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Thread: The Bank of America Tower a.k.a. One Bryant Park - by Cook + Fox Architects

  1. #1291

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    Definitely -- the pizza is (was) great.

    The building, though ... zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
    The building was mediocre, but no worse than much lowrise crap that's still left in the area. The real loss was the old and slender Remington Building. The building I was the happiest to see go was McDonalds. Take that, Ronald!

  2. #1292
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    The lack of affordable places to grab lunch or breakfast will ultimately become liability. City zoning needs to address this more. Not only must buildings like this accommodate places so they can offer workers reasonably priced meals, but they also need to ensure that some retail space is broken into smaller spaces to maintain and facilitate small business. I agree with MidtownGuy. It's a problem.

  3. #1293
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    Don't forget 'wichcraft, which has a couple kiosks right in Bryant Park. I've heard they are very good.

  4. #1294
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Yes, some type of zoning laws need to be created that prevent active streetscapes from being transformed into impenetrable glass walls with nowhere for small businesses to exist.

    I would like to clarify that I am not concerned simply with eateries. The abundance of smaller sized stores of all varieties are the charm and lifeblood of the city, and part of what makes it special. They are being chipped away in every single neighborhood and replaced by storeless walls, or big spaces suitable only for corporate clone stores and banks. How much of this damage do people think New York can absorb without being fundamentally changed for the worse?

    Anyway, I live in Midtown and see it every day- people pile out of the huge new towers at lunchtime, and they head straight for some 5 story building that has the things they really need. For example, over on Third Ave., not far from me, there is a block of small old buildings among the towers, that I swear feed 80% of the officeworkers within walking range.

  5. #1295

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    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy
    ...For example, over on Third Ave., not far from me, there is a block of small old buildings among the towers, that I swear feed 80% of the officeworkers within walking range.
    Are these the utterly dilapidated buildings on the west side of 3rd in the low 40's? I can't wait for them to be demolished (and am shocked that they have not been torn done already). The same holds true for another group of run-down tenaments in the 50's on the west side of 3rd which house, among other things, a Ray Bari pizza place.

  6. #1296
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    No, they're in the low 50's.

    As for the group that houses Ray Bari Pizza, those buildings are important to us, who live in the area. There is an ice cream store, an arab tobacco store, a health food eaterie, a deli, among other things. If they are gone, what replaces them will have none of those things, I can guarantee.

    Londonlawyer, this statement is very upsetting. Does a neighborhood exist only to please you, as you drive or walk through? Or is it important for a neighborhood to actually have the things that improve quality of life for the residents that exist there every single day? Ray Bari's will deliver a great pizza late at night, when the other places are closed. I like that, and it really comes in handy. You would like to remove it from my life by tearing down the only buildings within blocks likely to house such an establishment.

    Besides, they aren't even as decrepit as you suggest. Actually, they add texture and life to an otherwise unliveable expanse.

  7. #1297
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I've noticed that Duane Reade (in their stores downtown) has moved the "edibles" to the front -- and greatly expanded the amount of merchandise. It's all crud, but there are shelves and shelves of it. Disgusting. But obviously that is something that customers are looking for (at least NYU students).

  8. #1298
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    Default Standing up for Duane Reed

    I am originally from West haven CT and grew up spending lots of time in NY. Now I get to return several times a year, both for getaway weekends and business tradeshows. When spending a week in Manhattan those Duane Reeds are indespensible for toiletries, bottled water and other little necessities. Why are the so picked on?

  9. #1299
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Why ^

    1. Horrible signage

    2. Every 6 blocks

    3. Nasty store managers

  10. #1300

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    TallGuy, I can see your point; and Lofter1, I can see yours too.

    I loathe Duane Reades because there are so many of them. Like Starbucks. Ubiquitous. They make the urban landscape uniform, dull, predictable. Makes any place in New York pretty much like every other place.

    Reason there are so many: they're ultra-successful at getting people what they want --as mom and pops never were. Whenever I visit New York I'm forced into a grudging Duane Reade visit for some necessity and sundry, and I'm always astonished at their selection and their efficiency at cramming such a variety in such a small space. In the sunbelt where I live drug/convenience stores typically have three times the square footage and half the selection.

    Duane Reade is just too good at what it does. Like Starbucks or McDonald's. Hate it, wish mom and pop could compete, but since they can't...got to get what you need someplace.

    Now if someone started up a chain to compete head on...or three or four chains to compete head on...or if the government said quantity discounts were monopolistic practices...why, we'd be back to corner stores run by...you guessed it...mom...and pop.

  11. #1301

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    Nasty store managers
    I love the manager of my local Duane Reade. He's actually a nice, helpful guy. The lazy, bitchy employees leave something desired, but their behaviour is sadly typical of most New York cashiers.

  12. #1302
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    Why ^

    1. Horrible signage

    2. Every 6 blocks

    3. Nasty store managers
    . . . And the cats. I hate cats.

  13. #1303
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    Sorry to pull us back to the building, but I walked by this evening. I am feeling kind of bad for the employees who wond have an office by a window. The floor plates are HUGE and cavernous. To be stuck in a cubicle in the middle of one of those floors (new building or not) is going to suck.

  14. #1304

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    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy
    ...Londonlawyer, this statement is very upsetting. Does a neighborhood exist only to please you, as you drive or walk through? Or is it important for a neighborhood to actually have the things that improve quality of life for the residents that exist there every single day? Ray Bari's will deliver a great pizza late at night, when the other places are closed. I like that, and it really comes in handy. You would like to remove it from my life by tearing down the only buildings within blocks likely to house such an establishment....
    Midtowndude, you really need a xanax. Trust me, the stores would relocate nearby if the buildings were razed, and you could get your Ray Bari pizza late at night.

  15. #1305
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc
    Now if someone started up a chain to compete head on...or three or four chains to compete head on....
    Watch OUt!!

    The Walgreens Cometh ...

    The old Astor Wines is becoming a HUGE Walgreens. Be assured that there are more to come.

    Maybe we'll get some price wars with D/R!!
    Walgreen Co. is the nation's largest drugstore chain with fiscal 2005 sales of $42.2 billion. The company operates 5,193 stores in 45 states and Puerto Rico.
    Walgreens in NYC as of now:


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