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Thread: A Tide Turns At the Seaport

  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by krulltime
    Fish Market move...The long-awaited move of New York City’s historic fish market to the Bronx from Lower Manhattan...
    I'll miss its raffish urban charm: the essence of what a great city is all about.

  2. #17

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    The "new" Manhattan and it´s new inhabitants have no use for "raffish urban charm"... they want the city to be a mirror of the suburbia they left behind.
    Last edited by Fabrizio; September 6th, 2005 at 09:04 AM.

  3. #18

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    I lived on Water Street for a few months (in the gigantic NYU dorm) and I will never understand why people are willing to shell out the big bucks to live down there. It is the ONLY neighborhood I've found in Manhattan where literally everything shuts down after 5 o'clock. My boyfriend and I were wandering around the area on a Saturday night shortly after we moved in and we were just astounded at the lack of open stores. We were like "Is there ANYWHERE we can go to get some food??" It was utterly creepy. (A girl passed us by as we walked down Wall Street and remarked "Didn't you know? They eat each other down here." Ha!)

    At the same time I will be really sad to see the fish market go...despite my reservations about the neighborhood it really is so rich in historical character, and it just seems like developers are hellbent on basically sanitizing it to death.

  4. #19
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    Sad to see the fish market go but my understanding of what I read about it last year was that the fishmarket itself decided it needed a better location and facilities, as opposed to being squeezed out by developers or the like.

  5. #20

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    Does anyone know what's going on with Milstein's parking lot on Water Street?

  6. #21
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    Like his lot on 42nd and his lot near Ground Zero, nothing. This guy has not built in almost 20 years in Manhattan

  7. #22
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    There is somtheing fishy about this development!

  8. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by kliq6
    Like his lot on 42nd and his lot near Ground Zero, nothing. This guy has not built in almost 20 years in Manhattan
    It's odd....

  9. #24
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    its odd but true, he missed out on the late 90's boom in TS casue he sat on that site on 42nd, not they will fill BOA and NYT before a tenant looks that lots way

  10. #25
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    Fish market move delayed again by lawsuit


    by Catherine Tymkiw
    September 21, 2005

    The Fulton Fish Market’s move to the Bronx has been delayed for the fifth time this year, after a company that unloads fish at the current location filed a lawsuit against the city and the market’s management.

    About 50 wholesalers created a cooperative structure and were scheduled to move to the new 450,000-square-foot Hunts Point Food Distribution Center from Manhattan’s South Street by the end of this month. But the plan hit a snag after Bay Shore, L.I.-based Laro Service Systems, which has been the sole fish unloader for the past 10 years, filed a suit to stop the market from using other people for the work at the new location.

    Laro got the business a decade ago when the city tried to clean up organized crime at the market by requiring a special license and background check in order to unload fish.

    In the lawsuit, which was filed late Friday, Laro claims that some of the people chosen for the work at the new market may have “iffy” backgrounds. A spokeswoman for the city’s Law Department disputes that, saying everyone has cleared thorough checks.

    “In a desperate 11th hour attempt to preserve its exclusive monopoly in unloading fish at the Fish Market, Laro has unjustifiably sought to disparage the fitness of the wholesale fish dealers who make up the co-op, with whom Laro has been perfectly comfortable dealing with in the past,” said Michael Cardozo, corporation counsel for the Law Department, in a statement. A hearing on the matter will be held this Friday.

    Today, Laro Chief Executive Robert Bertuglia said it doesn’t make economic sense to have two companies unloading. "The law was designed so no one group could have control over the market," he said.

    The market's move from Lower Manhattan to the new facility, dubbed the New Fulton Fish Market, has been pushed back four times, most recently from July to September. “We hope to move the fish market soon after [the hearing],” said Janel Patterson, a spokeswoman for the Economic Development Corp. She declined to provide further details.


    ©2005 Crain Communications Inc.

  11. #26
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    Court indefinitely stalls fish market's move


    by Catherine Tymkiw
    October 05, 2005

    A court ruling today indefinitely stalled the long-delayed move of the Fulton Fish Market to the Bronx.

    Judge Carol Edmead of New York County Supreme Court barred the market’s wholesalers from unloading fish at the new location. The decision was in response to a lawsuit by Bay Shore, L.I.-based Laro Service Systems, which has had the business to itself for the past 10 years.

    The city and the wholesalers plan to appeal the ruling, a process which will take at least several weeks.

    Today’s decision marks the seventh delay this year in the market’s move from Lower Manhattan to the new 450,000-square-foot Hunts Point Distribution Center. The move was most recently slated for late September.

    “It is unfortunate that last month’s anticipated move of the fish market to the new state-of-the-art facility in Hunts Point continues to be delayed by this lawsuit,” said the City’s Corporation Counsel Michael Cardozo in a statement.

    Laro got the business a decade ago when the city tried to clean up organized crime at the market by requiring a special license and background check. The company has claimed that organized crime could resurface if the wholesalers are allowed to unload fish at the new locale. The city has called those claims baseless.

    “We firmly believe that the wholesalers have the right to do what they’ve done,” said William Kuntz, an attorney with Baker & Hostetler who represents the wholesalers. “This is Laro saying we have a nice monopoly and we want to keep it.”

    Laro Chief Executive Robert Bertuglia was pleased with the ruling but remained guarded. “I’m cautiously optimistic and await the outcome of their appeal,” he said.


    ©2005 Crain Communications Inc.

  12. #27

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    Why would organized crime resurface in the new location?

    Not that I mind the court ruling; I like the market where it is.

  13. #28
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    Water and Land, Past and Present

    By SARAH HARRISON SMITH


    Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
    The East River, from the third level of the Pier 17 Pavilion


    Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
    The Lightship Ambrose served as a beacon marking the main shipping channel


    Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
    Whimsical starfish tie-rod washers at 142 Beekman Street


    Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
    Schermerhorn Row’s buildings, built starting in 1811, served as warehouses, counting houses, hotels and saloons


    Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
    A display of old wooden hotel rooms at the South Street Seaport Museum


    Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
    A display of old tools at the museum


    Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
    Many businesses are still closed after Hurricane Sandy, but the seaport’s museum is open


    Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
    The Titanic Lighthouse Memorial at the corner of Pearl and Fulton Streets


    Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
    The view from Pearl Street looking toward the East River


    Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
    Old painted signs advertise smoked, salted and fresh fish and oysters at 146 Beekman Place


    Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times
    Fresh Salt, on the ground floor of 146 Beekman Place, was flooded with eight feet of water. It reopened on Dec. 19

    The South Street Seaport was once the bustling, raucous, polyglot center for maritime trade in the Port of New York. During its peak years, in the half century after the War of 1812, ships from all over the world docked here, with their bowsprits pointing west over South Street. But the area’s proximity to the East River led to terrible flooding during Hurricane Sandy, and the historic neighborhood, much of it built on 19th-century landfill, is only beginning to recover.



    TITANIC LIGHTHOUSE MEMORIAL, a 60-foot monument to the doomed ship, marks the intersection of Fulton and Pearl Streets. From 1915 until 1968, its green light shone from the top of the Seamen’s Church Institute, a haven, hostel and advocacy organization for sailors coming through the port. The institute’s Floating Church of Our Savior for Seamen, a Gothic-style chapel built on the hull of a ferryboat, was moored off nearby Pike Street until 1910, when it was moved to Staten Island. When the institute left South Street for Battery Park in 1968, the memorial went to the newly created South Street Seaport Museum. Sadly, its time ball no longer drops at noon each day.

    ALONG THE SOUTH SIDE of Fulton Street, Schermerhorn Row’s federal-style brick buildings, built starting in 1811, served the seaport as warehouses, counting houses, hotels and saloons. At the eastern end of the street was the Fulton Ferry Hotel, whose decrepit interior Joseph Mitchell explored in “Up in the Old Hotel.” Midblock, the South Street Seaport Museum’s galleries include wooden bed chambers from another hotel on the row. Without external windows, they were more like horse stalls but might have been acceptable to a sailor used to sleeping in a narrow bunk. A graffiti inscription found on a lower floor, “Irin Mavourneen” (Ireland My Love), suggests that at least one newcomer longed for home.

    SOME SEAPORT BUILDINGS display icons of their former trades. A tobacco warehouse at 84-85 South Street, designed in 1902, sprouts stylized terra-cotta tobacco leaves. References to the old Fulton Fish Market (moved to the Bronx in 2005) and the fishing fleet that once docked here appear at 142 Beekman Street, where whimsical starfish tie-rod washers punctuate the facade of an 1885 building by George B. Post, who later designed the New York Stock Exchange, and where terra-cotta fish swim at the top of the arched windows. Next door, old painted signs advertise smoked, salted and fresh fish and oysters. But the sea giveth and the sea taketh away, and Hurricane Sandy flooded Fresh Salt, the restaurant and bar below, with eight feet of water. It reopened on Dec. 19, and seafood is back on the menu, though it comes from a lot farther away than it would have in the 1880s.

    THE CHAIN SHOPS and food courts of the vast Pier 17 Pavilion escaped much damage from the storm and are open for business. The pavilion, built in 1985, is to be redeveloped, but even in its current state, the third-floor balconies are worth venturing onto. Though not as high as the masts of the windjammer Peking, which carried wheat around Cape Horn, they offer a seagull’s view of the seaport museum’s five historic ships, and the tankers, planes, bridges and highways that made them obsolete.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/13/n...&emc=rss&_r=1&

  14. #29
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    Chronicling The South Street Seaport's Post-Sandy Decline


    The Pier 17 shopping mall in the South Street Seaport, which has not yet recovered
    from Hurricane Sandy, will be permanently closed on September 9 before being demolished.

    The shopping mall on Pier 17 has been one of Manhattan's quintessential tourist traps for over 25 years. On a hot summer day, the tourists are like bugs circling flypaper, swarming around establishments that include Shoelaces You Never Tie, The Wonders Of Rice, and Christmas In New York. Inside this massive shed, souvenir license plates and steaming trays of cheap food are served up alongside stunning views of the lower Manhattan waterfront. When this troubled old mall is closed down at the end of this week, to be replaced with a shiny new mall designed by SHoP Architects, few New Yorkers will miss it.

    But hidden on the second floor of this building is one of the neighborhood's last living connections to the South Street Seaport's past. Her name is Naima Rauam, and she has been documenting the history of the Seaport for over 45 years through her paintings and drawings. "I came here in 1966 as an arts student," said Rauam, who has maintained a studio in the mall since 2005. With a panoramic view of the Brooklyn Bridge, she is able to paint while looking out over a neighborhood that is currently stuck in a post-Sandy limbo. A neighborhood that has changed irrevocably in the past decade, and that will soon change again thanks to her landlord, The Howard Hughes Corporation.

    Rauam and all of the tenants of Pier 17 have until September 9 to close down their businesses. Then the building will be shuttered in preparation for its demolition. "I am on the verge of leaving the neighborhood and am kind of in shock," said Rauam. "Unfortunately, because of all the storm damaged buildings, I can't find a space."



    Many of the neighborhood businesses near Pier 17 were severely damaged by Hurricane Sandy and have not yet reopened. On the side streets of the Seaport, restaurants, theaters, and the Seaport Museum galleries have all been boarded up, abandoned, or vacated, while the Fulton Market Building, another mall owned by the Howard Hughes Corporation, has remained closed since the storm.

    Given all that, some business owners in the area will be sad to see the Pier 17 mall closing. "They are shutting down the only traffic we have right now," said Amanda Zink, the owner of The Salty Paw, a dog grooming business which was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. After the storm, Zink managed to secure a pop-up space inside an old bar at the Pier 17 mall, and has been working there since April. "It was a way to get up and running and to try to save my business."

    After many months of hard work, Zink and her fellow small business owners near historic Front Street are planning to reopen with a block party celebration on October 19. "We are rebirthing the old Seaport," said Zink. "I'm thrilled to say everybody is coming back." For Naima Rauam, though, the future is less certain. "I have a storage space in Staten Island," she said. "I'll have to reinvent myself." The destruction of the mall, a building she witnessed being built, is yet another loss in a neighborhood that is increasingly unfamiliar. "To watch something I have been so intimately connected with come down... perhaps I'll have to sit shiva."



    The Pier 17 mall was opened in 1985, and has had a difficult history. "For all of the high hopes attachedto Pier 17 in 1985, it has always had a hard time generating a profit," according to the Times.



    "Pier 17 has been a troubled complex for many years and has failed to live up to its potential," according to Crain's. Many of the current shops in the mall are aimed towards tourists.



    After Hurricane Sandy, a number of businesses in the mall closed down, including restaurants like Harbour Lights and Finn's Fish Market Pub.



    The entire mall will be closed on September 9th and emptied for a "complete renovation," according to the Howard Hughes Corporation. Their new mall is scheduled to open in 2015.



    On the second floor of the mall, Naima Rauam exhibits her paintings and drawings, which document the recent history of the neighborhood.



    Rauam's first studio in the neighborhood was located inside a smoked fish shop in the 1980's. For her last few days in her current space, she has a panoramic view of the East River waterfront.



    The subject of many of Rauam's paintings is the Fulton Fish Market, which was closed down in 2005. "The city wanted to get rid of it for 90 years," Rauam said. "They didn't realize what an international attraction it was."



    The fish market was relocated to the Bronx, leaving behind its old buildings. This newer section of the market was built in 1939 and is located next to the Pier 17 mall.



    The building was denied Landmark status in August, according to the Epoch Times, leaving preservationists concerned that its owner, The Howard Hughes Corporation, "will tear the building down and replace it with a high-rise structure."



    Across the street from the old fish market, the Fulton Market Building (right) remains empty, after being severely damaged by Hurricane Sandy. Its owner, The Howard Hughes Corporation, has has several lawsuits filed against it by tenants who "feel that the developer is manipulating the situation to get longtime businesses out and effectively charge higher rent to more premium tenants," according to Racked.



    Around the corner, many of the businesses that are part of historic Front Street have remained closed since Hurricane Sandy. "Here we are almost a year later, and we just got our keys back," said Amanda Zink. "All of us got our keys on July 1."



    Zink's business, The Salty Paw, is one of several empty storefronts on Peck Slip. "Before Sandy hit, we were the most bustling, up-and-coming neighborhood."



    "In the end, I have to say some positive things came from this. We created a merchants association," said Zink. "We want to be different from the new Seaport. What Howard Hughes is doing is not us."



    Zink's neighbor, The Paris Cafe, has also been closed since Sandy. "We've done a major restoration," said owner Peter O'Connell, standing in front of his newly restored 1873 wooden bar. "We've had to do the basement, the electric. We've redone everything here."



    Though renovations continue on the historic older structures of the neighborhood, the future of the Seaport is far from certain. "The key thing that I hope will happen is that we will find a viable way forward," said Captain Jonathan Boulware, the Interim President of the South Street Seaport Museum. "For the museum and, in the bigger sense, for the neighborhood."

    —Nathan Kensinger

    Nathan Kensinger [official]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...dy_decline.php

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