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Thread: Public Schools

  1. #1

    Default Public Schools

    I remember the former PS 168 on 104th and 1st, but there's also one just like it on 99th and 3rd, a third one over around West 108th, and a fourth over there on the West side that I found in Google maps the other night.
    They were all built around the same time 1906-1910 and basically from the same plans.
    Last edited by UrbanSculptures; February 8th, 2020 at 09:56 AM.

  2. #2

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    Nice work.

    Who buys them and for what purpose?

  3. #3
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing your lovely work with us!

  4. #4

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    I think those gargoyles are so creepy. LOL I went to Curtis HS in Staten Island and they were all over the place. You sort of felt "WATCHED" while you were sneaking out of class and smoking a cig in the alley.

  5. #5
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    What happened to the schools themselves?

  6. #6
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
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    Erasmus Hall High School


    If not the nicest one of the nicest architecturally....



    Original blueprints





    From the (1939) WPA Guide to New York City:
    Erasmus Hall High School, Flatbush and Church Avenues, often called the "mother of high schools," began as a small private academy in 1787 with an enrollment of twenty-six boys. It was the first secondary school to be chartered by the Regents of the University of the State of New York and hence is the nucleus out of which grew the vast system of secondary school education in New York. The original academy building, a fine example of Colonial architecture with its hand-carved beams and clapboards, stands in the center of an ivy-towered quadrangle. It was built in 1787 with funds contributed by Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, John Jay, and others. Around it are three-story stone and brisk buildings, Collegiate Gothic in design, completed in 1905 1925. In front of the old academy is a large bronze statue of Desiderius Erasmus copied from an original (1622) Rotterdam by Hendrick de Keiser. The entrance fee to the old Erasmus Hall Academy was one guinea and tuition was six pounds sterling, a sizable sum in those days. Students came not only from the surrounding countryside, but also from such far-off places as France, Portugal, the West Indies, Brazil, Spain, and Sweden. Discipline was severe and refractory students were punished by solitary confinement in the "brig," an attic above the classrooms, and sometimes even whipped. If the quaint wording of Rule 9 is to be taken literally, however, students who stood in the good graces of teachers were allowed a license undreamed of in modern private schools. This rule states: "No student shall be permitted to practise any species of gaming nor to drink any spirituous liquors nor to go into any tavern in Flat Bush without obtaining the consent of a teacher."

    Erasmus became a part of the public-school system in 1896, and today has an enrollment exceeding seven thousand. Its alumni include many stage and screen celebrities and athletes: among them are Barbara Stanwyck, Constance and Norma Talmadge, Jane Cowl, Aline McMahon, Eleanor Holm, Sidney Luckman, and Waite Hoyt. Other graduates are Elmer Sperry, inventor of the Sperry gyroscope; Tessa Kelly, "good angel" of the London slums; and William Duer, an early president of Columbia University.




    NameOccupationBirthDeath</B>Known forJoseph BarberaCartoonist24-Mar-191118-Dec-2006Half of the Hanna-Barbera cartoon sweatshopCarol BruceSinger15-Nov-19199-Oct-2007Singer with seven decade careerJeff ChandlerActor15-Dec-191817-Jun-1961Broken ArrowBilly CunninghamBasketball3-Jun-1943 The Kangaroo KidAl DavisFootball4-Jul-1929 Owner of the Oakland RaidersBobby FischerChess Player9-Mar-194318-Jan-2008Loony chess grandmasterMoe HowardActor19-Jun-18974-May-1975Boss StoogeEric R. KandelScientist7-Nov-1929 Signal transduction in the nervous systemLainie KazanActor15-May-1940 My Favorite YearBernie KopellActor21-Jun-1933 Doc on The Love BoatArthur LaurentsPlaywright14-Jul-1918 West Side StorySid LuckmanFootball21-Nov-19165-Jul-1998Chicago Bears QB, Hall of FamerAline MacMahonActor3-May-189912-Oct-1991Dragon SeedBarbara McClintockScientist16-Jun-19022-Sep-1992Discovered telomeresStephanie MillsSinger22-Mar-1957 The WizDonny MostActor8-Aug-1953 Ralph Malph on Happy DaysHy PeskinPhotographer5-Nov-19152-Jun-2005Sports photojournalistBeverly SillsSinger25-May-19292-Jul-2007Soprano at the New York City OperaRobert SilverbergNovelist15-Jan-1935 NightwingsMickey SpillaneAuthor9-Mar-191817-Jul-2006Mike Hammer novelsBarbra StreisandSinger24-Apr-1942 You Don't Bring Me FlowersNorma TalmadgeActor26-May-189324-Dec-1957Du Barry, Woman of PassionBob TischBusiness29-Apr-192615-Nov-2005CEO of Loews, Owner NY GiantsEli WallachActor7-Dec-1915 The Magnificent Seven


  7. #7
    Kings County Loyal BrooklynLove's Avatar
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    i wish that i had taken pictures but i actually was able to fully explore all of ps1 in LIC back in the early 90s during the months leading up to the first ever art installation there - so this was before any work had been done on the building. the boiler rooms in the basement were way creepy - think nightmare on elm street.

    this reminds me of an anecdote re the first art show at ps1. the building was still a total wreck and there was art up randomly throught the building in various rooms. anyway, i'm checking out an installation in one room from the doorway before walking in and sitting in the folding chair placed in the middle of the room for viewing. before i make my move toward the chair this massive chunk of the ceiling falls down right onto the chair, basically dessimating it. if i had been sitting in the chair when that happened i probably would've been killed.

  8. #8

    Wink Performance Art at PSI

    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynLove View Post
    ....... if i had been sitting in the chair when that happened i probably would've been killed.
    Intriguing story. And to add insult to irony, it may have been hours before you were recovered: because YOU and that pile of debris lying in the in the middle of the gallery would likely have been mistaken as being a performance art piece.

  9. #9
    Kings County Loyal BrooklynLove's Avatar
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    ^ hmm ... quite possible

  10. #10
    Kings County Loyal BrooklynLove's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lostnyc View Post
    Ive seen some pics taken inside PS 1 on flickr.com, one was of the stairwell, kind of eerie lighting in it but pretty cool.
    i'll never forget checking out the boiler room back in the day - it was ultra spooky. and the smell was sooooo musty and dank.

  11. #11
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Default Erasmus Hall High School

    Erasmus Hall and Its Offspring

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/28/re...28streets.html
    Last edited by Edward; February 15th, 2012 at 05:10 PM. Reason: Full text by Christopher Gray deleted

  12. #12
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Default Former Brooklyn Printing Plant, now public schools

    59 Third Avenue, Boerum Hill

    Former Brooklyn Printing Plant, New York Times. 3rd Ave, Pacific and Dean St. Boerum Hill.
    Albert Kahn, architect. 1929.







    Address: 59 Third Avenue, from Pacific to Dean Streets
    Name: Former Brooklyn Printing Plant, New York Times
    Neighborhood: Boerum Hill/Times Plaza
    Year Built: 1929
    Architectural Style: Neo-Classical, with Art Deco ornament
    Architect: Albert Kahn
    Landmarked: No

    Why chosen: Built as the printing plant for the NY Times, this building has been re-purposed as school space, and is part of a complex housing the Math and Science Exploratory School, Brooklyn High School of the Arts and the Kahlil Gilbran School.

    The Arts HS is the only NYC public school to offer a program in historic preservation. The NY Times signage is still on the fašade of this Classical temple.

    The large windows at street level along Third Ave allowed the public to watch the printing, collating and folding of the paper as it passed across the floor of the building. This area is now a gymnasium, a sensible reuse of open space. Kahn’s use of Art Deco motifs and styling takes the building to another level, making it one of the most interesting buildings in the Times Plaza area. The Times Plant, the Williamsburgh Savings Bank, and Hanson Place Methodist Church, along with the main school building alongside, on Dean St, form a wonderful pocket of Art Deco architecture in a mainly late 19th century streetscape.

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston..._of_the_25.php

  13. #13

    Default

    PS/IS 276 at Battery Pl



    The Board of Ed must have a stockpile of orange bricks. Matches the Visionaire terra-cotta.

    Turned out OK. Orange, white and gray brick. Limestone trim. Granite base. The roof structures will be glass.

    First Green NYC public school. Photo-voltaic cells on roof.

  14. #14

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    The brick looks really flat.




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