View Poll Results: Construction is underway, how do you feel about the final design for the WTC site?

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  • I am more than satisfied; I believe that the final design surpasses that of the original World Trade Center. 10/10

    50 26.04%
  • While nothing may ever live up to the Twin Towers, I am wholly satisfied with the new World Trade Center; it is a new symbol for a new era. 7/10

    55 28.65%
  • I have come to terms with the new World Trade Center; although it has a number of flaws, I find the design to be acceptable. 5/10

    48 25.00%
  • I am wholly disappointed with the New World Trade Center; we will live to regret the final design. 0/10

    22 11.46%
  • I am biased, but honest, and hate anything that is not a reincarnation of the original Twin Towers.

    17 8.85%
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Thread: World Trade Center Developments

  1. #4576
    Forum Veteran Daquan13's Avatar
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    I'm almost certain that they'll have one or more of the floors reserved for HVAC units.
    Last edited by Daquan13; May 23rd, 2009 at 07:08 AM.

  2. #4577
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    There's a rendering of a "West Thames Street Pedestrian Bridge" on the SHoP website. I'm not sure how to grab the rendering, but it can be found HERE under "infrastructure." It says it will be the permanent replacement for the Rector Street Bridge. I really like this design.

  3. #4578

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    i see no reason to replace the rector st pedestrian bridge...

  4. #4579
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider View Post
    There's a rendering of a "West Thames Street Pedestrian Bridge" on the SHoP website. I'm not sure how to grab the rendering, but it can be found HERE under "infrastructure." It says it will be the permanent replacement for the Rector Street Bridge. I really like this design.
    Here you go.
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  5. #4580
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    WSJ
    Editorial

    Saying Goodbye to Ground Zero

    By BRET STEPHENS

    In just a few weeks, The Wall Street Journal, for more than 20 years headquartered at 200 Liberty Street in lower Manhattan, packs its bags and decamps for new offices in midtown. For me, there will be much to miss about the old location: the small, nearly hidden, oval lawn surrounded by almond trees, right across the street; the fancy yachts and sleek racing sailboats that dock at nearby North Cove in summertime; the spectacular sunsets that bring out the sparkle of the languid Hudson River and manage to make Jersey City look almost beckoning.

    All that, however, is to the west of our building. To the east is the 16-acre pit of Ground Zero. It's a sight I won't miss at all.

    For nearly five years, I have looked into that pit most every working day, both from the street level and from our offices about 150 feet above it. Five years ago, after the site had been cleared of debris but before most of the reconstruction work had begun, Ground Zero still meant just two things: outrage and defiance.

    Back then, too, my memories were still fresh of what had been there before 9/11, when I'd first gone to work for the Journal in the 1990s before moving overseas: not just the Twin Towers but the gym I belonged to on the top floor of the Marriott hotel; and the Krispy Kreme donut shop that was my preferred post-workout/pre-work destination; and the little shoe repair place in the Trade Center's mall; and the DHL counter in the lobby of the South Tower, from which I had overnighted my Master's thesis to London just in time to meet the deadline.

    Back then, in other words, my emotional connection to Ground Zero was a combination of nostalgia and sadness. Also, expectation: I liked Daniel Libeskind's original design for the new World Trade Center site, with its five new towers all sharing a shard-like look that gave the whole a sense of common origin and purpose, and I looked forward to seeing them built with a sense of urgency. This was a national project, after all, a gigantic rebuke to terrorists in the form of steel and glass and one that did not require the assent of the United Nations Security Council or the pliancy of the proverbial Arab street. If my grandfathers' generation could build the Empire State Building in 14 months flat, how much longer could it possibly take, using modern methods, to build at least one of Mr. Libeskind's towers?

    Today, by contrast, my emotional connection to Ground Zero mainly involves disillusion. Disillusion with the new smorgasbord design that replaced Mr. Libeskind's, the various elements of which are testaments to the egotism of their several rock-star architects. Disillusion with the endless bickering between developer Larry Silverstein, the city and state of New York, the Port Authority, and the rest of the "stakeholders," real or self-styled, with their never-ending Demands That Must Be Met. Disillusion with the fact that today, three years after the cornerstone of the 1,776 foot Freedom Tower was laid (for a second time!), only a few steel beams rise above street level to a height of about 100 feet. Disillusion that the name "Freedom Tower" has now been dropped. Disillusion that in 2007 two firefighters, Joseph Graffagnino and Robert Beddia, died in the damaged Deutsche Bank building adjacent to Ground Zero because the Environmental Protection Agency, or whoever, wouldn't countenance the thought of simply demolishing it with a few well-placed charges of dynamite. Disillusion that it will cost more to deconstruct that squalid tower one floor at a time than it did to build it. Disillusion upon disillusion, compounded into a sense of disgust.

    Yes, I know: Rebuilding the site, as various responsible officials endlessly repeat, is a "three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle." What do they suppose the Apollo missions were? It took eight years for the U.S. to go from John F. Kennedy's 1961 man-on-the-moon speech to an actual man on the moon, a distance of about 240,000 miles. At Ground Zero, it has taken about as long to move just one corner of the site from 70 feet below ground to 100 feet above. The whole endeavor is fast turning into the American version of Barcelona's Sagrada Familia, under construction since the 1880s.

    At least Gaudi's cathedral is majestic in its incompleteness. And at least its incompleteness hints at some higher purposes, perhaps, or suggests that tracing patterns of a divine will takes time. At Ground Zero, there is a pit. With broad slabs of concrete and some rust-colored steel. Testifying to a society in which everyone gets their say and nothing gets done. To a system run by craven politicians and crass developers and an army of lawyers for whom gridlock is profit.

    A day after 9/11, my colleague Dan Henninger wrote an account of the attacks titled "I Saw It All. Then I Saw Nothing." Today, I still see nothing. Which means, maybe, that I've seen it all.

    Mr. Stephens writes the Journal's weekly Global View column. Write to bstephens@wsj.com .


  6. #4581
    Senior Member Bob's Avatar
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    The essay by Mr. Stephens is downright brilliant. I particularly thought his comment about everybody having a say, but nothing gets done, was right on the mark.

  7. #4582

    Default So Sad but so True

    As Gehry's 8 Spruce St - a private development- rises defiantly in the background.

  8. #4583

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    Quote Originally Posted by philvia View Post
    i see no reason to replace the rector st pedestrian bridge...
    1/The Rector St bridge wasn't designed to be permanent. It's already been patched up to extend its life.

    2. The east pier interferes with the sidewalk.

    3. It's at the wrong place. The West Thames pedestrian crossing is busy, and because of the BBT, dangerous. It's a more logical place for a bridge.

  9. #4584
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    Real Estate Weekly

    CBRE releases downtown study that predicts strong rents for WTC buildings

    Daniel Geiger
    5/22/2009

    Study counters competing projections by rival firm Cushman & Wakefield

    While World Trade Center stakeholders gathered yesterday at the behest of Mayor Bloomberg to attempt sorting out the budding imbroglio there, developer Larry Silverstein continued to make his case for building speculative office towers – disseminating a new report that predicts his plan to deliver a soaring new skyscraper on the site by 2015 would be met by favorable market conditions.

    That goes against a competing study commissioned in recent months by the Port Authority from the real estate services firm Cushman & Wakefield, which projects insufficient demand for two of the three buildings Silverstein wants to develop until 2026 and 2037.


    The authority has used that analysis as a key component in rationalizing its refusal to backstop financing for the towers, a commitment Silverstein has asked the authority to make because he can’t raise the money privately due to ongoing problems in the credit markets.

    Silverstein’s camp has called the authority’s study pessimistic and has expressed outrage that the Port Authority would spend billions of dollars on infrastructure on the site without helping to see the development of a substantial commercial component that could profit from it.

    Coinciding with the meeting yesterday, held at Gracie Mansion and attended by the authority, Silverstein, Governor Corzine, Governor Paterson, Mayor Bloomberg and Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, Silverstein’s firm emailed around the competing study, which was done by CB Richard Ellis, one of Cushman & Wakefield’s chief rivals.

    The report predicts that Tower 2, a 2.5 million square foot skyscraper with a distinct slanted crown, would likely be able to net rents between $91 per square foot and $107 per square foot by 2015 and that Tower 4, a building already under construction on the south side of the site, would earn rents between $77 per square foot and $93 per square foot when it’s finished in 2013. The projections appear to make the buildings financially feasible.

    The report hinges on a number of speculative factors however, including a citywide layoff projection of 225,000 workers, the impact those job cuts will have on vacancy rates, downtown’s historic discount to midtown and also the premium top tier office buildings can yield over the rest of the market.

    The firm translated the layoffs into two estimates for how much space will be added to the market, projecting vacancy rates if 70 percent of the space freed up by the job cuts comes available and also if only half of it is released to the market.

    CBRE’s report predicts that Manhattan vacancy would consequently bottom out in the first quarter of 2011 between 14.3 percent and 17.4 percent and that midtown rents would average then between $53 per square foot and $64 per square foot.

    But trophy office towers and newly constructed, state of the art commercial properties command higher rents even during downturns the report stated, estimating the premium to be a whopping 85 percent.

    Using that to calculate rates in midtown’s best buildings, CBRE then took a historical average discount of about 30 percent between midtown and downtown to arrive at what it thought the World Trade Center towers could earn. The report also factored in various state and city incentives and discounts that are offered to tenants at the WTC site.

    CBRE has some interest in providing optimistic data, as it was the firm that Silverstein hired to lease 7 World Trade Center, the only tower at the site he has so far rebuilt. Silverstein also plans to use the CBRE to lease the forthcoming towers on the site that he wants to build, meaning that more buildings could lead to more business for CBRE.

    So far, the Port Authority has only offered to provide increased financial support at Tower 4, a building that has been possible to finance because both the Port Authority and the city have pledged to occupy over a million square feet in the 1.8 million square foot building.

    Silverstein has pledged that he wants to begin on Tower 2 and the other remaining WTC tower outlined in the site’s master plan, the 2 million square foot building known as Tower 3, but it appears he is willing to forgo the latter if the Port Authority will backstop Tower 2. So far, the Port Authority has said that it is unwilling to subject its balance sheet to the risks of building speculative office development in a market that doesn’t appear to need new space, although it has said that Silverstein can proceed whenever he is able to arrange financing on his own.

    But if the authority and Silverstein can’t come to an agreement, it appears that the site could become bogged back down in delays, possibly preventing the memorial from being completed by the 10th anniversary of 9/11 and also pushing back completion of the WTC transit hub.

    The Mayor’s meeting was scheduled to try to resolve the impasse. According to reports, the parties agreed to meet again next week to continue talks.

  10. #4585
    Kings County Loyal BrooklynLove's Avatar
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    CBRE, seriously.

    In other news, AAA recently released a study showing strong demand for cars.

  11. #4586
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    Yeah, I had the same reaction: Well, isn't this report conveeeeenient!

  12. #4587
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    Any brokerage with its skin in the game has a vested interest in painting a rosy picture. However, class A space will demand a premium when the economy improves. That's real estate 101. WTC7 is a prime example.

  13. #4588
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    What about Tower 5?

    The report says nothing about that one.

  14. #4589

    Default From LMDC

    May 29 – The Port Authority board voted to shuffle money from two key projects at the WTC site to the Transportation Hub. The Daily News reported $546 million from the Vehicular Security Center (VSC) and $70 million from the Cortlandt Street station will be funneled to the Hub, whose budget has spiraled to about $3.2 billion.

  15. #4590
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    Default Prince Harry Visits Ground Zero.

    The Prince of Wales Prince Harry was in New York today and visited Ground Zero - stopping to pay his respects and tribute to the many victims who died there on 09-11. He was amazed at the progress of the rebuild there.

    He then visited the Fire House where he also paid tribute to the many firefighters who lost their lives that day.

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