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Thread: 200 Chambers Street - Tribeca - Condo - by Costas Kondylis

  1. #76

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    The site of 200 Chambers Street in Tribeca on 1 May 2005.


  2. #77

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    NYC.gov
    PR- 205-05
    May 26, 2005

    http://nyc.gov/portal/index.jsp?epi_...&rc=1194&ndi=1

    MAYOR BLOOMBERG, ASSEMBLY SPEAKER SILVER, COUNCILMEMBER GERSON AND DEVELOPER BURTON RESNICK BREAK GROUND ON RESIDENTIAL, RETAIL DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNITY CENTER IN LOWER MANHATTAN

    Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, Councilmember Alan Gerson and developer Burton Resnick today broke ground on a residential, retail center, and community recreational facility in Lower Manhattan. The developer, West-Chambers Associates, will build an approximately 30-story tower along West Street in Manhattan's TriBeCa neighborhood with two 85-foot wings along Chambers and Warren Streets that will house residential condominiums, retail amenities, parking, and a 27,600-square-foot community facility. In addition, the Department of Education plans to lease about 10,000 square feet of space for at least 10 years as an annex to P.S. 234. The project, called 200 Chambers Street, is expected to create about 100 full-time jobs and 600 construction jobs. This project will be complimented by the Edward J. Minskoff Equities Inc. residential project across the street, which is currently going through the public approval process.

    "This is a great achievement for the residents of TriBeCa and for the entire Lower Manhattan community," said Mayor Bloomberg. "This project, which includes residential, retail, parking, and a 27,600-square-foot community facility, coupled with the second residential and retail development across the street, marks another milestone in the transformation of the downtown area into a truly round-the-clock community. I want to thank Speaker Silver, Councilman Gerson, the community representatives, the City's Economic Development Corporation and the Resnick family for working so closely with us to create an extraordinary victory for Lower Manhattan."

    "The building of this new community center facility demonstrates the amazing success of my community's ability to address a variety of cultural and recreational needs and improve the quality of life for those who live here and those who live in the surrounding neighborhoods," said Speaker Silver. "This project shows what can be accomplished when we work together."

    West-Chambers Associates, which purchased the site from the City for about $40.5 million, plans to create 258 condominium units, 14,000 square feet of retail space and about 75 below-ground parking spaces. In addition, the developer will build a 27,600 square foot community facility that is expected to be operated by Manhattan Youth, which provides a wide variety of cultural and recreational activities for downtown residents. The developer has not announced the retail tenants that will be part of the project. Chambers Street, West Street, Warren Street and the P.S. 234 playground border the site, known as Site 5C, which currently consists of about 34,000 square feet of vacant land. It is expected that the project will be completed in late 2006.

    "Our Downtown neighborhood has had a long standing need for a community center, and we are thrilled that a permanent home for a community center will be part of this project," said Assemblymember Deborah J. Glick.

    "The Resnick Development provides a model for growth and development in our city," said Councilmember Gerson. "It combines public and private investment to yield new housing, a much needed community center and space for an expanding school population. In conjunction with the development on Site 5B across the street, a portion of the $50 million set aside by the LMDC for affordable housing in Lower Manhattan will be spent on this project. I especially want to thank the developers for their awareness of and sensitivity to P.S.234 and the surrounding community by utilizing state-of-the-art noise abatement technology. This is yet another step forward in the revitalization of lower Manhattan."

    "Our ongoing commitment to downtown continues with 200 Chambers Street and we are grateful for the City's help and support in making this important project a reality," said Jack Resnick & Sons Chairman Burton P. Resnick. "The development of this magnificent property is an important building block in the resurgence and renaissance of Lower Manhattan."

    "This is a terrific example of a public, private partnership that will make an enormous contribution to the quality of life of downtown residents," said EDC President Andrew M. Alper. "Under Mayor Bloomberg's leadership, the process was moved quickly, and the City worked with a number of stakeholders to ensure we met the needs of the developer and the community. I want to thank everyone who worked tirelessly on this important project and I'm proud EDC played a key role in making this day possible."

    Edward J. Minskoff Equities Inc.'s project, which is in the public approval process, would create a 35-story tower with more than 420 residential units, about 170,000 square feet of destination and local retail space, including a Whole Foods supermarket, and two levels of below-grade public parking for up to 400 vehicles. The development, on what was formerly known as Site 5B, is located on the western side of Greenwich Street between Warren and Murray Streets. The project is expected to create about 300 permanent jobs and 1,000 construction jobs.

  3. #78

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    200 Chambers site on June,05, 2005

  4. #79
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    Here is another shot

  5. #80

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    So construction has begun? That's what it looks like to me which is just great. I was at the site in March, I had to go to Stuyvesant HS for something, and fencing was up so I figured (hopefully) a plan had been made.

    If it's one thing I hate in NYC, it's empty lots. This building doesn't look to bad, kinda fits in with BPC across the street, better than nothing!

  6. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfenn1117
    If it's one thing I hate in NYC, it's empty lots. This building doesn't look to bad, kinda fits in with BPC across the street, better than nothing!
    I like Zoe's picture in that it captures the major empty lots in the North BPC/South Tribeca area.

    * Site 5C has obviously started.
    * You have Site 5B directly across the street which will break ground later this year
    * Site 16/17 in the upper right hand corner which will also break ground later this year
    * And sites 23/24 directly behind the ballfields which proposals are going out for
    * And of course the humongous lot that is Site 26 right in the middle which hopefully will have the GS HQ there..

    You can picture these filling up over the next few years..

    btw, I wonder what's going to happen to that dog run that's right between site 5C and PS 234? Seems like it will be a bit out of place once 5b and 5c go up.

  7. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by NYCResident
    I like Zoe's picture in that it captures the major empty lots in the North BPC/South Tribeca area.

    * Site 5C has obviously started.
    * You have Site 5B directly across the street which will break ground later this year
    * Site 16/17 in the upper right hand corner which will also break ground later this year
    * And sites 23/24 directly behind the ballfields which proposals are going out for
    * And of course the humongous lot that is Site 26 right in the middle which hopefully will have the GS HQ there..

    You can picture these filling up over the next few years..

    btw, I wonder what's going to happen to that dog run that's right between site 5C and PS 234? Seems like it will be a bit out of place once 5b and 5c go up.
    Zoe's pic shows up as a red x on my computer!

    But thanks for filling me in on the area! I walked around BPC that day in March and I really like it, the buildings aren't bad, there's great views, and it's very quiet, the world financial center is also awesome! I had a good lunch inside there.

  8. #83

    Default Dog Run

    Quote Originally Posted by NYCResident
    btw, I wonder what's going to happen to that dog run that's right between site 5C and PS 234? Seems like it will be a bit out of place once 5b and 5c go up.
    From what I've read, the dog run is staying put. It will be sandwiched between the lanscaped plaza of 200 Chambers Street on the west and P.S. 234 on the east, with the new elementary school annex to the north.

  9. #84

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    From the June 2005 issue of Architectural Record:

    Big Apple residential developers embracing "signature" architects

    The New York Times real estate classifieds now feature a smiling picture of Richard Meier, FAIA, advertising his new condominium tower on Charles Street in Greenwich Village. On the same page, there is a large rendering of Gwathmey Siegel's "Sculpture for Living" high-rise condo building on Astor Place in the East Village, which features "architectural" loft residences. That these architects are at the center of such aggressive marketing campaigns hints at a trend: New York developers are embracing high-quality architecture and hiring an unprecedented number of "signature" designers to build residential projects in the city.

    The list includes not only Meier and Gwathmey, but Norman Foster, Jean Nouvel, Frank Gehry, FAIA, Herzog & de Meuron, Arquitectonica, Michael Graves, FAIA, Steven Holl, AIA, Richard Rogers, Richard Gluckman, FAIA, Christian de Portzamparc, and Robert A.M. Stern, FAIA. And that's just the beginning. Meier has four New York projects, three on the Hudson River and one in Brooklyn (no wonder he's smiling). Gwathmey Siegel has six in the works: in the East Village, the West Village, SoHo, Lower Manhattan, on Park Avenue South, and in Midtown.

    So why, outside of its world-capital status, has New York become the next stop on the architects du jour traveling parade? First, it seems that New York developers have discovered that investment in good architecture yields big returns.

    "Name-brand architecture sells better than your typical vanilla box," says Peter Stalin, editor and publisher of The Stalin Report, an online, New York-based real estate newsletter (thestalinreport.com). Buyers seem to be gravitating toward what marketers label as "distinctive" designs, which are not only attractive, but exciting - one of the chief reasons many come to the city in the first place. Hence developers, long supportive of safe, bland projects, have begun to back projects like Gluckman's One Kenmare Square on the Lower East Side, comprising a series of shifting, curved façade bands that animate the face of the building. Nouvel's 40 Mercer features glass curtain walls with alternating red and blue panes, as well as multihued flooring and loft ceilings inside. The undulating, reflective façade of Gwathmey Siegel's project on Astor Place, while attacked by some critics, has been a huge success, yielding over $2,000 per square foot, some of the most expensive real estate in the city. "As soon as this stuff translates into more money for the developer, all of a sudden design firms become relevant to them," says Gwathmey Siegel principal Robert Siegel, FAIA.

    He, along with most architects working on projects in New York, say that the success of Meier's projects (which have nonetheless experienced serious delays) have helped developers drop some of their jitters about less "safe" architecture.

    Of course, the architects would not be in New York if developers did not have the luxury of a hot market and some of the richest clients in the world. Michael Slattery, senior vice president of the Real Estate Board of New York, points out that low interest rates and a wave of popularity spurred by improvements begun in the 1990s have encouraged record numbers to gobble up real estate in the city. One indicator of demand: The median price of a condo property in Manhattan went from $455,000 in 2000 to $640,000 in 2004, according to the board.

    Spurred also by the success of designer "boutique" hotels, the trend has begun to catch on in cities like Chicago and Los Angeles, as well. But the closest comparisons are Ls Vegas, with a plethora of projects on the Strip, and Miami, where Meier and other high-profile architects are working on luxury high-rises.

    Meanwhile, as developers look for more top-rate architecture, they are also utilizing existing structures, effecting changes at some of the city's most treasured buildings. Already the Plaza Hotel's new owners, Elad Properties, are replacing the majority of the legendary building's rooms with condos. The original Metropolitan Life Insurance Building, a beautiful clockctower structure built in 1909 at One Madison Avenue, was recently sold to SL Green Realty Corporation for close to $1 billion to convert into condos.

    Richard Lang, public affairs director for the New York Landmarks Conservancy, says that many developers are considering purchasing historic buildings in the city's Flatiron district. Cass Gilbert's Austin-Nichols Warehouse on Kent Avenue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, is also being converted by condo developers.

    The Real Estate Board's Slattery argues that "it's just the nature of the evolution of the city," and a way for the city to adapt to the changing economy. Lang agrees, and notes that condominium owners often take better care of historic properties than owners who simply rent out space. But he also says he mourns the loss of public access to many great buildings, and worries about the status of many historic interiors, which can no longer be landmarked once in private hands. The Plaza's owners claim they will preserve as much as possible, as do Metropolitan Life's owners. Exteriors, too, are at risk.

    "There's not much you want to change. These are beautiful buildings," says Michelle LeRoy, vice president of investor relations at SL Green.

  10. #85

    Default Interior Renderings

    Interior renderings now on the web site at www.200chambersstreet.com.

  11. #86

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    I'm not impressed.



    What was proposed to be built before 9/11.

    Gregory Ihnatowicz

  12. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3
    What was proposed to be built before 9/11.

    Gregory Ihnatowicz
    Tragically "contextual".

  13. #88

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    It's not "contextual" in the sense that there's nothing nearby for it to be "contextual" with. It's just bland, timid, historicised crap. New York could use an architectural review commission as Boston has to banish such nonsense to Connecticut or New Jersey.

  14. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by czsz
    It's not "contextual" in the sense that there's nothing nearby for it to be "contextual" with. It's just bland, timid, historicised crap. New York could use an architectural review commission as Boston has to banish such nonsense to Connecticut or New Jersey.
    I made the comment because there's a slew of similar building just off to the left of the rendering so its contextual given a slightly wider view. You can see them on the right in the render of the tower version.

  15. #90
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    The old plan is really kitschy ...

    The new plan is just (excuse the phrase) "butt ugly".

    Aside from the community ammenities included in this project it has nothing good going for it in terms of design. A sheer wall of that height right up against West Street is just wrong.

    (I guess y'all can tell I don't like this project!!)

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