View Poll Results: Construction is underway, how do you feel about the final design for the WTC site?

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  • I am more than satisfied; I believe that the final design surpasses that of the original World Trade Center. 10/10

    50 26.04%
  • While nothing may ever live up to the Twin Towers, I am wholly satisfied with the new World Trade Center; it is a new symbol for a new era. 7/10

    55 28.65%
  • I have come to terms with the new World Trade Center; although it has a number of flaws, I find the design to be acceptable. 5/10

    48 25.00%
  • I am wholly disappointed with the New World Trade Center; we will live to regret the final design. 0/10

    22 11.46%
  • I am biased, but honest, and hate anything that is not a reincarnation of the original Twin Towers.

    17 8.85%
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Thread: World Trade Center Developments

  1. #2251
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    She ought to feel like an idiot for citing this thing as the "battle" the department is in the middle of right now. Seems there are more pressing issues in the city that whether a street that does not exist and which hasn't existed for decades should be open or not. I think it is a big question for the WTC planners - but we have enough people downthee working on it. She must be towing the administration's line about WTC being a priority by mentioning this.

    Was this interview only two questions or was it snipped for posting?

  2. #2252
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    Mayor calls for new plans in Lower Manhattan
    by Catherine Tymkiw

    Mayor Michael Bloomberg blasted existing plans to redevelop Lower Manhattan and outlined his own ideas in his State of the City address Thursday.

    The mayor said redevelopment was in danger of stalling unless the timeline for rebuilding is sped up. Current plans call for four office towers to be built in phases alongside the 1,776-foot Freedom Tower.

    Mr. Bloomberg called on World Trade Center developer Larry Silverstein to give up control over two key towers at Ground Zero in exchange for rent reduction. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey should commit itself to occupying a third tower, he said.

    “We need this now, to advance our economy and pay tribute to those who died there -- not a decade and a half in the future, when it fits a developer's financial plan,” he said, according to the Associated Press.

    “We share the mayor's goal of rebuilding the World Trade Center site as swiftly as possible and welcome his involvement,” said Janno Lieber, director of World Trade Center development for the Silverstein organization, in a statement. “As we have pledged many times, we will build towers 2, 3 and 4 just as soon as the government delivers the physical sites.

    Mr. Bloomberg contends that the city should be allowed to set the pace so all the projects can move forward simultaneously.

    “As City Hall is well aware, the Port Authority has not yet begun this key preparation work, including excavating the sites and building a protective slurry wall, and will therefore not be able to deliver the sites to Silverstein -- or anyone else -- for some time,” said Mr. Lieber.

    The mayor gave his fifth-annual State of the City address in Staten Island, completing a five-borough tour. He has delivered the speech in a different borough each year.

    ©2006 Crain Communications Inc.

  3. #2253

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    Mayor calls for new plans in Lower Manhattan
    by Catherine Tymkiw

    ...

    Mr. Bloomberg contends that the city should be allowed to set the pace so all the projects can move forward simultaneously.

    “As City Hall is well aware, the Port Authority has not yet begun this key preparation work, including excavating the sites and building a protective slurry wall, and will therefore not be able to deliver the sites to Silverstein -- or anyone else -- for some time,” said Mr. Lieber.
    The only rational explanation for the Mayor's position is that he wants to throw the business to some developer pal of his or Deputy Dan's. What else would cause him to try to deceive the public so blatantly?

  4. #2254
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    the Mayor should shut up, he got his wish, Lower Manhattan has gained enough residents, none of that should be used for anything but commercial

  5. #2255
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    If anyone, the Mayor should be blasting the Port Authority for taking FOREVER to get the tower sites ready instead of Silverstein who can't physically do anything until the plots of land are ready to be built on.

    It's truly bizarre how out of touch Bloomy seems to be with what is going on at the World Trade Center site.

  6. #2256

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake
    See OK, I understand the need for stuff to look nice and be pleasant and all that. I can never understand why people think that "seeing trees from Broadway" is more important than the millions of dollars in money that this will bring to the city.
    It's not one or the other - 'seeing trees from B'way' or 'millions in revenue'. With the street open or closed it will most-likely be very successful and generate lots of revenue. Like BPC said, "reasonable minds can disagree." Some want it open; others prefer it enclosed. I say open.

  7. #2257

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    "It's not one or the other - 'seeing trees from B'way' or 'millions in revenue'. With the street open or closed it will most-likely be very successful and generate lots of revenue. Like BPC said, "reasonable minds can disagree." Some want it open; others prefer it enclosed. I say open."

    I agree with this statement. Bucks will be generated even Cortlandt becomes a normal street. If projects were initiated only on the side of revenue over competing issues that don't have compelling economics, then we would have some really horrible stuff in this town. 'Sides, I always say, if you want a frigging mall, head for suburbia. Malls, to me anyway, are the antithesis of what makes NYC special.

  8. #2258

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    No Power but Persuasion for the Rebuilding of Ground Zero

    By CHARLES V. BAGLI
    Published: January 27, 2006
    NY Times

    By making the World Trade Center redevelopment a central focus of his State of the City speech yesterday, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg was promoting a plan that has been the subject of intense but secret negotiations between the developer Larry A. Silverstein and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey over the future of the site.

    Mr. Bloomberg, who has little actual power over decisions at ground zero, is using his bully pulpit to pressure Mr. Silverstein to accede to the authority's demands that he relinquish control of a major part of the 16-acre parcel in return for a reduction in rent, so that the rebuilding effort can proceed more swiftly.

    Under that proposal, Mr. Silverstein would still proceed with building the huge and symbolic Freedom Tower, while the Port Authority, which owns the land and leased it to Mr. Silverstein in July 2001, would construct a second tower on Church Street and occupy part of it. The authority would also build a multistory shopping mall and sell a third site to a developer for a hotel, office space, and, in the mayor's vision, apartments.

    The Bloomberg administration and the Port Authority contend that the new arrangement would enable all the projects, in the mayor's words yesterday, "to proceed simultaneously at the same, quick pace." Under the current schedule, the site would not be finished until 2015.

    Mr. Bloomberg has been critical of Mr. Silverstein, but in his most barbed comments to date, he called on the developer to "do the right thing" and "push aside individual financial interests and focus on what's best for the city."

    The developer disagrees, blaming government for any delays. Janno Lieber, director of the development for the Silverstein Properties, said yesterday that the company would build all the towers "just as soon as the government delivers the physical sites."

    Even if Mr. Silverstein's role were diminished, all that construction work could not begin tomorrow. A slurry wall and foundation must be built at the eastern end of the property, which could take a year or more. And it may be impossible to do all the work at once because of environmental restrictions. But the Port Authority proposal would resolve a number of issues that have been roiling beneath the surface for years.

    At one time or another, the city, the state, the authority and Mr. Silverstein have been at odds over retail space on the site, the developer's share of infrastructure costs, insurance money, and the pace of construction. In November, the developer disregarded a proposal from Anthony R. Coscia, the chairman of the Port Authority, that he give back a major portion of the site in return for a reduction in rent, which is now more than $120 million a year.

    The authority and the city contend that Mr. Silverstein does not have enough money to build all the towers. They say that the Freedom Tower alone will cost more than $2 billion and take five years to build, but that Mr. Silverstein has only $2.85 billion of the insurance proceeds left. About $200 million a year has been spent on rent, architects, lawyers and Mr. Silverstein's development fee.

    In December, Gov. George E. Pataki provided the developer with $1.76 billion in tax-free bonds to build the Freedom Tower, and gave him 90 days to work out his differences with the authority.

    All parties are prevented from talking publicly about the negotiations. But state officials cheerily say that talks are proceeding apace, while the Silverstein camp says the bargaining has yet to begin in earnest. A senior official at the Port Authority contends that Mr. Silverstein has not only refused to relinquish his hold on the property, but has also offered a counterproposal that is even more onerous than the current arrangement.

    Yesterday, Mr. Bloomberg added his explicit support for what is essentially the Port Authority's position, and a note of urgency. "Renegotiations between the Port Authority and Silverstein Properties must not wait," he said.

    That does not mean that the city, the state and the Port Authority are in lock step. For one thing, state officials and Mr. Silverstein oppose the mayor's push to build housing on the trade center site. The authority is willing to consider that, but for only a small section of one tower. For another, the governor may be reluctant to alienate Mr. Silverstein and delay the April groundbreaking for the Freedom Tower, which is expected to draw national attention, helping his presidential aspirations.

    "We have always been looking for ways to expedite the rebuilding of the remainder of the site," said Joanna Rose, a spokeswoman for the governor, "while simultaneously protecting the business and residential community in Lower Manhattan and ensuring that it remains the financial capital of the world."
    ------------------
    1. Who cares if the PA or Silverstein develops one of the office towers? I can't imagine anyone but the PA and Silverstein.

    2. One building might have a hotel and apartments in it as well as office. I actually think that is a good idea.

    3. It'll get done quicker by all accounts and there won't be any issues over whether Silverstein has the money to complete the project.

  9. #2259

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    Quote Originally Posted by STREETLOVER
    'Sides, I always say, if you want a frigging mall, head for suburbia. Malls, to me anyway, are the antithesis of what makes NYC special.
    So should we bulldoze Grand Central Terminal and restore 43rd and 44th Streets through that site because that "mall" is the antithesis of what makes NYC special? Retail and public transit in combination is EXACTLY the sort of thing that makes New York special. Running car traffic through every square inch of public space is not. The PA's plan is more true to the City. That being said, it is such a ridiculously small block, with meaningless views of nothing, that the decision will not make a difference one way or the other, except for the lucky few who will get to park their cars on that block.

  10. #2260

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    Well, I didn't think Silverstein would have the resources to build out the entire site, but I figured he would complete tower two. Since that has more build flexibility than the FT and probably more marketable, I can understand if he is pissed.

  11. #2261

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    Quote Originally Posted by BPC
    So should we bulldoze Grand Central Terminal and restore 43rd and 44th Streets through that site because that "mall" is the antithesis of what makes NYC special?
    That's at least the second time you've tried to make that weak argument - almost word for word.

  12. #2262
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    Quote Originally Posted by NY Times
    ...the governor may be reluctant to alienate Mr. Silverstein and delay the April groundbreaking for the Freedom Tower, which is expected to draw national attention, helping his presidential aspirations.
    This hack has grabbed this project by the horns, trying to ride it to higher office.

    Such delusion might be perfect for life in D.C. -- but the American people will buck him off, somewhere on the outskirts of Iowa.

  13. #2263

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    Quote Originally Posted by greenie
    That's at least the second time you've tried to make that weak argument - almost word for word.
    That's because it is a perfect analogy, and no one has provided an intelligent answer to it. Just a bunch of fluff about "malls," as if the mere use of the word resolves any issue as to whether cars should be returned to Cortland Street. Silly.

  14. #2264

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    You have used the same argument at least three times. I thought I provided a satisfactory answer.
    Me
    You
    Me

    I still think either option would work, and the problem is overblown.

    STREETLOVER: The Calatrava hub is a mall.

  15. #2265

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    I guess I never really understood your explanation, Zippy, which was this:

    "The fact that GCT works (and it does) has no correlation to an enclosed Cortlandt St. Apples and oranges. GCT is an intermodal space with numerous choices within. Even if you don't like it, you still have to go there for Metro North. A Cortlandt St passageway will be just that, a passageway. In one way, out the other. If thru-traffic is not encouraged, it could become dead mall space."

    The PA's Cortland Street design is intended as a retail concourse which will aso serve as an appendage to both subways and commuter train stations, exactly like the retail concourses that protrude in every direction from the GCT center. The Mayor and his flunkies seem to be missing this fact. While it is correct, as you point out, that you have to go through GCT to get to MetroNorth, you don't have to go through any particular retail concourse to get there. Similarly, you will not HAVE TO go through Courtland Street to get to the Path or subways, but if it is designed as well as GCT, you WILL.

    That is why GCT is not only a good analogy, it is in some ways the ONLY good analogy here. The Courtland Street retail concourse will sit atop a major grouping of public transportation sources. Thus, to understand what will work and what won't for that site, you can't look at ordinary NYC streets. You have to look at other comparable sites, and the most comparable such site in all Manhattan is on Park Avenue between 42nd and 44th Streets. No other site even comes close in terms of similarity. If mine is an apples to oranges comparison, yours is an apples to monkeys comparison. If we were designing Park between 42 and 44 today, "STREETLOVER" and others would be lobbying for car traffic to go right through it, and we would have lost the chance to built something better for persons who use public transit (who should take priority over persons who have brought their cars into the City). The same is true at the WTC Site.

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