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Thread: Columbia University Campus Expansion - Manhattanville

  1. #151

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    Columbia is being asked to buy the community's approval.

    I say let's dispense with the niceties and cut to the nitty-gritty. Columbia should offer to pay $5000 cash to every resident and every full-time employee in the area in question upon their signing of a petition asking the city to hurry up and approve the project. The hundred million or so bucks thus spent would represent a bargain for Columbia and a much coveted windfall for the community.

    Win/win.

    Then everyone can have a victory parade and appoint Jordi Reyes-Montblanc as Drum Major.

  2. #152
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Columbia University's northward expansion plans presented





    13-JUL-07

    Columbia University gave a presentation of the environmental impact statement for its planned expansion north of 125th Street to the Manhattanville community last night at Lerner Hall on Broadway at 114th Street.

    Its expansion plans were recently certified into the city's Uniform Land Use Review process and earlier this week Community Board unanimously voted to endorse the board's 197-A plan that sets development standards for the West Harlem area and seeks to protect residents from primary and secondary displacement from new developments. The 197-A plan mandates that 50 percent of all new housing units be affordable for people who live in the community.

    The university, which is hoping to develop a major northward expansion of its Morningside Heights campus south of 125th Street and is seeking a change in zoning, announced yesterday it would not seek eminent domain to evict residents in the area into which it wants to expand.

    The university's "academic mixed-use development" would occupy about 17 acres in a 35-acre Special District and its development would total about 6.8 million gross square feet above and below grade primarily of "community facility uses serving the university, with street-level retail and other active ground-floor uses."

    The remaining 18 acres would include 9 acres between 12th Avenue and Marginal Street and east of Broadway, which are estimated to result in another 329,500 gross square feet of commercial and residential development, and 9 acres between marginal Street and the pier line of which two acres comprises the area of the new West Harlem Waterfront park and 7 acres comprises city-owned land under water that cannot be developed nor generate transferable air rights.

    Much of the area proposed to be rezoned is across Broadway from Manhattanville Houses.

    The university's proposal limits the floor-to-area ratio in the proposed district to 6, whereas it is now predominately zoned with maximum FARs of 1 to 2, and calls for widening of sidewalks and view corridors leading to the waterfront and seeks to "enliven and activate West 125th Street as the gateway to the West Harlem Waterfront park, now under construction."

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  3. #153

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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    "community facility uses serving the university"
    WTF is that??




    (Doublespeak?)

  4. #154
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    Arch Record Today, July 18th 2007.
    For comments visit:http://archrecord.construction.com/n...70618piano.asp
    Piano, SOM’s Columbia Plan Stirs Controversy

    June 18, 2007




    by Dorian Davis
    Renzo Piano is not bashful about his plan to raze century-old, masonry-clad factories and tenements in West Harlem and replace them with big, crisp buildings of steel and glass—a new campus for Columbia University that resembles Metropolis more than it does the existing neighborhood. “Cities are bound to change,” he says, “You have to accept it.”

    Images courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop / Skidmore Owings & Merrill
    Created by Renzo Piano and SOM, Columbia University’s new 17-acre campus will replace low-rise warehouses and tenements with glass-walled towers.







    Pressed for space at its original campus in Morningside Heights, 10 blocks south, Columbia hired Piano in 2003. He created a sprawling, city-within-a-city that covers 17 acres with 6.8 million square feet of box-shaped towers; Skidmore Owings & Merrill formulated the urban plan. But to make way for this development, Columbia must contend with three privately owned warehouses that refuse to sell, including one that was recently added to the National Register of Historic Places. Its plan to demolish them is raising the specter of eminent domain and pitting Columbia against Harlem residents.
    Piano says the results will be worth the controversy. Punctuated by tree-lined quads, his buildings are meant to bring a new, open sense to the neighborhood. Their ground floors will host retail stores and restaurants. “We put the dirty functions—garbage, ramps, parking, and loading—underground, because they make a very opaque environment, and we put the research facilities up higher, so that everything on the ground is more transparent and public,” he explains.
    Columbia’s plan took a big step forward this summer following the completion of an environmental impact statement and feasibility study by Thornton Tomasetti and AKRF. The city’s Planning Department is scheduled to start the land review process today, giving the local Community Board 60 days to review Columbia’s plans and suggest changes. If approved, construction would be completed in two phases: the first by 2015, the second by 2030. Meanwhile, the Community Board’s own plan, called 197A—which includes more preservation and avoids eminent domain—goes before public hearings in July.
    Developing a new campus almost as big as the original one requires extensive dialogue with neighborhood residents, Piano concedes. “Listening is a very tough job, because you have to listen to the right voices, and sometimes the right voices are very little voices.” But residents wonder if, so far, the architect has listened only to Columbia. His plan calls for retaining only a handful of existing buildings: three small, brick structures dating to the early 1900s. They include a terra cotta-faced building where the architect makes his local office. “We saved buildings that will give a sense of the history of this neighborhood. It’s a mix of the past but, at the same time, the courage to go ahead and change,” he says.
    Neighborhood residents and others contend that more preservation is warranted. “How can only three or four buildings preserve the character of a neighborhood,” says Eric Washington, author of Manhattanville, a history of the area. “That’s a lot of responsibility for four buildings.” Instead of demolishing some of the older structures, residents want Columbia to build its campus around them. “It has the opportunity to embrace such a rich community,” says Anne Whitman, owner of Hudson Moving and Storage, which could be seized if the state, prodded by Columbia, invokes eminent domain.
    For its part, the university contends that an influx of shopping, dining, working, and living opportunities will quiet dissent. “This is an area that is going to change, and should change in significant ways,” says Columbia University president Lee Bollinger. It’s a sentiment that Piano shares: “You can’t embalm a city,” he says.


    Photo: © Charles Linn
    The owners of a storage facility slated for demolition protest Columbia's plans"

  5. #155

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skylimitone View Post
    Columbia hired Piano in 2003. He created a sprawling, city-within-a-city that covers 17 acres
    It doesn't "sprawl", and Piano didn't "create" the project boundaries.

    This is an article in an architecture magazine? You'd think their reporters would know better (or at least the editors).

  6. #156

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    Still, I know that area well, and while it could surely stand for some sprucing up, IMHO a little architectural variety instead of top-to-bottom Renzo would really yield a far better result.

  7. #157

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    "But to make way for this development, Columbia must contend with three privately owned warehouses that refuse to sell, including one that was recently added to the National Register of Historic Places. Its plan to demolish them is raising the specter of eminent domain and pitting Columbia against Harlem residents."

    WHAT? Demolishing one that was recently added to the National Register of Historic Places? The NATIONAL Register of Historic Places? And they want to raise it?

    "Its plan to demolish them is raising the specter of eminent domain and pitting Columbia against Harlem residents."

    Like, is that a surprise or something?

    And I LOVE this one:

    "His plan calls for retaining only a handful of existing buildings: three small, brick structures dating to the early 1900s. They include a terra cotta-faced building where the architect makes his local office."

    Of course.

    The Pope, The Queen, Castro... they all get the best digs. Eminent domain indeed.

  8. #158

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    It's a joke that this area has resistence to new development. Does the historic signficance have to do with drug dealer turf? This is a pretty scary part of the city as it stands now, except for the fairway market.

    I hope for the best regarding Columbia's new Expansion plans.

  9. #159

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    "It's a joke that this area has resistence to new development."

    The joke is that you expect residents to sit around and not make a peep while developers demolish a neighborhood building that is on the National Register of Historic places. C'mon now... isn't that just a little naive?

    "Does the historic signficance have to do with drug dealer turf?"

    ^ would you mind explaining that one?

  10. #160

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    The joke is that you expect residents to sit around and not make a peep while developers demolish a neighborhood building that is on the National Register of Historic places. C'mon now... isn't that just a little naive?
    Any building listed on the National Register of Historic Places should be preserved automatically and with no discussion. Period.

    That said, I think it's naive to think the folks in the nabe care about this as anything but a handy tool for obstructionism.

  11. #161

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    Since the master plan won't be fully built out until 2030, it's unlikely that the buildings will be done by the same architects. If Columbia keeps the architectural bar high, this will be marvelous.

    SOM finally updated that cumbersome site of theirs and uploaded some nice pics of their New York projects, including this one. However, after glancing at their other, more exciting work in other cities, I can't help but feel NY is biting the dust. At least their projects here are corporately classy.

    http://www.som.com/content.cfm/colum...anville_campus
    Columbia University Manhattanville Campus Master Plan

    http://www.som.com/content.cfm/www_p...=NANE&pindex=1
    Eastern U.S. projects

  12. #162

  13. #163

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    Bland.
    I agree, nothing to get excited about...

  14. #164

    Arrow Smart Growth

    Quote Originally Posted by DominicanoNYC View Post
    I agree, nothing to get excited about...
    Here is something to get excited about: the restoration of an old building on the north section of the proposed Columbia University Campus has just been completed; I think this is going to be a resturant.

    I should have asked David Dinkins what the plans are for this newly renovated building, he was standing on the sidewalk at 125th street in front of the Columbia Science Building; I walked by him moments before I took these photos. He is currently a professor of public affairs at Columbia, so maybe he was teaching a class nearby - who knows.

    I have attached some photos of the newly renovated building and am looking forward to seeing more new developments in this area. This project has been a long time in the making; but I have heard recently that - if all goes well - final approvals for this project could be only few months away.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by infoshare; August 14th, 2007 at 07:02 PM.

  15. #165

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    I hope it is a restaurant

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