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Thread: WTC Transit Hub - by Santiago Calatrava

  1. #3166

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  2. #3167
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    Jigsaw puzzle?

  3. #3168

  4. #3169
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Can anybody calculate all the man hours needed for welding these big bits together?

    Plus each piece of wing has a number of steel projections, used when moving & stabilizing the piece as it goes into place; all those need to be cut away and smoothed off. Lots of hours there, too.

    No wonder the budget for this has ballooned.

  5. #3170

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    Can anybody calculate all the man hours needed for welding these big bits together?

    Plus each piece of wing has a number of steel projections, used when moving & stabilizing the piece as it goes into place; all those need to be cut away and smoothed off. Lots of hours there, too.

    No wonder the budget for this has ballooned.
    Sandy has surely inflated the overall costs of the project, but it is being covered by insurance companies. Project is now a ~4 billion one and will be surely delayed by at least 8 months from current completition schedule, as an optimist, say mid 2016.

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  7. #3172
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Great shots ^

    WTC Earth cam no longer shows the Oculus angle

    But the Tower 1 Base Cam gives a glimpse of the work going on:

    In this shot from today, showing workers tucked inside one of the ribs at left center, the size of this rising behemoth is apparent ...

    Click image for larger version. 

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  8. #3173

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    Looks like you already know, lofter, but here is the direct link for the Oculus camera: http://archives.earthcam.com/archive...gzmpr288_4.jpg

  9. #3174
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Great archived shot, but is there a live link to the active Oculus cam?

  10. #3175

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    That link updates every 15 minutes or so.

  11. #3176
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Thanks!

  12. #3177

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    click through for a panorama of the oculus' interior. very exciting.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/18/ny...t.html?hp&_r=0

    A Transit Hub in the Making May Prove to Be the Grandest

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP

    Published: July 17, 2013


    How much did it cost to build Grand Central Terminal?

    Most people cannot answer that question ($80 million, as it happens), in part because it no longer seems very salient. Whatever the price, New York received an enduring landmark in exchange, a portal to the city that has never lost its power to inspire awe.

    If the World Trade Center Transportation Hub is ever to emerge from under the shadow of its $3.94 billion price tag (double Grand Central’s, adjusted for inflation), it will have to do more than move PATH commuters efficiently. It will have to lift hearts.
    Perhaps it can.

    A visit to the monumental station on Wednesday left the impression that its main transit hall may be the most hopeful element at the trade center complex when it opens in 2015.

    Now full of light and air, it will one day be full of people, movement and life, as well. It could become a destination in its own right, even for those who are not among the 200,000 or so commuters traveling daily to and from New Jersey.

    The transportation hub and retail concourses will be “the only facilities on site that are completely accessible to the public,” said a report by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which is building the hub. By contrast, visitors to the office towers, the National September 11 Memorial Museum and the 1 World Trade Center observatory will be subject to tight scrutiny.

    In the end, that may be the most astonishing feature of the hub; that a structure of such colossal proportions should be devoted to unobstructed public use. The main transit hall is 365 feet long — a block and a half — making it 90 feet longer than the main concourse of Grand Central Terminal. It is 115 feet wide, or just 5 feet narrower than the Grand Central concourse. It takes a half minute to walk from one side to the other.

    The transit hall will soar 160 feet, from the floor to the apogee of its arched, ribbed steel-and-glass canopy. That is 35 feet higher than the ceiling at Grand Central.

    The architect of the hub, Santiago Calatrava of Spain, came to New Yorkers’ attention in 1992. He proposed completing the unfinished transept of the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine with bold, branching forms that conjured the work of Antonio Gaudí, the Catalan architect whose exuberant designs transformed Barcelona, Spain.

    For the PATH terminal, Mr. Calatrava has fashioned a sinuously organic space that looks more and more like a modernist version of Gaudí as it takes form.

    And like Gaudí’s Expiatory Temple of the Holy Family, the transportation hub has left a lot of people wondering when construction would ever be finished, and at what cost.

    When the original design was unveiled in 2004, the project was supposed to cost $2 billion and take five years to finish. The canopy was given two counterposed structural wings that reminded many viewers of a bird in flight, as Mr. Calatrava intended. The sides of the canopy were to be retractable, so the roof could open in fine weather.

    The underground mezzanine leading to the passenger platforms was to be a column-free expanse, naturally illuminated by skylights set into the memorial plaza above.

    In 2005, Mr. Calatrava’s ethereal bird put on weight, after the Port Authority insisted on reinforcing the canopy with twice as many ribs as originally planned. By 2006, it was clear that officials of the memorial foundation, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg among them, regarded Mr. Calatrava’s mezzanine skylights as an intrusion on their plaza.

    As the cost of material and labor rose, the Port Authority conceded in 2007 that the hub’sprice tag might reach $3.4 billion. The operable wings were eliminated as a cost-cutting measure, as was the plan for a column-free mezzanine. But added expenses and difficulties were imposed by the use of custom steel elements made by Urssa and Horta Coslada, Spanish fabricators with experience working on Mr. Calatrava’s projects.

    The authority said in its 2012 annual report that the hub may end up costing as much as $3.995 billion. This does not include the price of recovering from Hurricane Sandy.

    Surge waters during the storm reached knee level on the PATH passenger platforms, said Steven Plate, the director of World Trade Center construction at the Port Authority. The entire trade center site was flooded with about 125 million gallons of water. Newly installed emergency electrical equipment was damaged beyond repair. Tracks were washed out. Four or five new escalators were ruined. Ductwork had to be replaced.

    All told, an estimated $300 million to $400 million in damage was done to the hub. But this is not calculated as a construction expense, Mr. Plate said, because it is being covered by insurance and by federal grants.

    “The dollar amount was neutral,” Mr. Plate added, undoubtedly glad that he could.

  13. #3178

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    New York Post
    July 19, 2013

    ‘Hub’-bub: World Trade Center Transportation Hub is a sight to behold — but how functional is it?

    By STEVE CUOZZO

    The World Trade Center Transportation Hub — six years late and nearly $2 billion over budget — is finally starting to look like a “bird in flight.”

    Or is it a scary spaceship like the ones in the “Alien” movies?

    With the Santiago Calatrava-designed project’s “wings” finally sprouting from the ground, the Port Authority yesterday offered us a first look inside the belly of the beast — the $3.9 billion transit complex that will link the PATH station with 13 subway lines, the MTA’s new Fulton Center, WTC office buildings and stores, the World Financial Center and Winter Garden, and just maybe the New Jersey Palisades.

    For the first time, we stood inside the now roof-less Oculus, the subterranean transit hall big enough to swallow Grand Central Terminal with a 365-foot-long floor, an arched, 160-foot-high ceiling and framed by exterior “wings” rising to 250 feet.

    We ventured deeper underground into the PATH Hall — a second endless concourse New Jersey commuters must traverse to reach trains. If the Oculus suggests a whale’s stomach with its soaring steel ribs, the Hall’s snaking, pipe-like ceiling evokes the spacecraft where creatures from hell ate Sigourney Weaver’s mates alive.

    Two years before its rescheduled 2015 opening, the hub still has a long way to go before it looks anything like renderings we’ve all seen. Even now, though, it’s undeniably an astonishing — perhaps heroic — feat of architectural engineering.

    It’s impossible to stand in its midst and not be moved by the sheer magnitude of talent, energy and determination that have brought the Hub this far. No wonder it’s costing more than anything else at “Ground Zero,” more even than the soaring 1 WTC.

    But is this pet project of the PA’s New Jersey side worth it?

    The Hub’s so big, complicated and densely packed with everything all around, it made three skyscrapers and the Memorial much harder and costlier to build.

    And how many will use it? More than 250,000 daily, PA construction chief Steve Plate said yesterday. Skeptics say as few as 50,000, mostly Jersey commuters. The project adds no new track, only endless underground corridors for walking from here to there. Isn’t that what city streets are for?

    scuozzo@nypost.com

    © Copyright 2013 NYP Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. #3179
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Cuozzo is a sour puss.

    Plus, doesn't he know that NYPD doesn't want folks on those streets & sidewalks up above around the WTC?

  15. #3180
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    Oddly, they've actually taken that second piece on the left off.

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