View Poll Results: Construction is underway, how do you feel about the final design for the WTC site?

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  • I am more than satisfied; I believe that the final design surpasses that of the original World Trade Center. 10/10

    50 26.04%
  • While nothing may ever live up to the Twin Towers, I am wholly satisfied with the new World Trade Center; it is a new symbol for a new era. 7/10

    55 28.65%
  • I have come to terms with the new World Trade Center; although it has a number of flaws, I find the design to be acceptable. 5/10

    48 25.00%
  • I am wholly disappointed with the New World Trade Center; we will live to regret the final design. 0/10

    22 11.46%
  • I am biased, but honest, and hate anything that is not a reincarnation of the original Twin Towers.

    17 8.85%
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Thread: World Trade Center Developments

  1. #991

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob
    Why not just make it 2001?
    How about 2000 ft, 9 inch, 11 mm.

  2. #992

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    Quote Originally Posted by jjim
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob
    Why not just make it 2001?
    How about 2000 ft, 9 inch, 11 mm.
    Why not 1500 Ft occupied office building (100 Floors, 6 Million Sq Feet) and another 300 Ft of transparent building and then the spire extends another 200 Ft. (Office)

    Then here's how the other buildings should play out:

    Tower 2 and 3: 1200 Ft, 80 floors, 4 million Sq Feet each (Office)

    Tower 4 and 5: 900 Ft, 60 Floors, 3 Million Sq Feet each (Office)

  3. #993
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    That would rule!

  4. #994

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    Did they remove the large gate around the pit, and replace it with the low railing that's in that pic above?

  5. #995

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    January 22, 2005

    Leading Donors to Pataki PAC in 2004 Included Developers of Ground Zero

    By PATRICK D. HEALY

    A political action committee set up to burnish Gov. George E. Pataki's national reputation gathered more than $1 million in 2004, and among the biggest donors were four business leaders or officials heavily involved in rebuilding ground zero.

    While leading real estate investors often contribute to political officials, these developers made unusually large donations of $25,000 each to the committee, which was created in Virginia to avoid New York State campaign finance limits. Given that the money to the committee came from people with major interests in the redevelopment of ground zero - viewed as sacred space by families who lost loved ones in the 9/11 attack - this intersection between money and politics could prove especially delicate.

    "I think it's despicable that people involved in rebuilding the World Trade Center would go outside the state and make these kind of huge donations to the governor, who's supposed to be guarding the interests of ground zero," said Monica Gabrielle, whose husband, Richard, was killed when the south tower collapsed, and who has been critical of Mr. Pataki's stewardship of the site. "Ground zero is not the place to be lining pockets."

    Kevin Quinn, a spokesman for Mr. Pataki, said yesterday that the 21st Century Freedom PAC was created six years ago to pay for travel, events, donations and other activities by the governor to support Republican candidates. Mr. Quinn said that donors did not enjoy any special favor or access with the executive branch.

    "Any decisions that we make are based solely on the merits, on sound public policy, and on what is in the best interests of New Yorkers," he said.

    Mr. Pataki has taken an intensive role in the redevelopment of ground zero, going so far as to involve himself in the selection of final designs for the site.

    The donors are Daniel R. Tishman and John L. Tishman, who each gave $25,000 last month and are executives with Tishman Realty and Construction, which is building 7 World Trade Center; John C. Whitehead, whom Mr. Pataki tapped to be chairman of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation; and Lloyd Goldman, a partner in developing 7 World Trade Center.

    The Tishmans were not available for comment yesterday, but a spokesman, Richard Kielar, said their donations had "no connection to downtown projects." Some of the PAC filings were first reported yesterday by The New York Post.

    "The Tishmans gave to the George Pataki PAC because he is one of the leading environmentalist governors in the United States," Mr. Kielar said. "Tishman is a 107-year-old private company that does mostly private-sector work, but whether it's private or public, we compete fairly and squarely for it."

    Mr. Whitehead and Mr. Goldman did not return calls seeking comment yesterday.

    It was unclear yesterday if aides to Mr. Pataki directly requested the donations, or if the donors gave on their own initiative. The largest donation to his fund last year was $75,000 from the New York-based Altria Corporate Services, part of the tobacco giant Altria Group.

    The governor's committee asked for a contribution from Altria to help finance Mr. Pataki's activities at the Republican National Convention last summer, according to Dawn Schneider, an Altria spokeswoman.

    Ms. Schneider said yesterday that she could not confirm if the Pataki fund had requested the specific amount of $75,000 from Altria, the parent company of Philip Morris USA and Kraft Foods. The money was used to pay for a hospitality suite for Mr. Pataki and his guests near Madison Square Garden during convention week.

    The Altria gift drew criticism yesterday from some government watchdogs.

    The New York Public Interest Research Group said that Mr. Pataki's newly proposed state budget for 2005-6 called for a cap of $100 million on the amount of a bond tobacco companies would put up if they lost a lawsuit in the state. "Not to overuse the metaphor, but it turns out that where there's smoke, there's fire," said Blair Horner, a lobbyist for the research group. "We were surprised that Altria would make a $75,000 donation to the governor of the state that has the toughest anti-smoking law, one of the highest cigarette taxes, and the only state that requires cigarettes to meet fire safety standards. This bill looks like a gift to the tobacco industry."

    Ms. Schneider said that Altria "would certainly support" the $100 million cap, but added that the company's donation practices were unrelated to its public policy goals.

    Mr. Quinn said the goal of the proposal was to protect taxpayers' interests in case of a bankruptcy by the tobacco industry, which is now paying billions of dollars to the state as a result of the national tobacco settlement. He said other states had proposed or enacted similar caps.

    Advocates of campaign finance reform expressed concern yesterday at the backgrounds and generosity of many of Mr. Pataki's donors, especially those involved in ground zero, contending that the money created at least the appearance of donors currying favor with the governor for their projects. "We see these sort of out-of-state PAC's as slush funds that are all about George Pataki's national image but raise questions about 'pay-to-play' for big-money donors who obviously want to be on the governor's good side," said Rachel Leon, executive director of Common Cause New York, a nonpartisan watchdog group.

    Aides to the governor said there was nothing unusual or inappropriate about Mr. Pataki's committee, which raised $1.1 million in 2004.

    "It's structured in the same fashion as dozens of other similar PAC's created by other elected officials for the same purpose," Mr. Quinn said.

    The fund also received $25,000 donations from Stanley F. Druckenmiller, founder of Duquesne Capital Management; the real estate developer Michael J. Chasanoff; Stephen Schwarzman of the Blackstone Group, a private equity firm; and Francesco Galesi, a longtime Pataki ally and chairman of the Galesi Group, a real estate developer. A former WorldCom director, Mr. Galesi is currently a defendant in a class-action lawsuit by investors.

    The fund raised $622,688 in the last six months of 2004, yet spent so heavily on consultant fees that it had an ending balance of $179,256, according to campaign finance documents. The firm Mercury Public Affairs, which includes the Pataki consultant Kieran Mahoney, netted $63,000 in fees. Mr. Pataki's fund-raising adviser, Cathy Blaney, collected $52,000 in fees, while the firm of political operative Arthur Finkelstein received $46,450 in the first half of 2004.

    Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company

  6. #996

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    January 22, 2005

    Design Deadline Is Postponed for Trade Center Theater Site

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP

    Acknowledging the complexity of shoehorning two troupes into four theaters on a one-acre site, the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation has postponed by several months the design deadline for a performing arts center at the new World Trade Center.

    When Gehry Partners was selected as the architect in October, preliminary designs were expected in mid-February. But the task of laying out - under one undulating roof - a new home for both the Joyce Theater International Dance Center and the Signature Theater Center proved very difficult in such short time.

    On Thursday, the corporation extended design development into summer or fall, as necessary. "We want to make sure we have the time to do the right program, since we're building for the decades," said Kevin M. Rampe, the corporation president.

    The most immediate engineering concern for the performing arts center is the underground space - mechanical rooms, elevator pits, loading docks, parking areas - which will be shared to some extent with the nearby Freedom Tower.

    Foundations for the performing arts center will be arranged to permit the greatest flexibility above ground, Mr. Rampe said.

    A preliminary design for the museum complex across Fulton Street, by the Norwegian firm Snohetta, may be ready in March. Work is moving more quickly on that project, Mr. Rampe said, in part because it is a fundamentally simpler structure.

    Linda Shelton, the executive director of the Joyce Theater Foundation, said yesterday that the trade center project had gained momentum and that the Joyce was "very confident" about the ability of its consultants to solve the three-dimensional puzzle.

    "That said," she continued, "the time line was very short for Feb. 15, so we do appreciate having a little more time." A spokesman for the Signature Theater Company echoed Ms. Shelton's sentiments.

    The site for the performing arts center is about 40,000 square feet, roughly half the area covered by the Metropolitan Opera House or four-fifths the area of Avery Fisher Hall.

    On that site, the architect Frank Gehry is to fit a 900-to-1,000-seat theater, where the Joyce can present dance works, and three auditoriums for Signature: one with 499 seats, one with 299 and one with 99 to 199. There will also be cafes, a gift shop, meeting rooms and rehearsal studios.



    Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company

  7. #997
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    Hmmm, Tower 2's base is much bigger than FT's, most I've seen they are much smaller.


    I guess the other towers wont really be very tall then huh? Kinda sad.

  8. #998
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    So heres how the final plan looks to play out.


    Freedom Tower: 1000 feet of offices
    Tower 2: 900 feet
    Tower 3: 800 feet
    Tower 4: 700 feet
    Tower 5: 600 feet


    thats what most sources point at.

    Thats very sad news indeed. :roll:

  9. #999
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    Hopefully I'm wrong. :?

  10. #1000

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    I hate to say this, but the continued speculation regarding height, floors, etc. is absurd. None of us will know anything new until such time that the news is announced to the public.

  11. #1001
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    Your right...Im just foolin around.


    The thing is we dont know if we know FT's. The 1150 foot, 70 floor tower may be the final or it may not.

  12. #1002
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    Quote Originally Posted by NY Times
    A preliminary design for the museum complex across Fulton Street, by the Norwegian firm Snohetta, may be ready in March.
    That's not too far off.
    That part of the plan has always been a big question mark. We've only seen Liebeskind's angular structures there so far. Looking forward to whatever they come up with, it may drastically alter the look of the site given its central location.


    Quote Originally Posted by PHLguy
    ...we don't know if we know...

    ...may be the final or it may not...
    I know the waiting isn't easy, but please, stop the absurd speculation, it's pointless.

  13. #1003

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    To correct your statement:

    So heres how the final plan looks to play out.


    Freedom Tower: 1000 feet of offices
    Tower 2: 900 feet
    Tower 3: 800 feet
    Tower 4: 700 feet
    Tower 5: 600 feet


    thats what most sources point at.

    Thats very sad news indeed.
    No sources point to that. Only the speculation at Skyscraper Page does. This is not to turn into another Skyscraper Page so keep all speculation there. Consider this your first warning.

  14. #1004

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    January 30, 2005

    Verizon Seeks Coordination of Downtown Street Work

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP

    erizon has warned public officials that telephone service downtown and the development timetable at the World Trade Center site may be in jeopardy unless government agencies better coordinate rebuilding efforts.

    "There is a significant risk that the restoration projects planned for Lower Manhattan may be delayed and that telecommunications services, including emergency E-911 services to Lower Manhattan, may be again disrupted," said Stephen Lefkowitz of Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson, lawyers for Verizon, at a hearing on Wednesday before the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation. (E-911 refers to the enhanced 911 system.)

    He said a coordinated approach to tearing up and replacing streets was needed. "This is a request that Verizon has made for several years that still does not seem to have been acted upon," Mr. Lefkowitz added.

    At stake, he said, was service to about 150 buildings from the Battery to the civic center. A map provided by Verizon of the 37-block area shows that it would include the Federal Reserve Bank, the American Stock Exchange, the Bank of New York headquarters, 1 Chase Manhattan Plaza, 1 Liberty Plaza and Trinity Church.

    One of the greatest difficulties, Mr. Lefkowitz said, was not knowing whether a bypass tunnel for through traffic would be built by the State Department of Transportation along West Street-Route 9A, nor where the tunnel would begin or end.

    It was the second time this week that an influential business interest took to the microphone at a public forum to urge better coordination of rebuilding efforts.

    On Monday, Jennifer Hensley, an assistant vice president of the Alliance for Downtown New York, called for the appointment of an executive director for the newly created Lower Manhattan Construction Command Center, which she said was "at risk of becoming obsolete before it is even operational."

    The appearances were striking because businesses typically try to settle problems with public agencies behind closed doors. And both Verizon and the Downtown Alliance have voices at the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation. Paul A. Crotty, Verizon's group president for New York and Connecticut, sits on the corporation board, as does Carl Weisbrod, president of the Downtown Alliance.

    Responding to the statements, Lynn Rasic, a spokeswoman for Gov. George E. Pataki, said in an e-mail message: "The governor has always considered it a priority to coordinate the public and private sector on all projects. We expect to name a Construction Command Center executive director in the very near future who will lead our coordination efforts and limit disruption for the Lower Manhattan community. In the meantime, coordination amongst the agencies is already taking place."

    As to West Street-Route 9A, Ms. Rasic said: "The governor directed D.O.T. to explore alternatives that will protect the sanctity of the memorial and satisfy the safety needs of the surrounding community. D.O.T. is currently evaluating these alternatives and completing the environmental review."

    John Bonomo, a spokesman for Verizon, said in an e-mail message that the company "in no way wishes to disrupt or impede" the trade center redevelopment.

    Verizon's public criticism was occasioned by a hearing on the state's plan to acquire, by condemnation, most of a small city block south of the trade center site, bounded by Liberty, West, Cedar and Washington Streets. The property is owned by the Milstein family; no one from the family testified at the hearing on Wednesday.

    The block would be used for the ramps leading from street level to the underground roadway system beneath the new trade center. Above the ramps would be a landscaped berm or hillock serving as the western half of a new park extending to Greenwich Street. A new foundation wall would be constructed south of Liberty Street.

    Verizon said that this plan would require it to move its Liberty Street network of cables and conduits. This would take two years and could not begin until a new underground route is approved, Verizon said. In turn, the trade center redevelopment south of Liberty Street could not be completed until Verizon's cables and conduits are moved.

    Complicating matters is that moving the Liberty Street network depends in part on the West Street-Route 9A project. Verizon estimated it would have to spend about $50 million, and even more if it must also move the network under Route 9A.

    The company asked that permanent - and inalterable - new routes be approved for its underground infrastructure and that it be reimbursed for the work.

    Verizon is simultaneously discussing with city officials a plan to move its headquarters from 1095 Avenue of the Americas, at 42nd Street, to 140 West Street, a landmark building across Vesey Street from the trade center site.

    D. Joy Faber, a spokeswoman for Consolidated Edison, which has also been rebuilding its underground network in Lower Manhattan, said, "To date, we do not have the same concerns" as those expressed by Verizon.

    Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company

  15. #1005

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    They've finally started to take down the last remaining part of the parking garage in the last day or two. Check out the web cam:
    http://www.earthcam.com/usa/newyork/...cam3_lg_01.php
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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