Page 17 of 77 FirstFirst ... 71314151617181920212767 ... LastLast
Results 241 to 255 of 1155

Thread: The Memorial Competition

  1. #241
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Syracuse, Ny, missing NYC
    Posts
    20

    Default September's Mission

    By the way, September's mission is raising money for the maintenance of the Memorial through an endowment fund.

    JK

  2. #242

    Default

    November 24, 2003

    METRO MATTERS

    Gentle Waters, Reflecting This City?

    By JOYCE PURNICK

    THEY have light, air, water and greenery. What the eight designs for the World Trade Center memorial do not have is a feeling of New York.

    The city's sensibility eludes easy definitions. But it is unmistakable. Times Square is New York. So are Central Park, Union Square Park, the Chrysler Building, the Brooklyn Bridge — all different from one another, but all sharing, for want of a more elegant phrase, a certain New Yorkness.

    That is part of it. New York is rarely elegant. It is dense, brash, exciting, loud, bold, irreverent.

    The eight designs remember the dead with candles, waterfalls, sanctuaries and lights. They are hushed, funereal and so generic they could be anywhere. It is difficult to imagine any of them seeming to be not just in New York but of New York.

    Most memorials do not relate to their surroundings; the Vietnam Veterans Memorial or the Holocaust Memorial Museum need not be in Washington, D.C.

    This one is different. "They attacked it because it was in New York," said Kenneth T. Jackson, president of the New-York Historical Society. "It wasn't Kokomo. It was New York, and New York represents something about power, diversity, aspirations, skyscrapers. New York is a monument to disorder, to diversity and jumbleness and a mixed-up quality of life."

    The designs — to be narrowed down soon to three finalists by a jury designated by the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation — reflect formality and restraint, not urban chaos.

    Visiting any one of them "will be like visiting the Pietà," said Bob Schneck, one of the visitors Saturday to the Winter Garden in Battery Park City, where the designs are on display. Mr. Schneck, who works for a brokerage firm nearby, recalled the trade center plaza. "I don't mean to disparage these tries. They are wonderful efforts. But I don't think any of them fit into the spirit of what was. I just remember all the stores in that spot. The Borders was there, the shoe store was there. We were able to sit around the fountain. I just cannot imagine filling all that space with trees."

    A friend of his, Barry Greenhut, predicted that New York would change the memorial. "The spirit of the city will totally inhabit it," said Mr. Greenhut, who works with computers. "People will make it whatever they want."

    But the plans are designed with such precision that although the winning design might be modified before construction, it is hard to envision even willful New Yorkers changing it afterward.

    COULD a memorial both honor the dead and reflect the city in which they lived? Yes, says Mike Wallace, a co-author of "Gotham." "Remember Union Square Park after September 11?" he asked. "People were arguing, debating, there were signs — all kinds of things. It was a civic meeting place." There might be ways to modify the winning memorial design, he suggested, to add more places for people to sit and congregate.

    Tony Hiss, who wrote "The Experience of Place," makes similar points. "You don't feel the city pressing up against these memorials," he said. "They don't relate to what is there, the underlying nature and ecosystems of the place. There's nothing that has to do with the pulling together of people, which is what New York all about."

    But to many, the trade center site is hallowed ground. Michele H. Bogart, an art historian and until recently a member of the city's Art Commission, says New Yorkers are sensitive to plans for this and other Sept. 11 memorials. "There is this pressure to create cemetery-like memorials all over city," she said. "Do the families want to have people standing around, doing whatever they do, on the plaza of the Seagram Building?"

    Probably not, but there might be more muted ways to evoke the city's character. One has to wonder if future generations visiting any of these memorials would realize that the victims of Sept. 11 died in a city that has always been a glorious idea as much as a place.

    It is its people from everywhere who get along more than they do not. It is noisy, confrontational, ever-changing and always prevailing — even over terror.

    "These designs do not evoke the sense of the staggering varieties of people who all had this horrible rendezvous together at this moment," Mr. Wallace said. People who mostly did not know one another but who worked every day together in the same place. "There is no sense of that, of daily life in this rough-hewn city."

    Votive candles, reflecting pools and beams of light can soothe and restore. But perhaps this memorial, in this city in this time, could do more.


    Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

  3. #243
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Manhattan - South Village
    Posts
    4,240

    Default

    If I had to pick one today it would be Votives in Suspension for two reasons. One, it has a tasteful and moving memorial to the victims on the footprints, and two, it leaves the rest of the site as a blank slate for a future memorial.



    The memorial is there for the victims, but not the event, which is okay since we haven't grasped the full meaning of the event yet. Gettysberg was made a National Cemetery during the war, but the memorials were built afterward. So I like the empty park, and perhaps in the future something monumental could be erected there and ceremonies can be centered around it. That, or several monuments/sculptures paying tribute to different groups. But for now at least there is a solemn place to memorialize those who were killed that day (and in '93).

    Likewise, the white stone blocks used at ground level on the footprints are two huge expanses of nothingness. Though I find them unimaginative and completely inaccessible, it's okay for now. Perhaps in the future something can be engraved on the stone, or a garden planted, or even a summertime reflecting pool - whatever.

    I'm not too keen on any of the other designs, even after going to the Wintergarden to view them.
    Lower Waters - I don't at all like how it looks from above.
    Suspending Memory - the water, the headstones, etc....
    Reflecting absence - ugly and depressing at all levels.
    Dual Memory - too gimicky and detailed.
    Passages of Light - I like that cloud, but it's hard to do anything with that site in the future, if need be.
    Garden Of Lights - I like this at the surface, but underground it's creepy.
    Inversion of Light - my number 2 pick, but what does one do in the big underground room?

  4. #244

    Default

    The Lower Manhattan Development Corp. has said that features can be mixed and matched. For instance, some of the designs include the faces of the victims while others do not. For me, at least, remembering means never forgetting the faces of Sept. 11.

    I think it's important - especially for those of us who have no remains - for the memorial to have the pictures. I want to be able to go and look at my husband, Michael, when I'm there.



    :?: How is going to bedrock being able to see your husband? Although Iken isn't erupting into a bedlam like Lynch or Ielpi, she's still on their side. Like I've said before, the memorials are too complex because the family activists have asked for too many demands. Another problem I've realized is land use. While we may consider 4.5 acres sufficient for memorial space, for NYC standards, that's a lot of space to leave vacant, and having it usable for only 9/11 anniversaries will leave a barren sunken plaza, worse than Tobin Plaza. My idea would be to raise Votives up to street level, and configure it with the site plan of Reflective Absence, only I'd move that West St. building underground. This would create a simple memorial, and provide usable space for events like concerts, and to be used to regular park space.

  5. #245
    Banned Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Park Slope, Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    8,113

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TomAuch
    ...and provide usable space for events like concerts, and to be used to regular park space.
    I agree. I think there's a real divide, perhaps understandably, between those that want to see the Memorial as solemn retreat for reflection in the midst of the urban chaos and those who want to see it as a piece of the overall return to life and activity in an area that was once a vibrant hub of humanity. I don't think there will be a reconciliation between the factions for at least a generation.

  6. #246

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    Quote Originally Posted by TomAuch
    ...and provide usable space for events like concerts, and to be used to regular park space.
    I agree. I think there's a real divide, perhaps understandably, between those that want to see the Memorial as solemn retreat for reflection in the midst of the urban chaos and those who want to see it as a piece of the overall return to life and activity in an area that was once a vibrant hub of humanity. I don't think there will be a reconciliation between the factions for at least a generation.
    While a solemn retreat area might be good for our generation, it's poor land use in the long run. Future generations won't feel the same impact of 9/11 as we have, and they'll come to regard the pit as some worthless forbidden space. If we have a street level memorial (likely by combining Votives with Reflections) then we have more usable land in the future. Think of it. The Washington Mall has plenty of land around it for non-memorial use, yet that doesn't impinge on the qualliy of the Lincoln Memorial. The best part about raising the Votives structures is that having the memorial exclusively inside already provides a buffer for the memorial.

  7. #247

    Default temporary memorial

    Having been involved in this process as a designer for over a year, I've come to the conclusion that it is too soon to be deciding on a permanent memorial. Whatever is built will need to be relevant 50, 100 years from now. While the finalists are fine work, none of them really comments on the historical context of 9/11, nor should they since so much is unknown.

    A better solution, FWIW, would be to turn the area within the slurry wall into a park, and build a temporary memorial intended to be replaced in a few years. One of the more interesting schemes being discussed, I'll post a link if I see it, is to turn it into a simple park with two pavillions. One would house display cases for each victim, and their families could display whatever the wanted there. The other would house the 5,200 design proposals.

    Not a bold architectural statement, but it would give people a lot to look at and think about. And when the right idea comes along at the right time, rip up the grass and build there. In the meantime, leaving the place open and filling it with memories like this might be the best thing to do.

    And for the "build something now" camp, this kind of thing could be done very quickly. Any of the finalist designs would take a long time to complete.

  8. #248
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    1,752

    Default Re: temporary memorial

    Quote Originally Posted by brianmsf
    A better solution, FWIW, would be to turn the area within the slurry wall into a park, and build a temporary memorial intended to be replaced in a few years. One of the more interesting schemes being discussed, I'll post a link if I see it, is to turn it into a simple park with two pavillions. One would house display cases for each victim, and their families could display whatever the wanted there. The other would house the 5,200 design proposals.
    This would be a great idea and I think that it would be wise to wait. Especially since not one of us can be objective yet.

    However, we live in a world where both the master plan and the memorial are being pushed down our collective throats. Whatever is panned in the case of the memorial will probably be what wins.

    The best that can be hoped for is that in 25 years, we will all awaken. They'll bulldoze the entire thing and put in a real park EVERYONE can enjoy.

  9. #249

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TomAuch
    While a solemn retreat area might be good for our generation, it's poor land use in the long run. Future generations won't feel the same impact of 9/11 as we have, and they'll come to regard the pit as some worthless forbidden space. If we have a street level memorial (likely by combining Votives with Reflections) then we have more usable land in the future. Think of it. The Washington Mall has plenty of land around it for non-memorial use, yet that doesn't impinge on the qualliy of the Lincoln Memorial. The best part about raising the Votives structures is that having the memorial exclusively inside already provides a buffer for the memorial.
    You have a strange infatuation with "usable space".....there were 10 million SF of office space and there will be again....your comparison of the Lincoln Memorial to the WTC Memorial is laughable

  10. #250

    Default Re: temporary memorial

    Quote Originally Posted by brianmsf
    Having been involved in this process as a designer for over a year, I've come to the conclusion that it is too soon to be deciding on a permanent memorial.
    Your right about this.....But the designs were very vague and were more concerned with the layout rather than content....they all seemed very empty and that is the right approach as its too soon to decide how we need to remember the events and their impact

  11. #251

    Default

    November 25, 2003

    Young Ideas for Solemn Sites

    By FELICIA R. LEE


    "SUSPENDING MEMORY," by Joseph Karadin and Hsin-Yi Wu, among the work by young designers that dominates the finalists for the World Trade Center memorial.

    The unveiling last week of eight competing designs for a World Trade Center memorial has provoked an inevitable debate about whether any of the projects can properly honor those who died on Sept. 11, 2001. But nearly everyone has been struck by how many of these projects, plucked as they were from a pool of more than 5,000 anonymous submissions, are the work of young artists and not the architectural elite.

    The 13-member jury for the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation has refused to comment on the finalists, who are barred from speaking to reporters. So there are only theories about why most of the teams of artists and architects who emerged are at the beginning of their careers.

    The creative team for the "Garden of Lights" design, for example, consisted of a professor, Pierre David, and two students — Sean Corriel, 22, and Jessica Kmetovic, 26 — from a Columbia University program for architects and planners. From Houston came the team of Michael Lewis and Norman Lee, who in 2000 received college degrees in theater and museum education, respectively. And the architectural partners Joseph Karadin, 33 and Hsin-Yi Wu, 29, graduated with architecture degrees from Cornell University in 1997.

    Young architects have predominated in an admittedly short tradition of competitions to design nationally significant memorials, starting in 1981 when Maya Lin, then a Yale undergraduate, was chosen to design the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington.

    In 1997 the 30-ish husband-and-wife team of Hans-Ekkehard and Torrey Butzer, with Sven Berg, was selected in an anonymous competition to create a memorial to the victims of the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. The winners of a competition to design a Sept. 11 memorial at the Pentagon, announced earlier this year, were Julie Beckman and Keith Kaseman, both in their early 30's.

    In interviews about the newcomers , artists and architects, those familiar with such competitions and scholars of American culture said more young designers than older ones probably enter these kinds of competitions. They also speculated that their presence reflected changing cultural and artistic notions of what memorials should be and even a difference in the events memorialized: the attacks in Oklahoma City and on Sept. 11 were unprecedented acts of terrorism.

    "I don't have any pat answers, but it might be that the younger folks are not wedded to certain aesthetic traditions, are willing to explore more," said Edward T. Linenthal, who has written about the creation of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington and wrote "The Unfinished Bombing: Oklahoma City in American Memory" (Oxford). "I'm thinking about the kinds of experiments in Germany, where there is a whole tradition of architects suspicious of memorial forms," said Mr. Linenthal, a professor of religion and American culture at the University of Wisconsin in Oshkosh. "They put the burden of the memorial back on the individuals themselves, so you have something like the flashing photographs of Holocaust victims," he said, an approach reflecting a different way of expressing mourning and hope.

    The Vietnam memorial in Washington is a simple black granite wall of names. The Oklahoma memorial features 168 glass and bronze chairs in a field, for 168 victims. The two-acre Pentagon memorial will have 184 benches engraved with the victims' names as a centerpiece.

    "It may be that these memorials are mostly contemporary art or that young artists relate to this time in history in a different way," said Kari Watkins, executive director of the Oklahoma City National Memorial.

    "I really think a lot of it has to do with the perception of how you capture history," she said.

    "Does it have to do with a new creative class?" she asked of the young architects and designers. "Are they more aware of everything culturally, not just art and design?"

    Mr. Linenthal said: "In New York they are protesting against the anonymity of mass death. I think there's a real suspicion now — a conviction — that the traditional pedagogical monuments will not do to memorialize these events. They are also therapeutically motivated, with the influence of survivors and family members on what designs are chosen. It both enriches and problematizes the process."

    Paul Spreirgen the Washington architect who was the professional adviser for the Vietnam memorial competition, theorized that while young people overwhelm the pool in such competitions, one also has to look at who sits on the juries. He said fresh ideas were necessarily the province of the young.

    The jury for the World Trade Center Memorial, he noted, consisted not just of people in the arts — Maya Lin among them — but politicians, community leaders, the family member of a victim. The Oklahoma City jury was similar. In contrast, the jury of the Vietnam memorial consisted of established architects, sculptors and a design journalist.

    "No one writes about the process in these competitions very much," Mr. Spreirgen said. "I don't think we'll ever do another `man on a horse' memorial. That bridge has been crossed. But I don't think the jury who chose the finalists in New York would ever have chosen the Vietnam design. It takes enormous discernment and a lifetime of training."

    So what do more diverse juries come up with? Memorials that reflect particular interests as much as design quality, he said, and a distillation of modern cultural notions of what memorials should be: inclusive of all victims and minimalist.

    One major advantage young designers have now, he said, is that drawings have more authority because of computer technology.

    Catesby Leigh, an art and architecture critic who is writing a book on memorials, sees an influence from elders. "The younger ones are working within a modernist idiom they inherited from the teachers," he said. "Water, lights, the landscape emphasis: these are conventional elements" of memorials now.

    Young designers are probably more willing than established ones to make concessions to what competition juries want, said Stanley Collyer the editor of Competitions magazine. The magazine, based in Louisville, Ky., deals mostly with architectural and planning competitions.

    The guidelines for the World Trade Center Memorial included delineation of the tower footprints, recognition of every individual killed in terrorist attacks there on Sept. 11 and on Feb. 26, 1993, and a final resting place for unidentified remains.

    Robert A. M. Stern, the dean of Yale's school of architecture, said those "emotionally charged but ill-defined" guidelines are unlikely to attract established professionals.

    "The investment is not worth the payoff," Mr. Stern said. Young designers, he said, have the energy, ambition and time to spend on a project that can instantly change the trajectory of their careers.

    But Michael Sorkin, a contributing editor at Architectural Record and director of the Urban Planning Program at the City College of New York, bet that "lots of famous architects" threw their hats into this ring. The young architects, he said, were drawn to the implicit democracy of anonymous competition in a profession that trades in brand names.

    It could well have been, however, that some of the work of the established competitors was recognizable and that the jury wanted "a fresh face," said Joan Ockman, director of the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture at Columbia University. Ms. Ockman theorized that Ms. Lin was a driving force on the jury, which led to designs that echoed her minimalist, abstract sensibilities.


    Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

  12. #252

    Default

    Downtown Express...




    World Trade Center developer Larry Silverstein looked to see how easy it would be to walk through a proposed memorial design, last week at the Winter Garden.

  13. #253
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Jackson Heights
    Posts
    285

    Default Re: temporary memorial

    Quote Originally Posted by brianmsf
    A better solution, FWIW, would be to turn the area within the slurry wall into a park, and build a temporary memorial intended to be replaced in a few years. One of the more interesting schemes being discussed, I'll post a link if I see it, is to turn it into a simple park with two pavillions. One would house display cases for each victim, and their families could display whatever the wanted there. The other would house the 5,200 design proposals.
    This is the best suggestion I've seen for the site.

    The current vogue in memorial design will become dated rather quickly. I think it's getting old already. The finalists for the WTC site, unfortunately, don't break free of the minimalist aesthetic. They won't communicate any sense of the horror, heroism, optimism, and aspirations of greatness that we all associate with the site. Brainmsf's suggestion holds great promise because it would enable the site to find ways to convey and reflect these emotions over time, while inviting the city and the world back into the site as soon as possible to mourn, remember, and create anew.

  14. #254

    Default

    November 27, 2003

    BLOCKS

    Seeking the Sublime in the Simple to Mark 9/11

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP


    At the Church of the Good Shepherd in Inwood, a steel cross from the ruins of the World Trade Center stands as a memorial.

    THE eight memorial designs being considered for the World Trade Center site seem to have done almost everything they were supposed to do. Except resonate in the public imagination.

    They may not have been greeted with the impassioned hostility from some quarters that first met Maya Lin's design for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. But neither have they been fervently embraced. And that raises some questions.

    Can a transcendent memorial actually be planned? Or are planners and the public trying to make more of a single memorial than it can possibly be?

    Conventional wisdom says that the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation followed a textbook process. Perhaps that is why it got textbook results.

    The corporation chose a conscientious and competent jury, as isolated from politics as a body can be that owes its existence to the governor and mayor. The jury perused submissions from around the world that were solicited in an open competition.

    Designers and jurors were guided by a mission statement drafted by members of the victims' families and modified through consensus and public hearings. This yielded five major program principles: that the memorial recognize each individual who was a victim of the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, and Feb. 26, 1993; that it ``make visible the footprints of the original World Trade Center towers''; and that it provide areas for the victims' families and friends, for quiet contemplation and for the interment of unidentified remains.

    By the corporation's own checklist, every finalist met the program. Though the plans ``have technical challenges that would need to be resolved during the normal design process,'' the corporation reported, none were ``fatal flaws.''

    Yet the plans seem to have left people hungering for something else.

    ``There is a remarkable sameness to these designs,'' said the New York metropolitan chapter of the American Planning Association.

    ``None provide a well-designed urban public gathering space, none make use of the artifacts from the World Trade Center buildings and none convey the urban and international texture of the place that made it a target for attack.

    ``There is nothing that evokes the experience of those further away watching the second plane hit and the towers coming down. There is nothing about those who labored in the pit or those who ministered to the rescue workers. Most glaring, the designs as they stand do little to recall the actual horror of the destruction of the towers or the void left at ground zero.''

    In general, said Michael Kuo of the Municipal Art Society, the public feels the designs ``did not communicate really what happened here, at this place'' and ``did not go beyond the victims to reflect the sense of community that held us together after our city and our lives were torn apart.'' Mr. Kuo is the planner of the Imagine New York program, which has gathered the views of more than 300 people at public meetings and more than 2,600 people through an online survey.

    Most of the missing elements cited by critics were not required by the guidelines. And it is hard to imagine that the designs would have turned out appreciably better with a 10- or 15-point program. Instead, it seems likelier that the plans would have grown even more diffuse.

    BY contrast, the 9/11 memorials that have touched the public have been unplanned, straightforward and simple. Kevin M. Rampe, the president of the development corporation, recalled them last week when he introduced the finalists. ``It began with the first flower laid gently on the steps of Trinity Church,'' he said, ``the first candle to flicker in Union Square Park, the first heartfelt message inscribed on the viewing platform overlooking ground zero.''

    It continued with the installation in Battery Park of the damaged ``Sphere for Plaza Fountain'' sculpture by Fritz Koenig, salvaged from the ruins of the trade center. And with ``Out of the Dust,'' an exhibition at St. Paul's Chapel about its ground zero ministry, which has drawn 854,000 visitors.

    It continues in the ``missing'' fliers still posted outside St. Vincent's Manhattan Hospital, at Seventh Avenue and 11th Street. It continues at Broadway and Isham Street in Inwood, where a dented steel cruciform salvaged from the trade center site stands outside the Roman Catholic Church of the Good Shepherd.

    More than anywhere, it continues at ground zero.

    The opening this week of the new PATH station has created vantages that the public has never had before, from within the foundations of the trade center. The walls of the open-air station are patterned on the viewing fence along Church Street, said Robert I. Davidson, chief architect of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. People have responded by gravitating to the edges of the station to catch a glimpse of the site.

    The extraordinary number of visitors who circulate around the site every day suggests that a memorial already exists. And while a permanent remembrance at the trade center site must be more than exposed structural ganglia in a 70-foot pit, it also suggests that the competition might have yielded a more resonant result by being simpler and more centered on the place itself.

    That would not have satisfied all the demands, unless one were to start thinking of the memorial collectively - the sphere, the pit, the chapel, the wall, the cross, each and every firehouse and all the other unplanned shrines where 9/11 has already been marked. Because in some respects, while the city has been planning a memorial, the memorial has already been built.


    Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

  15. #255

Similar Threads

  1. Memorial Sloan-Kettering - Mortimer B Zuckerman Research Building - by S.O.M.
    By Edward in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: March 7th, 2012, 11:12 PM
  2. British Memorial Garden at Hanover Square
    By NYatKNIGHT in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 60
    Last Post: May 30th, 2009, 10:36 AM
  3. Officials Plan New WTC '93 Memorial
    By amigo32 in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: February 27th, 2003, 04:51 AM
  4. Designs Leave Blanks For 9/11 Memorial
    By amigo32 in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: February 13th, 2003, 05:57 PM
  5. Memorial rises first Downtown
    By NYguy in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: January 8th, 2003, 08:24 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software