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Thread: WTC Transit Hub - by Santiago Calatrava

  1. #3796

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    The platform width is based around the track usage, with more people going to Newark Penn than Hoboken. I would assume that the Hoboken platform was overwhelmed at first due to the advertising and the transit opportunities. Now there are four platforms, with two twice the size of the Hoboken platform and a side platform for emergency egress(it also shows the original footprint of the North Tower, which is a nice tribute). More than enough to offer commuters in a time of rush, however with only one incoming and outgoing tunnel I still believe that all the platforms won't be used to their potential. They were primarily used in the old terminals as holding tracks on weekends.

  2. #3797
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    Having been to the "Hub" several times now since it's opened, I have nothing but good things to say about the place. Very well done, and more awe inspiring than Grand Central and dare I say the original Penn Station. At least the 4 billion wasn't completely wasted!

  3. #3798

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    New York Times
    December 18, 2016

    A Vestige of the Original World Trade Center Returns to Duty

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP


    A new passageway connecting the Chambers Street subway station to the Oculus Transportation Hub in Lower Manhattan. It incorporates remnants of the original World Trade Center. Credit Pablo Enriquez for The New York Times

    On Monday, thousands of subway riders getting off trains at Chambers Street in Lower Manhattan will pull open metal-and-glass doors that have been closed for years and stream through a travertine-paved passageway.

    Most will be lost in rush-hour oblivion. Some will appreciate the restored shortcut to PATH trains. A few will gasp in recognition.

    That mottled, straw-colored travertine will tell them exactly where they are standing: within the last extant remnant of the original World Trade Center, a portion of the concourse that looks just as it did in the 1970s.

    Well, not exactly. One door, now encased in protective glass, has been spray-painted with orange markings. The notation “MATF 1” is scribbled on it. Below that, “9 13.” The graffiti let rescue and recovery workers know, after the 2001 terrorist attack, that the area had been searched on Sept. 13 by the Massachusetts Task Force 1 Urban Search and Rescue Team, based in Beverly, Mass., and working for the Federal Emergency Management Agency.


    A door from the original World Trade Center on view in the passageway. The markings let rescue and recovery workers know that the area had been searched on Sept. 13, 2001. Credit Pablo Enriquez for The New York Times

    It is an astonishing time capsule, linking the muscular, hard-edge New York subway with the voluptuous, snow-white world that the architect Santiago Calatrava conjured in the World Trade Center Transportation Hub.

    “Our theme is respecting and remembering the past, and including it in a sophisticated way,” said Steven Plate, the chief of major capital projects at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which restored the passageway as part of the $4 billion transportation hub and shopping mall.

    Under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the authority was required, as a condition of receiving federal financing for the hub, to salvage, preserve or document remnants and artifacts of the trade center. This includes what is called the “E Subway Entrance,” since the passageway leads to and from the Chambers Street terminus on the E line.

    The authority agreed to incorporate original elements of the passageway — travertine flooring, handrails, steps and ramp, doors and overhead signs — into the new transportation hub. Explanatory signs have been placed on the walls of the passageway and on the door with the “MATF 1” marking.

    At the moment, the passageway is not useful for disabled riders because it leads to a broad flight of 26 marble stairs down into the hub. Glenn P. Guzi, a program director at the authority, said an elevator will be installed next year.


    Part of the original foundation wall, also called the slurry wall, can be seen in the PATH terminal. Credit Pablo Enriquez for The New York Times

    The passageway will serve riders on the A, C, E, 2 and 3 lines. Before the 2001 attack, about 10,000 people went through it daily, Mr. Plate said.

    After the twin towers were destroyed on Sept. 11, 2001, the passageway was closed. It reopened for a few years as a temporary connection between the subway and PATH commuter rail systems, then was closed to permit construction of the hub. During that time, the travertine, handrails and doors were covered in protective plywood.

    Handsome directional signs inside the passageway are to be reinstalled. A less-than-handsome overhead sign outside the passageway (“PATH Trains to New Jersey”) will not be coming back.

    Neither will WTC Newsstand & Novelties, next to the passageway, which was owned and operated by the brothers Reajul Islam and Fakrul Alam-Onar. In September 2015, Mr. Islam said business had dropped to between $100 and $200 a day, from $2,000 to $3,000 a day when the passageway was in use. The few people who stopped by, he said, limited themselves to bottled water or candy bars.

    Mr. Islam said at the time that he needed the passageway to reopen “immediately” if business was to recover. More than a year elapsed. The newsstand straggled along. Then, at the end of November, the brothers surrendered their lease to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

    A spokesman for the agency said the newsstand would probably be demolished.

    2016 The New York Times Company

  4. #3799
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    good to know, I'll go check that out this week

  5. #3800

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    I can't help but roll my eyes at the sensationalists claiming that this connection has been closed since 9/11. I used to use it up until its actual closing in 2008...

    It's disappointing that they didn't attempt to restore the corridor to its pre-9/11 design; only the flooring, handrails, and two signs (from summer 2001) are intact. The rest of it looks cold, icy, and white, unlike the warm, dim, mellow interior of the original mall. Maybe they were trying to make it fit with the Oculus? Personally, so little of the original corridor remains that I'd prefer a full demolition so that the elevation would better suit the new mall. You have to walk up those steps to the original mall's elevation only to descend again down a staircase with more steps than would have otherwise been necessary. It's like a mound that you have to hurdle over before reaching the mall. I think preserving the bank of doors would have been sufficient, considering how much they modified the corridor from the days of the first temporary PATH hub.

    At the very least, could they please swap the 'preserved' door with that lonely door all the way to the west so that they don't obstruct foot traffic? That would just make a whole lot more sense.

  6. #3801
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enigmatism415 View Post
    I can't help but roll my eyes at the sensationalists claiming that this connection has been closed since 9/11. I used to use it up until its actual closing in 2008...

    It's disappointing that they didn't attempt to restore the corridor to its pre-9/11 design; only the flooring, handrails, and two signs (from summer 2001) are intact. The rest of it looks cold, icy, and white, unlike the warm, dim, mellow interior of the original mall. Maybe they were trying to make it fit with the Oculus? Personally, so little of the original corridor remains that I'd prefer a full demolition so that the elevation would better suit the new mall. You have to walk up those steps to the original mall's elevation only to descend again down a staircase with more steps than would have otherwise been necessary. It's like a mound that you have to hurdle over before reaching the mall. I think preserving the bank of doors would have been sufficient, considering how much they modified the corridor from the days of the first temporary PATH hub.

    At the very least, could they please swap the 'preserved' door with that lonely door all the way to the west so that they don't obstruct foot traffic? That would just make a whole lot more sense.
    This IMO is complaining just for the sake of complaining. The new place is fantastic in pretty much every way

  7. #3802
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    I agree. I suspect the "journey" will become easier when they finally open the R train entrance on the west side of Church St. This is a good step for those coming from NJ who can connect to the E, A, & C without being exposed to the winter weather above ground.

  8. #3803

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    New York Daily News
    February 11, 2017

    Woman dies after she falls off escalator inside World Trade Center Oculus while reaching to grab hat

    By DALE W. EISINGER and THOMAS TRACY

    A 29-year-old woman plunged to her death off an escalator inside the famed World Trade Center Oculus early Saturday while reaching to grab a hat her twin sister accidentally dropped, law enforcement sources said.

    The victim, identified by sources as Jenny Santos of Kearny, N.J., managed to grab the hat in midair but reached too far over the escalator railing as she arrived at the upper level on the Greenwich St. side of the transit hub about 5:30 a.m.

    She pitched over the side — hat still in hand — plummeting 34 feet onto the main concourse floor below, sources said.

    Paramedics rushed her to Bellevue Hospital but she could not be saved, officials said.

    The Saturday morning tragedy was the first death at the $3.9 billion Oculus since it opened in March — a decade later than expected.

    The striking white marble transit hub designed by architect Santiago Calatrava houses the New Jersey PATH terminal that was destroyed in the 9/11 attacks and links commuters to 11 subway lines.

    The winged structure, which resembles a bird, also has a shopping mall.

    In October, a woman went into labor and gave birth inside the Oculus. A pair of Port Authority police officers assisted in the delivery.

    Copyright 2017 NYDailyNews.com. All rights reserved.

  9. #3804
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    ouch

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