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Thread: Proposed - Office Tower - 1800 Park Avenue at 125th Street - by Swanke Hayden Connell

  1. #31

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    This is GREAT! Im excited to see this project rise!

  2. #32
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    :shock: WOW! I am defenetly surprice...I had my doubts at first but this is a really cool design.

  3. #33

  4. #34
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    Default I LIKE it,

    but I would LOVE it if it had bigger breasts!

  5. #35
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    Default Re: I LIKE it,

    Quote Originally Posted by TallGuy
    but I would LOVE it if it had bigger breasts!
    ... :?:

    ...Oh. :roll:

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  7. #37
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Um....

    We had a similarly proportioned structure planned as an original design in Korea.

    The main problem we had was with motion perception due to wind load. The aspect ratio (height to width) was so high that it was prone to being kind of wobbley.

    Now these guys do something similar, with a steel frame, and it was approved on all fronts?

    I would like to go to the rooftop bar one of these days in spring (gusty) and see if I feel anything.

    Unless these guys put in some special dampers or the like I have a feeling they might have some sick clients on the top floors....


    Looks nice though...

  8. #38

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    Um....

    We had a similarly proportioned structure planned as an original design in Korea.

    The main problem we had was with motion perception due to wind load. The aspect ratio (height to width) was so high that it was prone to being kind of wobbley.

    Now these guys do something similar, with a steel frame, and it was approved on all fronts?

    I would like to go to the rooftop bar one of these days in spring (gusty) and see if I feel anything.

    Unless these guys put in some special dampers or the like I have a feeling they might have some sick clients on the top floors....


    Looks nice though... Wink
    It seems as if your concers might just unfortunately be answered:

    A 220-room glass-encased Marriott Courtyard hotel opposite the Park Avenue viaduct on 125th Street. Its initial height, 42 stories, is the subject of negotiation with the city and will most likely be reduced. It will contain 57,000 square feet of retail space, 160,000 square feet of offices and 34,000 square feet of catering facilities and a residential component, most likely rentals.

  9. #39

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    Well, you just knew this was going too well...

    DAILY NEWS

    Harlem Marriott soars;
    Neighbors sore over height


    By LORE CROGHAN



    An artist's rendering of the proposed office tower.


    A mammoth skyscraper project for Marriott in Harlem may be cut down to size if an effort by a host of politicians and community groups bears fruit.

    The structure, which would dominate the historic 125th Street corridor, would dwarf the highest building currently standing - the Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building at 163 W. 125th, which is less than half the proposed Marriott's height.

    At 518 feet, the Marriott would be as tall as a 51-story apartment tower - heads above anything else on the Harlem skyline.

    "It dwarfs anything the eye can see, north, south, east or west," city Councilman Bill Perkins (D-Manhattan) told the Daily News.


    Perkins and a number of community groups have been making a last-ditch effort to get the height of the project lowered. Today, it comes before the City Council.

    They object to the height of the project, called Harlem Park - which would house the neighborhood's first full-scale tourist hotel since the 1966 closing of the Hotel Theresa, where Fidel Castro once stayed.

    The city council has veto power over celebrity architect Enrique Norten's design for the $200 million hotel, office and residential skyscraper. Developer Michael Caridi - whose investors include cowboy entertainer Gene Autry's widow, Jackie Autry - thinks the height of the tower makes it special.

    "My point of view is the building is an iconic structure," said Caridi, who renovated the Holiday Inn on W. 57th Street. "Harlem deserves something magnificent."

    Perkins also wants something special for his district - but not in a 518-foot package. He said his constituents welcome the project's 1,800 construction jobs and 986 permanent jobs, but object to such a building overshadowing their neighborhood.

    "Development is past due - but that doesn't mean anything will do," Perkins said.

    Caridi's publicists have already sent bulletins saying the ground-breaking is next month for the 222-unit Marriott. The project also includes about 100 apartments, 160,000 square feet of offices and 57,000 square feet of restaurants and shops.

    It would be built on a parking lot at Park Avenue next to the Metro North train station. The site belongs to the New York College of Podiatric Medicine.

    There's room on it for a 21-story building that would have the same floor area as the current design, and generate the same number of jobs, said architect Raymond Plumey of Civitas, a community group on the Upper East Side and East Harlem.

    Civitas sent the City Council a letter of protest after learning last week the tower would soar way past what 38 stories represents in the minds of New Yorkers. Civitas members had assumed these were 10-foot floors, like in residential buildings, which would have meant 380 feet. They were wrong.

    "We are in favor of the project," said Plumey, who works and lives in Harlem. "But we oppose the scale of the project."

  10. #40

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    DAILY NEWS

    Developer clips 65 ft. from Harlem hotel plan

    BY LORE CROGHAN



    Just one day after the Daily News reported residents' concerns about the size of the planned Harlem Marriott, the developer lowered the building to 453 feet.


    The developer of the Harlem Marriott slashed 65 feet off the height of the skyscraper at the last minute - then won crucial approval from two City Council committees yesterday.

    Developer Michael Caridi struck a deal with the land use committee's staff to lower the design of the Marriott project at 125th St. and Park Ave. to 453 feet, hours before the City Council was set to take up the matter and after the Daily News revealed the opposition that had crystalized around the project.

    Caridi had been planning a 518-foot building - an outsized design by celebrity architect Enrique Norten.

    Opponents said it would be as tall as a 51-story apartment tower and dwarf the rest of the historic neighborhood.

    Caridi's compromise moves the $200 million development project - which will be the first full-scale hotel in Harlem since 1966 - a step closer to ground-breaking.

    The changes to the project design must be okayed by the City Planning Commission, then the full City Council will vote on it.

    Caridi decided at the 11th hour to back away from his position that the building had to be very tall in order to be an "icon" for the neighborhood, and acknowledged the community's wishes for a building of a less overwhelming size.

    "The City Council recommended we do so," he told The News.

    Even at its reduced height, the Marriott will be taller than anything else on historic 125th St., including the Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building. Nevertheless, Caridi's gesture of goodwill convinced most of the members of the zoning subcommittee and the full land use committee to support his project.

    "The developer gave something back," said land use chairwoman Melinda Katz (D-Queens). This is the project's second height reduction, she added. In the summer, Caridi had proposed a 550-foot design.

    Project opponent Bill Perkins (D-Manhattan) continued to hold out against it, saying the height reduction was "a movement in the right direction - but significantly not enough."

    And he called the approximately 100 luxury apartments that will also be built in the hotel tower "a smack in the face for indigenous people in the neighborhood who are desperately looking for affordable housing."

    Other council members were more focused on the jobs the new Marriott would create.

    "This is a good project for the entire city," Katz said.

  11. #41

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    :evil: He shouldnt have lowered it, and the board shoulve approved it anyway!

  12. #42
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    The community arguments about height at times are relevant, but they are rarely considered in a context of the art that architecture can be. In this case it wasn't just a "height" being considered, but rather a "whole design". I think the community loses an opportunity to have a modern landmark tower and the architect has every right to be angry for having his art butchered..

  13. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    The community arguments about height at times are relevant, but they are rarely considered in a context of the art that architecture can be. In this case it wasn't just a "height" being considered, but rather a "whole design". I think the community loses an opportunity to have a modern landmark tower and the architect has every right to be angry for having his art butchered..
    I can understand his anger at having his vision compromised. There is one plus to the compromise, however. Even though the height of the hotel has been reduced, it still creates a new scale for the neighborhood. This building could make it easier to build more ambitious projects in the future.

  14. #44

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    DAILY NEWS

    Harlem Marriott is a go

    By FRANK LOMBARDI

    The City Council gave final approval yesterday to construction of a $200 million Marriott hotel complex in Harlem.

    The project was approved by a 39-to-7 vote despite strong opposition from Councilman Bill Perkins (D-Harlem), who represents the district in which it will be built. One Council member abstained from voting.

    Perkins maintained during the vote that the skyscraper project is too big for low-rise Harlem and represents development incompatible "with the needs of the whole community."

    "I'm voting no because there's no such thing as being bad for the community and good for the city," he said.

    Slated for a site at 125th St. and Park Ave., the Marriott project will include two retail floors at the ground level, followed by 15 floors of commercial space, 11 floors of hotel space and 12 floors of residential space. It will be the first hotel to be built in Harlem in nearly 40 years.

    Even at its reduced height, it will be the tallest building on 125th St., including the Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building.

    Approval was urged by Councilwoman Melinda Katz (D-Queens), who is chairwoman of the Land Use Committee, which reviewed and passed the project. It also was approved by the City Planning Commission, the Manhattan borough president's office and Community Board 11.

    Katz noted that the developer - Michael Caridi - originally sought to build a 550-foot-high building. That was reduced to 518 feet by the Planning Commission, and then to 453 feet during negotiations with the Council, she said.

    Katz said that in addition to creating jobs and driving economic development, the new hotel will become an icon for the Harlem community.

    But Councilman Charles Barron (D-Brooklyn) noted that the full Council normally supports the wishes of the district Council member on such issues.

    "I don't appreciate that even though the local Council member says it's not good for his district that we're going to pass it anyway," he said as he voted against the project.

  15. #45

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    Fantastic news! I still can't believe a beautiful 40 story building got approved for Harlem. Nobody could have imagined this 10 years ago. Well, it could have been 50 stories before the community intervened; so what? Its still a 40 story building, and it will set a wonderful precedent for added development in Harlem (especially on 125th street between 8th and Lex)

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