financing plan to cover the extension of the subway line, create new parks and build a massive deck over a different section of the rail yards, where office buildings and a cultural institution could be built.

    "The business community considers the expansion of the Javits to be the most significant economic development investment that the city and the state could make," said Kathryn S. Wylde, president of the Partnership for New York City. "And the redevelopment of the far West Side is critical to the future of the city."

    Sheldon Silver, the speaker of the State Assembly, also supports the Javits expansion, but said "the jury is still out" on the stadium.

    "We have to look at it very carefully," he said.

    And Assemblyman Richard L. Brodsky, a Democrat from Westchester County, called for more public discussion about the use of scarce public resources for stadiums and the subway extension. "This has been a back-room operation so far," he said. "There's growing sentiment that it needs a public airing, pro and con."

    According to state and city officials, the governor will announce the $1.4 billion plan to expand the Javits center north from 38th to 40th Streets. With more exhibition space and meeting rooms, it will be able to attract larger conventions and present more than one trade show at a time, officials say.

    The cost of the Javits project will be covered by $300 million from the city; the $1.50-a-night hotel tax, which would expire once the $500 million goal is met; and the refinancing of the bonds on the Javits. State officials also hope to guarantee the bonds by using the state's Sonny Mae mortgage insurance.

    They are also hoping that a private company will chip in $200 million for a proposed convention hotel on 42nd Street, although in other cities the hotels have required substantial subsidies.

    The Jets have agreed to put up $800 million for the stadium over the rail yards bound by 11th and 12th Avenues, between 30th and 34th Streets.

    The $600 million from the state and city would pay for the retractable roof and the platform on which the stadium would be built.

    The Jets would also pay an undetermined rent to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which owns the rail yards, according to executives on both sides. The transit agency is also close to an agreement with the city over compensation for the use of the yards, state and city officials said.

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  8. #53

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    Jets Stadium page with renderings at Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates

  9. #54

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    March 25, 2004

    The Rush to a Stadium

    As the city prepares to announce plans to give the New York Jets a stadium on Manhattan's far West Side, it has asked New Yorkers to see the stadium as anything but just a place to watch football. The stadium has been presented as a potential venue for the 2012 Summer Olympics, as part of an expansion of the Javits Convention Center and as an anchor in redeveloping the area. Anyone against the stadium, it might seem, is automatically opposed to those other appealing projects. That is simply not true.

    The Olympics may or may not come to the city in 2012, but a project as big as the stadium has to be judged on its own merits, not simply as a potential ticket to the honor of being the host of the Games. The Javits Convention Center expansion is needed, but it does not require a stadium. And a looming football stadium may be more albatross than anchor for the Bloomberg administration's redevelopment plans for the West Side.

    In short, while there may be a compelling reason to situate a football stadium in Manhattan, officials have not offered it. Meanwhile, the potential downside is disturbing — there are concerns about how the project would be financed, what impact it would have on traffic and whether there would be better uses for that prime piece of real estate.

    By choosing a state-owned site, which is over the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's rail yards, Mayor Michael Bloomberg is freed from having to ask approval of the City Council, which vetoed Mayor Rudolph Giuliani's attempt to get a stadium in the same part of town for the Yankees. Unlike the Yankees, the Jets have offered to make a substantial financial contribution, $800 million. But the city and state would have to split the remaining $600 million cost. That number could go higher if overruns occurred.

    The plan to finance the stadium involves selling bonds against future tax revenue in the area. If the city's plans for redevelopment went well, tenants would start flocking to the far West Side, choosing that area over new Lower Manhattan office space. But if that failed to happen on the city's ambitious timetable, taxpayers would be liable for the shortfall. We'd like to see the city comptroller, William Thompson Jr., analyze the risk — preferably after holding public hearings on the whole project.

    Perhaps the most critical part of a plan for developing the far West Side is the extension of the No. 7 subway line, and much of the allure of the stadium plan was the fact that it seemed coupled to expanded subway service to the area. Now the state seems to be backing away from the No. 7 expansion. Any plans for the far West Side must include not only building the subway, but also a guarantee that the strapped Metropolitan Transportation Authority is able to pay for the service and maintenance.

    The Olympics would be a good thing for the city, but getting the Games seems a fairly long shot, and it is disturbing that the planners failed to work harder to come up with an alternate possible stadium site. New Yorkers are being pushed into a deal that could, in the end, leave the city with nothing but a football team playing on the river, more traffic congestion and a pile of new debt.

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  10. #55
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    The renderings on the KPF page make me wonder if the stadium with cast the Hudson River Park in a shadow fort he first half of the day.

  11. #56

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    New York Newsday
    March 25, 2004

    Plans for West Side stadium formally announced

    The Associated Press


    The most recent rendition of the planned west side stadium.

    City and state officials announced plans Thursday for a $1.4 billion stadium for the New York Jets that would also anchor New York's bid for the 2012 summer Olympics.

    "We will have a home to bring the Jets back from New Jersey, and pro football back to New York City," Gov. George Pataki said in making the proposal official.

    Officials also announced plans to nearly double the size of the Jacob K. Javits Center next door.

    The Javits Center and the stadium, which is to be called the New York Sports and Convention Center, would together form a "convention corridor" stretching along 11th Avenue from 30th to 40th streets.

    The Jets have agreed to spend $800 million on the stadium, but the city and state would have to kick in $600 million for a deck over the existing rail yards and a retractable roof that will allow the facility to be used for concerts and trade shows as well as Jets games.

    Despite strong support from Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Pataki, the plan faces major hurdles including an environmental review, zoning approvals and likely lawsuits by opponents.

    Officials say the Javits Center expansion, which would cost another $1.4 billion, would allow the city to attract larger conventions that now bypass New York for other cities.

    The Javits expansion will be partly financed by a $1.50-a-night hotel tax.

    The Jets currently share the Meadowlands in New Jersey with the New York Giants. Their lease expires in 2008.

    The proposed stadium is part of the city's ambitious redevelopment plan for the far West Side, which also includes extending the No. 7 subway line from Times Square to 11th Avenue and 34th Street.

    The new stadium would also be the centerpiece of New York's bid for the 2012 Olympics, serving as the Olympic Stadium for opening and closing ceremonies at the Games, Bloomberg said.

    Copyright 2004 Newsday, Inc.

  12. #57
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    Let the lawsuits begin.

  13. #58

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    (Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates)


    (Associated Press)

  14. #59

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    March 25, 2004

    West Side Stadium Plans Unveiled Amid Praise and Protest

    By KIRK SEMPLE

    City and state officials formally unveiled an ambitious $2.8 billion development proposal for the far west side of Manhattan today that would nearly double the size of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center and include a 75,000-seat stadium for the New York Jets.

    At a press conference that had the tone of a pep rally, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said the new complex would generate thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in revenue for the city, as well as revitalize a forlorn section of midtown Manhattan.

    "It's about our future," he declared. He said the project would make the neighborhood "the premiere destination of 21st century New York."

    Mayor Bloomberg, who was joined today by Gov. George E. Pataki and other officials, said the stadium would be an essential component of the city's bid to lure the 2012 Summer Olympics. Planners hope to begin construction by next spring and finish the project in 2010.

    But for all the enthusiasm of its boosters, the development project faces several high hurdles, including environmental assessments, zoning approvals and almost-certain legal challenges.

    Some neighborhood residents and local officials have criticized the plan as a waste of taxpayers' money and a recipe for traffic nightmares, and have mobilized a lobby to block the project.

    John Fisher, spokesman for a coalition of community groups opposing the plan, called today's announcement "nothing more than hype in search of substance." He said in a statement that the proposed project would have "adverse ripple impacts throughout all of Manhattan."

    Another opposition coalition that says it supports the convention center expansion but not the stadium, held a rally today at a community park within view of the convention center. They accused the city of subsidizing a sports team at the expense of schools, health care and other public needs that have suffered because of cuts in the city's budget.

    "It's not a plan for our neighborhood, it's a plan for the Jets," Councilmember Christine Quinn, who represent's the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood, said at the rally. She was among several local and state officials who attended the rally, organized by the Hell's Kitchen/Hudson Yards Alliance, a neighborhood organization.

    "The mayor and the governor are trying to package a popular Javits expansion into an unpopular football stadium," said Anna Levin, a leader of the Alliance. "We want sensible economic development in this area, but this is certainly not what we have in mind."

    Opponents also say the stadium will displace working-class residents, and most everyone from all sides of the debate predicts there will be lawsuits.

    Mr. Pataki said the expanded convention center and new stadium would help create more than 15,000 jobs for the city and provide more than 500,000 days of additional hotel bookings per year.

    "It's going to mean economic growth, exciting growth," he said.

    Calling himself "one of those long-suffering Jets fans," the governor said the stadium would finally return the football team to Manhattan; it played games at the Polo Grounds until 1963.

    "We will have a home to bring the Jets back from New Jersey, and pro football back to New York City," he declared. The Jets quarterback, Chad Pennington, also attended the ceremony today.

    As the centerpiece of the Olympic proposal, the stadium would serve as the site of the opening and closing ceremonies as well as the track and field competition, Mayor Bloomberg said.

    The city is eager to move the projects forward now, in part, because it wants to show some progress before the International Olympic Committee meets in May to pare its list of candidates for the 2012 Games. The committee will make its final decision in July 2005.

    The Jets want to start construction next year so they can move into their new home by their current lease expires in 2008.

    The new stadium, to be built over rail yards, is viewed as a significant element in creating a half-mile "convention corridor" that will stretch along 11th Avenue from 30th to 40th Streets.

    The stadium would be financed with $300 million each from the city and state, $800 million from the Jets and the remainder from other private sources. The stadium would be built over the rail yards bound by 11th and 12th Avenues, between 30th and 34th Streets.

    The $600 million from the state and city would pay for the retractable roof and the platform on which the stadium would be built.

    The Jets would also pay an undetermined rent to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which owns the rail yards, according to executives on both sides. The transit agency is also close to an agreement with the city over compensation for the use of the yards, state and city officials said.

    The Javits expansion would be financed by $300 million each from the city and the state; $500 million from a temporary $1.50-per-night hotel tax; and the refinancing of the bonds on the Javits.

    Opinions vary on the city's Olympic chances, but real estate and business leaders favor the redevelopment of the far West Side. The city is in the process of rezoning the neighborhood to encourage the development of 30 million square feet of office space over the next 30 years. It also wants to extend the No. 7 subway line west from Times Square underneath 41st Street to 11th Avenue and then south to 34th Street.

    Officials said today that the expansion of Javits center north from 38th to 40th Streets would provide more exhibition space and meeting rooms, and would therefore be able to attract larger conventions and present more than one trade show at a time.

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

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    Official press release:

    March 25, 2004

    MAYOR MICHAEL R. BLOOMBERG AND GOVERNOR GEORGE E. PATAKI ANNOUNCE HISTORIC PLAN TO CREATE CONVENTION CORRIDOR ON MANHATTAN'S WEST SIDE, INCLUDING EXPANDED JAVITS CENTER AND NEW 75,000 SEAT SPORTS AND CONVENTION CENTER

    Convention Corridor To Generate 42,000 Construction Jobs And 17,500 New Permanent Jobs

    Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Governor George E. Pataki today were joined by civic, industry and community leaders to announce New York City's Convention Corridor, a historic plan to transform and modernize New York City's convention industry. The Convention Corridor will include the expansion of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center to 42nd Street in two phases. The first phase expanding south to 33rd Street and north to 40th Street, including a 1,500-room convention hotel and the creation of the New York Sports and Convention Center, a new multi-purpose facility that will serve as both a 75,000-seat stadium and a 200,000 square foot exhibit hall - home to the New York Jets, and possibly the 2012 Olympics. The Convention Corridor will double convention center capacity, enabling New York City to vie for hundreds of events - and millions of dollars in economic activity - now lost to other cities.

    "Today, Governor Pataki and I are pleased to announce that the State and the City have taken a giant step forward in realizing our shared vision for the Hudson Yards area on Manhattan's Far West Side: the creation of the new Convention Corridor," said Mayor Bloomberg. "By building the Convention Corridor and making a targeted set of public investments including extending the 7 line, creating acres of new parkland and greater access to the waterfront, and rezoning this area to allow for exciting new housing and commercial opportunities, we are beginning a process that will create hundreds of thousands of jobs in construction, tourism and new businesses, large and small. Together, we are making an investment and a statement that will propel New York into the front ranks of the convention industry. This project will increase the square footage of New York's main convention center space from 18th in the country to 5th. We are bringing the New York Jets home where they belong, and capturing millions of dollars a year and thousands of jobs now lost across the river. The total transformation of the area will make all of New York more vibrant and economically sound for generations to come."

    Governor Pataki said, "The Convention Corridor is an historic opportunity to build a world-class sports and convention center worthy of New York City. This development project will create thousands of jobs, and bring in millions of dollars in revenue every year that New York City currently loses to other cities. The expansion will mean a doubling of Javits' current convention capacity, catapulting New York to its rightful place among the top convention destinations in the country. This is a smart City-State investment in New York's future and one that leverages private investment to grow our convention industry and help realize New York's Olympic dreams. Not only will the New York Jets finally return home to New York, but they will be creating a multi-purpose facility that will host dozens of events throughout the year and generate tens of millions of dollars in annual revenue to the City and State."

    Chairman of Empire State Development Charles Gargano said, "For years, the Javits Center has been unable to accommodate the changing needs of New York City. An expanded Javits Center will finally meet these needs and make the West Side more attractive to visiting businesses and conventions. In addition, it will bolster the state's second largest industry - tourism, and will provide economic benefits for the local community for generations to come."

    Deputy Mayor for Economic Development and Rebuilding Daniel L. Doctoroff said, "The Convention Corridor including the New York Sports and Convention Center and development of the surrounding area will solidify New York City's standing as a tourism destination. The unique array of spaces in the Convention Corridor will allow New York City to host nearly every trade show or convention of any size including the 2012 Olympic Games should we be lucky enough to be chosen. Simply put, investment in the Hudson Yards will create a more vibrant city for generations to come."

    Jacob K. Javits Convention Center Chairman Robert E. Boyle said, "Today's announcement is the beginning of the realization of a long-held dream of the entire Javits Center family. Ever since, under Governor Pataki's mandate in 1995, we began a new era of Center management, the tremendous turnaround that's been accomplished has made New York one of the most sought-after venues for trade shows, conventions and special events in the country. We are turning away almost as much business as we can book, and clearing space into the year 2025. That is why we are so thankful that our expansion is a major part, along with the NYSCC, of the redevelopment of Manhattan's West Side."

    Jets Owner Woody Johnson said, "When I became owner of the team in 2000, I pledged that my highest priority was to bring the Jets back to where they belong, right here in Manhattan. Today was a long time in the making, but well worth the wait for a home to call our own. The New York Sports and Convention Center will also be home to major events, such as the Final Four, while doubling as New York City¹s only mid-size convention center to complement the Javits Center. It will become part of the fabric of the neighborhood, housing a museum, a community theater and several signature restaurants, while reconnecting the west side to the waterfront. The Jets are proud to invest $800 million in the future of our city to create the greatest sports and convention center in the world. And we thank New York City and State for committing the resources to make that investment possible."

    NYC & Company Chairman Jonathan M. Tisch said, "The tourism industry is a vital part of our economy and critical to New York City's future. The Convention Corridor will allow New York City to win a greater share of the multi-billion dollar meetings and convention market - bringing more business, more visitor spending, and more jobs to New York City's five boroughs."

    President of the New York Hotel and Motel Trades Council and Business Manager of HERE Local 6 Peter Ward said, "The expansion of the Javits Center and the New York Sports and Convention Center will mean an end to seasonal layoffs in New York City's hotel industry forever, as well as additional jobs in many industries. We are delighted that the City, the State and the Jets have the vision to create Convention Corridor, and that they have shown confidence in the future of New York. Our 25,000 members are committed to transforming that vision into reality."

    President of the Hotel Association of New York City Joseph E. Spinnato said, "The Hotel Association of New York City has long and vigorously supported the expansion of the Javits Center. To that end, our members have decided to help support the funding of that expansion through a $1.50 fee per key per night on occupied rooms with the stipulation that the fee be allocated strictly for the expansion of the Javits Center."

    Battery Park City Authority Chairman James Gill said, "After fulfilling our commitment of providing $600 million dollars to the City of New York for low-cost housing, the Battery Park City Authority is proud to work with Governor Pataki, Mayor Bloomberg and Comptroller Thompson for the joint purpose of expanding the Javits Center and providing economic opportunity for Manhattan's West Side."

    The Javits Center Expansion

    Although nationwide, the Javits Center ranks first in attendance and second in number of shows among all convention centers, it ranks 18th in overall capacity. As a result of inadequate capacity, Javits Center has had to turn away bookings representing 800,000 room nights over the next five years.

    Ultimately, the new Convention Corridor will be expanded from 760,000 square feet to 1.1 million square feet of exhibit space, 256,000 square feet of meeting rooms, and 86,000 square feet in new ballroom space as part of the Phase 1 expansion. The Phase 1 expansion will cost $1.4 billion and funded through several sources. The City will contribute $350 million through reserve funds made available by Battery Park City Authority. The State will contribute $350 million through restructuring of existing Javits Center bonds and utilizing special federal advanced refunding legislation. The hotel industry has agreed to a dedicated $1.50 per key surcharge that will generate $500 million. And lastly, the 1,500-room headquarters hotel at 42nd Street and 11th Avenue will be constructed with a $200 million private investment. After Phase 2 expansion, total exhibit and meeting space will be 1,705,000 square feet -- this expansion will be financed separately. When complete, the expansion will have a profound impact on New York's economy, increasing the existing $97 million annual tax revenue generated by Javits by an additional $53 million and 415,000 hotel nights a year. The expansion will create 10,830 additional jobs.

    The New York Sports and Convention Center

    The New York Sports and Convention Center (NYSCC) is conceived as the most dynamic multi-purpose facility in the world. Approximately 17 days a year, the facility will function as a stadium including home to the New York Jets for 10 games and host to sporting events and concerts such as the Final Four and a Super Bowl, on the remaining days, and possibly other large scale events like the Olympics in 2012. During the rest of the year, the NYSCC will double as New York City's first mid-size convention center and offer ancillary space to the Javits Center linked via an underground concourse while also attracting new shows. It will become part of the fabric of the neighborhood, housing a museum, a community theater and several signature restaurants while providing much needed open space.

    To make the NYSCC a reality, the New York Jets will invest $800 million, the largest private investment to a comparable facility, and they will pay the MTA annual ground rent for use of the property. The City and State will each contribute $300 million to build a deck over the rail yards and for the stadium's retractable roof, which will permit the facility to be used year-round. The State's contribution will be dedicated toward the platform over the rail yards, and the City and State's contribution to the NYSCC is limited to $300 each. The Jets have pledged to absorb any excess costs, and should the project come in under budget, the City and State will share in cost savings. As with the Javits expansion, the NYSCC will also have a profound impact on New York's economy, generating 6,700 permanent jobs, and $75 million in additional revenue to the City and State.

    Convention Corridor - Investing in the Future

    The investment in the creation of the Convention Corridor is a true public-private partnership. The project will generate $128 million annually in new City and State tax revenues, in addition to the $97 million in tax revenues currently generated by Javits, for a total of $225 million in annual City and State revenues. Total annual debt service costs on the public sector's $1.3 billion contribution to the Convention Corridor are estimated to be approximately $91 million. Moreover this investment will propel New York's convention corridor into the top five convention centers in the country, supporting the vital tourism and convention industry for years to come. And the combination of added exhibition and meeting room space, the ballroom, and the flexible capacity of the NYSCC give New York a unique ability to host nearly any event, convention, or trade show held in the United States.

    Construction is expected to begin on Convention Corridor in spring 2005, following the conclusion of a comprehensive environmental review now underway.

    Mayor Bloomberg concluded, "This announcement is not only about tourism, conventions and sports. It's also about something even bigger. It's about our future, and making sure that future means jobs for New Yorkers, and opportunity for everyone up and down the economic ladder. It's about diversifying our economy, so we can better withstand recessions, like the recent one that hurt so many New Yorkers. And it's about transforming a community that has been neglected by our City for years, and withered in the shadows of the rest of Manhattan."

    www.nyc.gov

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