Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 46

Thread: Columbus Circle (Historical)

  1. #31

    Default Columbus Circle (historical)

    Thanks Stern.
    I will do so.

  2. #32

    Default Columbus Circle (historical)

    Hey Chris.

    Im hoping you've had a chance to do so, wondering what your thoughts on the entire process were?

    I find it interesing that Childs actually puched the envelope here, 750 feet being the maximum height allowed by the city zoning.

  3. #33

    Default Columbus Circle (historical)

    They need to leave Stone's curved facade alone. Do what they want with the inside and the other three sides, but leave that curved marble facade as an icon. He knew there was a circle there, and he respected it when no one else did. It is still a startling white apparition that gives me a jolt every time I catch a glimpse of it from the north. Columbus Circle will never be the same without it.

    It is New York's Taj Mahal.

  4. #34

    Default Columbus Circle (historical)

    They need to leave Stone's curved facade alone... Columbus Circle will never be the same without it.
    Don't expect anyone to agree with you until the building is gone, or worse:

    http://www.acmedigital.com/columbuscircle.html

    one of the 'concepts' the city sought for re-using the building. *This is an old rendering, but every few years I come back to Columbus Circle for some reason--meaning renderings. *When I was in Jr. HS I went to school near CS, so I was part of the rif-raf that used to hang out around there. *Its a lot different now.

  5. #35

    Default Columbus Circle (historical)

    Thanks again Stern.

    I just picked up that issue yesterday. I've not had a chance to read it yet, but it looks to be a good read.

  6. #36
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Some old shots of Columbus Circle area, from the Coliseum Park Apartments website ...

    The Majestic Theater, on the west side of Eighth Avenue between 58th and the SW arc of the Circle, circa 1905:



    Reisenweber's Circle Hotel and Cafe (where jazz was king and Sophie Tucker headlined), on the SW corner of 58th and Eighth, just south of Columbus Circle, circa 1910:



    Central Park South / West 59th Street looking west to Columbus Circle, circa 1915 (with the Majestic Theater just to the left of the Columbus Monument) ...



    Ad for the Coliseum Park Apartments (the red brick complex on Ninth Avenue just west of the Time Warner Center) showing the complex and the Coliseum (bottom), circa 1956:


  7. #37
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Interesting stuff on Durland's Riding Academy, which used to sit on the north side of Columbus Circle where the Trump International now stands, at this POST.

  8. #38
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    More on Durland's Riding Academy, and the building they built and moved to after they vacated the Columbus Circle site (back in the day I worked on this block and watched as this one came down) ...

    7 West 66th Street; From a Ring for Horses to a Studio for Anchors

    NY TIMES
    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY
    Sunday, March 28, 1999

    Streetscapes
    Last edited by Edward; February 15th, 2012 at 04:55 PM. Reason: Full text by Christopher Gray deleted

  9. #39
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    In 1905, across town at 7 East 58th Street, the New York Riding Club built a new club house -- with a huge 18,000 sf riding ring, 406 horse stalls, sumptuous interiors by Louis Tiffany, plus ...

    ... lounging rooms, dining rooms, a commodious billiards room, dressing rooms, a palm court and, in fact, aside from the riding ring and the stalls and the hospital, every luxury for the convenience for members that a wealthy and popular club suggests.
    New York Riding Club Will Have Ideal Home; When the Improvements Begun Have Been Completed It Will Have No Equal in the World -- Ring Will Be Largest in America -- Problems the Architect Has Successfully Met.

    NY TIMES
    May 7, 1905, Sunday

    EARLY one morning last week a group of gentlemen stood in a corner of the tan-bark ring at the Riding Club at 7 East Fifty-eighth Street and watched James T. Woodward, the President, break ground for the extensive alterations and additions to the club building. [ END OF FIRST PARAGRAPH ]
    Full Article [pdf] HERE with drawings of the new club building (Architect: Bradford L. Gilbert)

    ***

    Gilbert was also the architect for, among many other NYC buildings, the Dakota Stables which used to stand on Amsterdam / West 77th (now The Harrison, from the Related Companies / Robert AM Stern).

    The Architect Who Turned a Railroad Bridge on Its Head

    NY TIMES
    July 1, 2007

    HIS name is hardly known today, but Bradford Lee Gilbert designed scores of railroad buildings — among them an earlier iteration of Grand Central Terminal — as well as New York’s first skyscraper. His practice was national, but he lived and worked in New York, and the handful of buildings he left here have gradually succumbed — including, earlier this year, the poetic Dakota Stables at 77th Street and Amsterdam Avenue.

    ... The Dakota Stables, too, disappeared — but only a few months ago. In the spring of 2006, preservation groups began lobbying the Landmarks Preservation Commission to begin the process of designating the building a landmark. But by the time the commission got around to holding a hearing last October, the stables’ owner, the Related Companies, had stripped the building of its ornamentation.

    The owner plans to build a 16-story, 160-unit condominium, designed by Robert A. M. Stern, on the site of the stables, a younger sibling of the Tower Building, Mr. Gilbert’s landmark in architectural history.

  10. #40

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post

    Ad for the Coliseum Park Apartments (the red brick complex on Ninth Avenue just west of the Time Warner Center) showing the complex and the Coliseum (bottom), circa 1956:

    I've always wished they'd redevelop this site.

  11. #41
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    The Circle Building was stunning (although not Art Deco as the slideshow states) and a sad loss.



    The Castles and Clashes of Columbus Circle

    By Matt Chaban






    Circle Building
    http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showth...ll=1#post59561

    The battle between Steve Ross and Joe Moinian over the fate of 3 Columbus Circle is only the latest in a long line of controversial developments to consume the century-old redoubt. From Robert Moses to Jackie O., from Art Deco to High Modern, Columbus Circle has been one of the great stages for New York City's building history. See how it all played out since Columbus first arrived in on the corner in 1892.

    SLIDESHOW: The Castles of Columbus Circle

    http://www.observer.com/2010/real-estate/kingdoms-and-clashes-columbus-circle

  12. #42

  13. #43
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Although a magnificent job has been done restoring Columbus Circle, it's always been an amazing space.


    Vintage Photos: Columbus Circle in NYC Over the Years Since the 1900s

    by Nancy Li


    Columbus Circle, 1901 (notice the canopy of trees going up both sides of Broadway)

    Ever since Columbus Circle was redesigned in conjunction with the Time Warner Center, the area around the traffic island has transformed into a commercial destination. But like much of the city, the area had humble origins: it was once farmland owned by John Somerindyck, which only became accessible to the general public after the 9th Avenue train was built. Even then, though, the virgin lands weren’t ideal for a residential neighborhood. Instead of housing, rows upon rows of warehouses were erected around the 59th Street area.

    Things took a turn when, in the 19th century, William Eno designed Columbus Circle as part of Frederick Olmstead’s plans for Central Park with the monument at the center completed separately, in 1842–400 years after Columbus’ first landing in the Americas. The monument, a 13-feet tall statue of of the Italian explorer created by sculptor Gaetano Russo, was featured in Tatzu Nishi’s Discovering Columbus last year, an art installation turned the statue into the centerpiece of an intimate living room.

    Though the circle was completed in 1905, it’s been redesigned numerous times since its completion. While we’ve all seen modern-day Columbus Circle, we thought we’d share some photos that document the area’s evolution since its completion in the early 1900s.


    View of the Pabst Grand Circle Hotel and the Majestic Theatre at Columbus Circle in 1903.

    The sign above advertises Majestic Theatre’s production of “Babes in Toyland.” Image via Museum of the City of NY blog.



    Columbus Circle, 1905. Image via fineprintnyc.



    Panorama of Columbus Circle, 1907.



    Columbus Circle, 1912. Trolleys used to run on tracks that were built during the late 1800s.



    Columbus Circle, 1910s-1920s. Notice the increase of billboard ads and buildings.



    Columbus Circle, 1921. At this point, cars became a bigger presence around the traffic island. The Art Deco Circle Building, featured in the center of the photo, was later demolished to make way for the New York Coliseum.



    Roof signs like “Manufacturer’s Trust” were blocked from installation in the 1960s except in Times Square. Image via nyneon.



    Aerial view of Columbus Circle, 1933.



    Italian-Americans showing their support for the Allies on Columbus Day at Columbus Circle, 1943. Note the Hotel Empire neon sign which still exists today.



    Columbus Circle during a heat wave in 1944. The famous Coca Cola sign forecasted the next day’s weather, but it was changed to a reading of the current temperature during WWII, when any kind of prediction could have benefited the enemy. The sign was removed in 1965. Image via wirednewyork.com.



    Aerial view of Columbus Circle, 1952. The trolleys no longer served Columbus Circle and cars have completely replaced their presence.



    Movie still of Judy Holliday’s 1954 film, “It Should Happen to You!



    A view of Robert Moses’ New York Coliseum in 1956. It was demolished in 2000 to make way for the Time Warner Center. Image via wirednewyork.com. The area become graffiti-ridden and extremely run down by the 1990s, some which can be seen in this photograph.



    Columbus Circle, 1990s. For a time, Columbus Circle’s traffic pattern was non-circular, but it was later returned to a circular flow after the city commissioned a redesign of the traffic island.


    Tatzu Nishi’s Discovering Columbus exhibit in 2012




    View of Columbus Circle today from the Robert restaurant at the MAD Museum, with an aerial view of the redesigned public plaza




    The Charles Fazzino The Ride
    goes past Columbus Circle, featuring ballet dancers amidst residents and visitors taking time in Columbus Circle

    http://untappedcities.com/2013/11/07...s-since-1900s/

  14. #44

    Default



    This does not look lie Columbus Circle. Is this even in NYC?

  15. #45
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    ^ Oh, yeah. I've let untappedcities and http://www.vintag.es/2013/06/photogr...rom-above.html know.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Time Warner Center @ Columbus Circle - by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
    By NYguy in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 541
    Last Post: May 7th, 2016, 12:38 AM
  2. New Columbus Circle - by The Olin Partnership
    By NoyokA in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 281
    Last Post: February 13th, 2014, 03:45 AM
  3. Circle Line Cruises
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: September 16th, 2012, 09:14 AM
  4. 2 Columbus Circle Redesign - Orginal: Edward Durell Stone - Redesign: Brad Cloepfil
    By Kris in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 840
    Last Post: March 19th, 2012, 12:28 PM
  5. Time Warner Center and the Columbus Statue
    By Edward in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: May 27th, 2004, 01:57 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software