View Poll Results: Construction is underway, how do you feel about the final design for the WTC site?

Voters
192. You may not vote on this poll
  • I am more than satisfied; I believe that the final design surpasses that of the original World Trade Center. 10/10

    50 26.04%
  • While nothing may ever live up to the Twin Towers, I am wholly satisfied with the new World Trade Center; it is a new symbol for a new era. 7/10

    55 28.65%
  • I have come to terms with the new World Trade Center; although it has a number of flaws, I find the design to be acceptable. 5/10

    48 25.00%
  • I am wholly disappointed with the New World Trade Center; we will live to regret the final design. 0/10

    22 11.46%
  • I am biased, but honest, and hate anything that is not a reincarnation of the original Twin Towers.

    17 8.85%
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Thread: World Trade Center Developments

  1. #721
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    NY1

    Windows On The World Workers To Open New Restaurant
    SEPTEMBER 06TH, 2004

    Some former staff members of Windows on the World are opening the city's only employee-owned restaurant.

    According to Crain's New York Business, 50 workers have signed a lease to open a restaurant at 407 Greenwich Street, in a space currently occupied by Shamballa.

    The group includes waiters, cooks, busboys and dishwashers from the famed restaurant that once stood atop the World Trade Center.

    They told the New York Post they wanted to open the restaurant as a tribute to their 79 coworkers killed in the September 11, 2001, attacks.

  2. #722
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    Ground Zero: Gaping hole where towers stood is powerful landmark

    By: REBECCA MILLER - Associated Press

    For generations, visitors to New York City have headed to Times Square, the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty. But ever since Sept. 11, 2001, another landmark has been on the must-see list: The site where 2,792 people died in the attacks on the World Trade Center.

    Like it or not ---- and many native New Yorkers don't ---- ground zero pilgrimages have become a regular part of New York City tourism. Even though there's very little to actually see at the site, at any given time dozens of people from around the world can be found peering from a viewing wall into the gaping hole at the heart of the nation's tragedy. Just as the twin towers were a New York landmark, so are their ghosts.

    Some visitors take pictures or shoot videos. Others read panels depicting the history of the site and the events of Sept. 11. Some just stare in awe.

    "We wanted to see everything there is to see in New York ---- Yankee Stadium, the Statue of Liberty. Ground zero is now part of that," said Dan Leonard, 56, of Turkey Run, Ind., on vacation with his wife and children.

    "If you've seen it before and know how incredibly large it was, you can't possibly imagine it not being there," said Cindy T. Francis, 51, of Apex, N.C., who visited ground zero while attending a teachers conference.

    For those who saw the attacks on television, a visit puts things in perspective. Many people think only the twin towers were destroyed; in reality, seven buildings were.

    "Once you see it in person you get a much better idea of how big this attack was," said Cristyne Nicholas, president of NYC & Company, the city's tourism bureau.

    None of the companies that offer tours of downtown Manhattan, either by bus or on foot, specifically mention ground zero. That would be distasteful, Nicholas said.

    But, she added, "it's part of the healing process for people to see where the tragedy took place and absorb it. ... It would be an even greater tragedy if the firefighters and the New Yorkers who were lost that day were forgotten."

    Artist Andy Jurinko, who has lived near the Trade Center site for 27 years, is used to the tourists. But their presence irks him.

    Before Sept. 11, he said, they wanted to eat out and shop. Now, "they want to see the train wreck, they want to touch the horror.

    "Standing right outside my office here, they come stand by the wall and have their picture taken. It's like Disneyland," he said.

    He looks forward to the day when people have a proper memorial to visit. "They say they want to pay respect, but sometimes paying respect is staying the hell away," he said.

    Demand from visitors to see the site was so strong during the six-month cleanup after the attacks that the city built special viewing platforms and issued over a million passes to them. The platforms are closed now that visitors can walk around most of the perimeter.

    City life continues to bustle around the 16-acre zone. Financial sector employees whiz by en route to the subway; vendors hawk framed photos of the twin towers. Some days, an elderly man sits on the sidewalk playing patriotic songs on a flute.

    Inside the 13-foot high wall, which consists of a series of galvanized mesh panels that people can look through, crews work to remove ruins of a parking garage and to shore up the 70-foot-deep foundation for a new skyscraper.

    The Freedom Tower will be 1,776 feet ---- the tallest building in the world. When it is ready in 2009, the twisting glass and steel tower, topped by a 276-foot spire designed to evoke the Statue of Liberty, will include 60 stories of office space, 10 stories of retail space, an observation deck and energy-generating windmills.

    Twisted steel beams and a wall that is the only surviving remnant of the original complex will be preserved in an underground interpretive center.

    The 20-ton cornerstone for the Freedom Tower is nearly undetectable amid the construction vehicles, ramps and barrels. Its inscription reads, "To honor and remember those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001 and as a tribute to the enduring spirit of freedom ---- July Fourth, 2004."

    Construction is also planned for a permanent memorial that will transform the twin towers' footprints into reflecting pools of water. The memorial, called "Reflecting Absence," will place the names of all the Sept. 11 victims randomly around the pools. The memorial also will pay tribute to the six victims of the 1993 bombing of the trade center.

    Meanwhile, an interim memorial can be found in Battery Park at the tip of Lower Manhattan, five minutes from ground zero.

    The Sphere, a 12-foot high bronze and steel sculpture, sat atop the fountain of the World Trade Center plaza for three decades. It was originally dedicated as a monument to world peace through trade.

    When the towers fell, the globe-like sculpture was gashed through the top but remained intact. It was dug from the rubble and moved to Battery Park in March 2002. An eternal flame, small American flags, floral bouquets and a wreath adorn the site.

    Steps away is The Skyscraper Museum, which contains a 7-foot-tall original model of the World Trade Center on loan from The Octagon Museum in Washington, D.C.

    The plastic, wood and cardboard model was used from 1969 to 1971 for architectural presentations as the buildings were being designed. The model sat unnoticed and deteriorating in a warehouse for years but was restored after the attacks.

    Models of the Freedom Tower and "Reflecting Absence" can be seen at The Winter Garden, the glass atrium at the World Financial Center. It also contains a timeline detailing the work of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, the agency responsible for rebuilding the site.

    The Winter Garden had to be rebuilt before the exhibit opened; it, too, was destroyed in the attack.

    One building that escaped damage when the towers fell was St. Paul's Chapel, the oldest church in Manhattan, located directly across the street.

    For nine months, St. Paul's served as a shelter where rescue workers ate, slept, bathed and grieved. Passers-by draped tributes and flowers on its iron fence; families plastered it with fliers asking about missing loved ones who never came home.

    Hundreds of those artifacts are displayed in the church in "The Unwavering Spirit: Hope and Healing at Ground Zero," an exhibit about the rescuers and the volunteers who nurtured them. The exhibit includes interviews, photos, drawings, letters, flags and banners from across the world as well as origami paper cranes, a Japanese symbol of peace.

    Exhibits at the city's fire and police museums include similar artifacts as well as the stories of officers who died Sept. 11 ---- 343 from the Fire Department, 23 from the New York City Police Department and 37 from the Port Authority Police Department.

    Of particular interest at the police museum is a life-size reproduction of officers and officials scouring 1.8 million tons of ground zero debris for anything to help identify victims.

    Francis, the tourist from North Carolina, understands why her presence might upset some New Yorkers. But "it's not like people who stop to see a car accident," she said.

    "I don't think people come here to gawk," she added. "They come to pay respect to our nation and the people who were killed here. It's a tribute to our fallen comrades."

  3. #723

    Default Documentry - Battle for Ground Zero

    Interesting documentry on TV over here (UK) last night on the squabbles between Libeskind & Childs and the Freedom Tower.

    What do you guys think of the design and planned restoration of the site - I had seen a twisting tower design, which I thought (no expert) looked awesome.

    Thoughts anyone ??

  4. #724

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    I'm already tired of the battle, and we haven't seen the results yet. But there is a program airing tonight (PBS - 9pm) on the subject.

  5. #725
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    wait tonight at 9...PBS? Freedom tower??? cool

  6. #726

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    The site has not developed the way I originally thought it would. It has all the right pieces, and will probably function very well; but there is nothing spectacular about it, except the transportation center, which I think will be grand - and the only thing so far not born out of a "competition."

  7. #727

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    Quote Originally Posted by tonyo
    NY1

    Windows On The World Workers To Open New Restaurant
    SEPTEMBER 06TH, 2004

    Some former staff members of Windows on the World are opening the city's only employee-owned restaurant.

    According to Crain's New York Business, 50 workers have signed a lease to open a restaurant at 407 Greenwich Street, in a space currently occupied by Shamballa.

    The group includes waiters, cooks, busboys and dishwashers from the famed restaurant that once stood atop the World Trade Center.

    They told the New York Post they wanted to open the restaurant as a tribute to their 79 coworkers killed in the September 11, 2001, attacks.
    Good for them. I hope they succeed. Nonetheless, it is worth noting that service at the old Windows on the World was not its strong suit.

  8. #728
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    Yeah... my father used to be director of proms and stuff at his school, one year he had it at WotW. He said they were kind of rude and uncooperative.

  9. #729
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    More on Project Rebirth......


    September 8, 2004

    Ground Zero, the Long View

    By SARAH BOXER


    In the fall of 2001 when the dust and ash from the World Trade Center were still in the air, Jim Whitaker, a documentary filmmaker, decided to photograph everything happening at ground zero. By the spring of 2002 three cameras were pointed at the pit, each taking one shot every five minutes, round the clock. Months later, three more cameras were added.

    That was the beginning of Project Rebirth, a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating a historical record of the rebuilding.

    Today www.projectrebirth.org, a Web site produced with the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and AOL , opens for public viewing. The site includes links to the architects who are building at ground zero; profiles of 10 people whose lives were altered by Sept. 11; an interview with Kevin Rampe, the president of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation; the view from a live Web camera at the site; and a timeline that you can click on to watch short movies of milestone events there.

    But the main attraction is the time-lapse photography, showing (on a very tiny screen, 3 inches by 2 inches) what the six cameras have been seeing all along. Each camera has a distinctive view and a different reason for being there.

    One camera, on the roof of 30 Vesey Street, at the corner of Church Street, gives a wide view down from the northeast corner of ground zero. The weather comes right at the camera: rain, mist and snow. And the shadows from the buildings nearby often upstage the activity in the pit.

    Another camera is 47 stories up, in the American Express Building at 3 World Financial Center at the northwest corner of the site. It "has an omniscience to it," Mr. Whitaker, the director of Project Rebirth, said.

    So far this camera has provided the most complete view. You can watch the PATH station going up: the girders, the tracks, the first layer, the second layer. And when the Freedom Tower starts to rise, Mr. Whitaker promised, it will look as if the new building were heading right for the camera. As the tower ascends above the lens, the camera will tilt up to watch.

    The camera on the roof of 115 Broadway, the current home of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, is at the southeast corner of ground zero. Because you can see the building's old stone parapets, the pictures from this camera have a nostalgic feel. The snow accumulates and melts on the stonework while the construction unfolds beyond it.

    But the grandest view comes from the southwest corner. Here a Vista Vision camera, the very camera that Cecil B. DeMille used to film "The Ten Commandments," is perched on the ninth floor of the Dow Jones Building, where there is a memorial for Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal reporter abducted and killed in Pakistan in the aftermath of Sept. 11. The picture is crisp and very wide. "You see New York life passing by, cruising by," Mr. Whitaker said. The shots hum with traffic and cloud drift.

    That covers the four corners of the site. What was missing, said Thomas Lappin, the director of photography for Project Rebirth, was a camera at ground level to show "the human scale." So a camera was planted 18 inches off the ground in the graveyard behind St. Paul's Church. Its pictures are filled with tombstones, trees and sky.

    "It's a little reprieve from the full site, the big wound," Mr. Lappin said.

    Another close-up camera was installed on the roof of the firehouse that was closest to the World Trade Center: Engine 10, Ladder 10. Nicknamed "1010," the camera is there partly for symbolic purposes, Mr. Whitaker said, to represent the "heroism of the firehouse." It also shows details well: girders going up, cranes turning crazily round and round and a flag flapping in the foreground.

    That same firehouse perch is now also being shared by a digital Webcam that has just been installed.

    Originally, Mr. Whitaker said, he planned to photograph at ground zero for seven years, but now he thinks he will keep the cameras running for at least 10, at a cost of some $8 million (and this is with the film being donated by Kodak and the processing by Deluxe). He said he was hoping that Project Rebirth would be one of the institutions represented at the World Trade Center site. If it is, he wants to install six screens in one room so that viewers can see the whole building process from all six angles over the course of 20 minutes.

    If not, though, no shot will be lost. Mr. Whitaker, the president of Imagine Entertainment, the movie production company founded by Ron Howard and Brian Grazer, plans to make a documentary with the time-lapse footage. (You can watch a trailer of the movie at the Web site.) And eventually everything that the six cameras have seen, millions of feet of film, he said, will go to the Library of Congress.

    At first Mr. Whitaker approached ground zero with dread and anxiety, he said. But when he saw the pile of rubble visibly diminish in a matter of days, he started feeling more optimistic. He wanted to capture that feeling, he said, and the speed with which the cleanup was taking place. Time-lapse photography was the ticket.

    What is most striking now from the time-lapse view, though, is just how slow the rebuilding has been. The days, the weeks, the snow, the rain, the shadows, the day, the night, the traffic, the seasons all pass. Meanwhile the pit remains. It is the most stable thing in the pictures. And that is the view that has been edited for the Web site. The unedited dailies, Mr. Lappin said, are "incredibly repetitive."


    A view of ground zero from the Project Rebirth time-lapse camera 47 stories up on the American Express Building, at the northwest corner of the site, taken in autumn 2003.

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  10. #730
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    Nick Rosen, producer of the Frontline documentary "Sacred Ground" held a web chat this morning at WashingtonPost.com. Here is the transcript:

    Nick Rosen: I hope that this program helps re-ignite a debate about what should be built at Ground Zero because public participation has lessened in recent months. The building is highly symbolic and it would be a shame if people turned around in two years time to find they were unhappy with the decisions that had been made in their absence.

    _______________________

    Wheaton, Md.: Has a final plan been approved? When should we expect to see a completed project?

    Nick Rosen: Yes, the final plan has largely been approved. The governor's unveiling on Dec. 19 represented an important milestone. Since then the shape of the building and it's precise location on the site do continue to develop. And although very early work on the foundations has begun, change is still possible. It is not unlikely that the building we see in two years time will differ markedly from the one unveiled on Dec. 19th.

    _______________________

    Washington, D.C.: Has any thought been given to the idea that many people will be afraid to work in a skycraper in New York given what did happen on 9/11? I know office space is very limited in Manhattan and that plenty of companies would relocate to the new towers, but do you seriously think you'd have 100 percent capacity?

    Nick Rosen: Developer Larry Silverstein is in a paradoxical position. He is obligated to rebuild under the terms of his lease, but he knows perfectly well -- although he cannot say so -- that tenants will be hard to find.

    The old WOrld Trade Center was not a commercial success for the first decade of its existence. And the fear factor will be hard to overcome in seeking tenants for the new building. Much will be made of the safety features, but peoples' emotions are not ruled by rationality.

    _______________________

    Phoenix, Ariz.: Not only is was the final model of the Freedom Tower not as good as the one in Libeskind's master plan, but it doesn't even resemble his design at all. Do you think this has resulted in Libeskind feeling as though he had nothing to do with the process? That is how I would feel.

    Nick Rosen: He is an amazing, resiliant guy and he and his wife Nina are both realists. They know Larry Silverstein had other priorities than fulfilling his artistic vision and they are aware that David Childs is himself a highly accomplished architect. Therefore, I think they can feel good about what they achieved whilst accepting the others' point of view. Daniel managed to keep the towers' height at the symbolic 1,776 feet he had set. And although the building that was unveiled had a rather stunted version of his proposed inverted (eccentric) tower, it did at least acknowledge Libeskind's design.

    Libeskind is still part of the process and he is hoping to win the competition to design the freedom museum, which will also be built on the site of Ground Zero.

    By the way, the key decision-maker in that museum is Roland Betts, who as you could see on last night's show favors Libeskind.

    _______________________

    Anonymous: I always thought that a simple park would have been the best use of ground zero.

    Was that ever seriously considered?

    Nick Rosen: The decision to build was made very quickly. Some would say too quickly. Luminaries, such as Rudy Guiliani argued vehemently that nothing be built on Ground Zero. And certainly as a close observer, I was surprised at the speed with which the decision to rebuild was taken.

    But look at the forces pushing for a decision: the developer with his fresh 99-year lease, wanted to get the revenues flowing again; the Port Authority which lost almost 100 of its staff on 9/11 was also clear-headed in wanting a rebuilding kind of memorial. And I think in Washington, it was felt that the national interest dictated that a defiant tower was the best way of sending out a message to the world: business as usual -- American business -- was not going to be dictated by terrorists.

    _______________________

    Reston, Va.: Did the Governor have a legal right to get involved in the design, or was he using the bully pulpit? Also, why was he more involved than the mayor of New York?

    Nick Rosen: That's a good question. In a way he filled a political vacuum, or rather, somebody had to take the lead and it served his political interests to do so. Much of the federal funding that arrived after 9/11 was funnelled through the state rather than the city, which explains Mayor Bloomberg's passive role. The Port Authority is very much a tool of the New York governor and always has been. So in the end, the only check on Pataki's authority came from the developer, Larry Silverstein. And the battle of egos between Childs and Lebeskind reflected a tussle between Pataki and Silverstein.

    Bloomberg was kept fully informed as key decisions were made. The final decision to cut the size of the tower by sevearal hundred feet, which led to Guy Nordenson's resignation, was made, I am told, by Pataki while he visited the Bermuda weekend home of Michael Bloomberg.

    _______________________

    New York, N.Y.: I am not an expert in real estate. My question is why does Larry Silverstein have so much power, as seen by the way he is muscling his way through the whole process? He is the leaseholder of the WTC, not the owner; that would be the Port Authority.

    In my layman's way of thinking, that would give him less say than the PA.

    Nick Rosen: That's America. The guy with the lease and the insurance policy, the guy with the money, gets to make the decisions. The Port Authority had sold the lease to Silverstein because it wanted out of the real estate business and preferred to focus on airports and tunnels. So for the PA to get back into real estate so soon was not on their agenda.

    Plus, like everybody else connected with this venture, Mr. Silverstein understandably wanted his place in history. To build the world's tallest building is quite a memorial for a 72-year-old property developer.

    _______________________

    Greenbelt, Md.: "Sacred ground?" Not anymore. The recent Republican Convention contaminated the site more surely than the asbestos, mercury and other hazardous materials there ever could. 9/11 is now nothing more than a campaign prop, and it's a sad commentary on our political system.

    Nick Rosen: As I said in my introduction, it's up to the people of New York, America and the world to bring about the outcome they desire on the site of Ground Zero.

    The events leading up to the competition which was won by Lebeskind, shows that if the public speaks, speaks loudly, and speaks with one voice, then it will be heard.

    Part of the problem is that the families and the public became slowly disunited as factionalism and individual politicking began to detract from the idealistic spirit that prevailed immediately after 9/11.

    _______________________

    London, U.K.: I watched this film on Channel 4 the other night and was impressed by the way in which it was directed, the way in which every shot counted -- from the tiny Libeskind being crowded out by microphones at a presser, to the zoom out of Libeskind on the Ground Zero site, and the cross cutting between one of the victims pouring a cup of tea for his sister on the sacred ground with the cacophony of voices and big close-ups of mouths at a press conference in the final sequence of the film.

    Will the director be available to comment on how he arrived at this visualisation?

    Nick Rosen: Thank you very much for that complement. I agree entirely. Speaking on behalf of the director with whom I worked closely on the year this took to research and film, I can tell you we shot far more than we could use and we always felt that we were trying to make a feature film out of this epic story.

    _______________________

    Tampa, Fla.: Back in July of 2002 the general public rejected the LMDC's preliminary Beyer Blinder Belle concepts. In response the LMDC held a design competition to find more exciting plans for the site. After Libeskind's design won, David Childs shaped it towards a more ordinary, practical direction to the point that the latest Libeskind/Childs plan and the Beyer Blinder Belle plans look nearly identical when compared. It seems like we are back to square one with a plan that the public rejected. Have you noticed that similarity, and what do you think of it?

    Nick Rosen: It is true that there is a similarity between the plans the public rejected and the ones we have now. In a way, BBB were the victims of the high emotions at that time. But also they failed to gauge the public mood or capture the public imagination, both areas where Lebiskind scored very high marks.

    The BBB blowout did not include any design elements. It was simply a set of (dummy) buildings indicating scale and location relative to each other. It was always obvious to me, from the moment the competition finalists were announced, that the winner would be Daniel Lebiskind, because he gave New Yorkers what they needed at that time. I think that is why the governor supported him so strongly.

    _______________________

    Pittsburgh, Pa.: It seemed to me that the program portrayed David Childs as the "bad guy" in the tug-of-war between he and Libeskind. Was he really as much of a son of a you-know-what as he was portrayed? Why didn't Pataki just pull him off the project?

    Nick Rosen: Oh dear, Mr. Childs really isn't a bad guy and I'm surprised it seemed that way. It is true, however, that we did not get as much time with Mr. Childs as we needed or would have liked. The issue of access is always critical in documentary films and both Mr. Childs and Mr. Silverstein were both busy and continually being harassed by other media for the whole period we were making our documentary. As a result, the little human moments that can illuminate a character were absent in our portrayal of both Mr. Childs and Mr. Silverstein. I wish we had been able to get some "quality time" with them, but I am sure that the next film -- ahem -- which follows the actual building and engineering story will redress the balance.

    In a way Mr. Childs had the more difficult job because he had to take the design and rhetoric bequethed by the Lebiskind master plan and turn it into a working, successful, profitable district of lower Manhattan. Needless to say, it is a commission that every architect in the world would do anything for. But Mr. Childs is the one who got it and he has made great steps towards producing a building which is both innovative and iconic. However, it is in the nature of architecture that any individual architect will want to stamp his or her identity on a building. And I do not think we have seen the end of the design development process.

    _______________________

    Milford, Conn.: Why can't the Gardner design still be a viable option, no one want's this "Twisted" 70 story building with windmills in NYC.

    Nick Rosen: I'm not sure what you mean by the Gardner design, but there's still an opportunity for New Yorkers and others who care what happens at Ground Zero to make their opinions known. The Freedom Tower, if built, will briefly be the world's tallest building, but it is only one element on the site of the former WTC. There is a separate memorial being planned -- a memorial within a memorial if you like -- a Freedom museum and an arts complex and other buildings above ground as well as a considerable below-ground complex.

    As I said before, I do hope this program can restart the public dialogue that was so important in the early stages.

    _______________________

    Flagstaff, Ariz.: Congratulations on an informative program. However, it seems you started out with a bias, entranced by Dani-elle's stylish glasses and seeping poetic pronouncements. Yeesh, this guys ego is off the charts. It looked to me like a hatchet job on Silverstein and Childs. Yes, developers do have a lot of power - to shape comunities through their substantial investments and risk taking. If you want to play, you have to cooperate, sometning Liebskind, wife and lawyer were not willing to do.

    Nick Rosen: I recognize your criticism and it is a shame that top businessmen, developers and the like are so shielded from the media. I feel sure that if we had more intimate portaits of Mr. Childs and Mr. Silverstein than they would have come accross more sympathetically, but we had to fight hard for the time they generously gave us in the end. Lebiskind camp -- both Daniel and his dream team of his wife Nina and his lawyer Ed Hayes -- made themselves very available. Therefore, it became inevitable that we would tell the story more from the Lebiskind viewpoint than from the Silverstein viewpoint. I hope the next film will be able to show what it is like inside the mind of a leading developer and a top corporate architect.

    _______________________

    Glen, N.H.: Has there been any consideration of further involvement by Rafael Vinoly and his team who actually won the official jury competition face-off with Daniel Libeskind (according to the New York Times as mentioned in your report)?

    Nick Rosen: Rafael Vinoly and his collaborator, Frederic Shwartz, are both superb architects who were devastated when their victory was pulled away from under them. Both have gone on to do other great designs since -- Mr. Shwartz recently won the competition to design the New Jersey memorial.

    _______________________

    Brooklyn, N.Y.: Why did you leave out the fact that in every public opinion poll ever taken, the Libeskind design was soundly rejected, and that his proposal was actually submitted after the design deadline had passed?

    Nick Rosen: I don't think it is correct that his proposal was submitted late, although he was a late addition to the list of those invited to compete. As to his design, no single proposal won an overwhelming majority, but at the time, his captured the imagination of the people who had chosen to involve themselves in the debate. Since then public participation has fallen away, so the importance of opinion polls has lessened. If the public would become re-involved their voice would count for more.

    _______________________

    Toledo, Ohio: What role, if any, did the 9/11 victim's families play in the the design of the Freedom Tower?

    Nick Rosen: The victims' families had a lesser role than you might have imagined. There were one or two on the panel which chose the memorial design, the twin pools, but people I spoke to on the memorial jury said that in the end they were led by the experts to pick what many now feel is a very bland design. As regards the design and location of the freedom tower, the victims families had one big problem -- they never really agreed amongst themselves. There was a great deal of jockeying for position among the family spokespersons, and to this day there is huge bitterness and rivalry between the various family groups. So, in the end, the main acheivement of the families was to prevent very much building on the footprints of the two towers, although there has been some building. The main occupation of the chief executive of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, Kevin Rampe, is to coax and coerce the families and the local media to overlook these deviations from the promises that were made shortly after the disaster.

    _______________________

    London Ontario Canada: Why didn't Liebskind take his frustrations over being frozen out of the design process public, when it might have done some good?

    Nick Rosen: I think that Daniel Lebiskind would have gone public if he felt he had been completely frozen out, but even at the lowest points he felt there was still something to fight for. If he had gone public it would have been seen by insiders as throwing in the towel. He and Nina decided to stay inside the tent and their prize was the governor's decision to reject the proposal from Silverstein Properties for a taller tower with no antenna at the side.

    _______________________

    Washington, DC: Did Libeskind benefit at all from having a lawyer? I'm thinking specifically of the 51%/49% agreement. It sounds like he definitely got the short end of the stick in this compromise.

    Nick Rosen: Studio Lebiskind has perhaps 30-40 staff and he was up against the Port Authority, the LMDC and, of course, the muscle of SOM architects. Plus, the Lebiskinds were outsiders who had arrived in New York only after winning the competition. Ed Hayes did a huge amount to ensure that the Lebiskinds survived in the rough and tumble of the PR game and the political lobbying that became a daily part of the design process. Ed Hayes knows so many people in New York -- from police chiefs to construction workers to the governor himself. I don't think they would have got as far as they did without him.

    _______________________

    Fulton, Md.: As an architect, immigrant, and one who grew up in NYC watching the construction of the towers as a child, I was embarrassed by the conduct of the architect from SOM. Architecture should be a cooperative collaboration between various and sometimes opposing parties. No one is perfect, but I compliment the vision, effort, and original design by Daniel Libeskind for its purpose! Architecture is not autocratic!

    Nick Rosen: There was so much at stake in the Freedom Tower and you can understand any architect's intense desire to be the one remembered as the designer of what I think will turn out to be an extraordinary building.

    _______________________

    Nick Rosen: I hope that this debate will continue long after the program is forgotten about and if anyone would like to make further comments, please e-mail me at nick@vivum.net.

  11. #731

    Default

    Tonyo, thanks for posting that transcript!

    Interesting that the idea of incorporating Vinoly and Schwartz's plan was raised. ...Even more interesting that Rosen dodged the question!

    How about that description of the PA - as a "tool" - and also the description of the LMDC trying to "coax and coerce" the local media? I wonder how Rosen would describe himself...

  12. #732
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    It's that time of year again....did anyone see the twin beacons were lit last night? Well, one was anyway - the other was off and on, from my perspective. It looked like they eminated from a different location though.....Zippy, BPC, anyone from downtown notice otherwise?

    From last year:





  13. #733
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    I didn't know they were back.. I'll look tonight, the clouds might give some good reflection.

  14. #734

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    Quote Originally Posted by NYatKNIGHT
    It's that time of year again....did anyone see the twin beacons were lit last night? Well, one was anyway - the other was off and on, from my perspective. It looked like they eminated from a different location though.....Zippy, BPC, anyone from downtown notice otherwise?
    A rehearsal, perhaps. The last that I heard on the subject is that funds have been committed to relight the beams for one evening only (9/11) during each of the next 3 years.

  15. #735

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    I've seen them shining every night since Sunday night. I assume this is being done for the entire week of September 11. I haven't walked over to see where the lights are set up this year; past years were in the lot in front of the cinemas (soon to be the site of the Goldman Sachs HQ). I will walk the dog over that way tonight and check it out.

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