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Thread: WTC Transit Hub - by Santiago Calatrava

  1. #76

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    Looks like an airport terminal. Its alright....

  2. #77
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    Calatrava's design puts a lot of pressure on Libeskind's cultural buildings which will adjoin the memorial and be its "bridge" to the transit center. Crystalline shards may be compatible with this free-standing transit center as they too will be free-standing buildings on the opposite side of the street, but Libeskind's challenge will be creating something original that is yet organic and cohesive.

    May David Childs be equally challenged and inspired. I keep my fingers crossed in hope.

    A bit off subject: In the WTC development thread, David Dunlop's article states that the bases of all of the skyscrapers, primarily retail, would be completed by 2009. Are Foster, Nouvel, and Maki already working behind the scenes on their designs or are these bases merely expectant of future buildings? Stern, if the transit center eventually serves as a primary portal to the regional airports, perhaps the airline terminal analogy may not be far off base. I'm happy with this kinetic form. And after what we've seen before, we finally have a chicken from which to count our eggs.

  3. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp
    Quote Originally Posted by dbhstockton
    Is there anything good in the Powerpoint presentation? I can't look at it on my Mac.
    You can download a free Powerpoint viewer for Mac here.
    Thank you, Zippy. It works very well.

  4. #79
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    This is absolutely beautiful. Very distinct, graceful and should be a joy to be in. It's the first WTC-site design that I not only have nothing to complain about, but I think it's freakin' cool. Only wish the tower was designed with someone capable of such creative expression.

  5. #80

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    January 22, 2004

    Winglike Design Unveiled for W.T.C. Transit Hub

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP

    Where there was darkness on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, the architect Santiago Calatrava would bring a flood of light in the form of a winged railway station, draped in glass, suffused with natural illumination and, on occasion, open to the clear skies above.

    Mr. Calatrava's design for the permanent World Trade Center PATH terminal — a soaring sculptural steel-and-glass shell covering a cathedral-like concourse and a network of passageways that would knit commuter trains, ferry boats, 14 subway lines and an entire swath of Lower Manhattan — was unveiled today to quick acclaim.

    "When you see the model, `Wow' is the first word that's got to come to your mind," said Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, who joined in the unveiling with Gov. George E. Pataki and officials of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which will build the terminal. It may cost up to $2 billion and take five years to complete.

    In its aesthetic and logistical ambitions, the PATH terminal might rise to the ranks of the old Pennsylvania Station and Grand Central Terminal, which Mr. Calatrava claimed as the "deepest inspirational object" in his new design.

    Like the original Pennsylvania Station, it will bathe travelers in daylight, which would reach all the way to the train platforms 60 feet below ground through the use of glass-block floors above. And like Grand Central, it would serve as the hub of an underground network linking numerous subway stations and skyscrapers.

    But it would also do something neither of these buildings did: move.

    Two counterpoised canopies over the main concourse, rising some 150 feet like skeletal birds' wings, could be opened hydraulically in about two minutes to create a tapered opening almost 50 feet wide at its center. This could be used to ventilate smoke out of the building in case of fire and to provide natural air-conditioning.

    "On a beautiful summer day," Mr. Calatrava said, "the building can work not as a greenhouse but as an open space." He also envisioned the symbolic power of opening the roof every year on the morning of Sept. 11, "giving us the sense of unprotection."

    "The building itself expresses the memory of Sept. 11," said Mr. Calatrava, 52, a Spanish architect, engineer and artist, who is widely admired for the lyrical quality of his bridges and train stations. Though he has a home on the Upper East Side, the PATH terminal would be Mr. Calatrava's first structure in New York City. (His partners in the design and engineering team are DMJM & Harris and the STV Group.)

    The main axis of the 360-foot-long concourse would align with the angle of the sun at 10:28 on the morning of Sept. 11, when the second tower of the World Trade Center collapsed into itself. The angle of the canopies' outer edges would mark the line of the sun at 8:46 that morning, when the first jetliner hit the towers.

    "I have to say that Santiago Calatrava's interpretation of the Wedge of Light is a brilliant one," Daniel Libeskind, the master planner working for the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, said today. "It's an inspiring one because it takes the master plan and contributes even a greater significance to the spaces that an architect of his caliber can do."

    Although the PATH terminal is the third major element of the trade center redevelopment project — in many ways, quite literally its heart — the design almost burst on the civic consciousness, since work has proceeded quietly, with none of the discordant prelude that accompanied Freedom Tower and the memorial, "Reflecting Absence."

    "This is the Port Authority's gift to New York City," Mr. Calatrava said today. "It will be a lamp of hope in the middle of Lower Manhattan, creating an unbroken line of natural light from the platforms to the sky."

    The Port Authority embraced the idea of creating a generous space. Indeed, the project may be criticized for extravagance, since there is a functioning $323 million temporary PATH station.

    The bold, sweeping curves of the PATH terminal canopies bring to mind several of Mr. Calatrava's recent projects, like the Milwaukee Art Museum expansion and the opera house at Santa Cruz de Tenerife in the Canary Islands. But they might also remind some viewers of Jorn Utzon's Sydney Opera House or Eero Saarinen's T.W.A. Flight Center at Kennedy International Airport or the glass wall planned by David M. Childs of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill as part of the proposed expansion of Pennsylvania Station.

    Mr. Calatrava has made it plain since last fall that he views the terminal as far more than a commuter rail station. "It is like the heart to the body," he said in an interview on Wednesday, "pulsing people in and out."

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  6. #81
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    It's gorgeous. The renderings are still a bit computery, but I'm betting that it will be a great terminal.

  7. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by DougGold
    This is absolutely beautiful. Very distinct, graceful and should be a joy to be in. It's the first WTC-site design that I not only have nothing to complain about, but I think it's freakin' cool. Only wish the tower was designed with someone capable of such creative expression.
    I agree...

  8. #83

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    Going back to someones comment about what Libeskinds cultural buildings will look like. I wouldnt get your hopes to high. His buildings are the worst kind of deconstructionism Ive seen. One such building hes done in London is nasty looking. In addition his many Haulocaust museums are at the very best weird. He should surrender control of these cultural buildings to Calatrava or someone else.

  9. #84

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    January 23, 2004

    From Underground, the PATH Station Becomes a Procession of Flight

    By HERBERT MUSCHAMP

    An exorcism was held yesterday at the World Financial Center Winter Garden at Battery Park City. The spirit of diminished expectations that produced the Winter Garden and buildings like it was severed from the soul of New York. In place of suburban shopping-mall atrium design, there emerged civic architecture of the highest order.

    Santiago Calatrava's design for the World Trade Center PATH station should satisfy those who believe that buildings planned for ground zero must aspire to a spiritual dimension. Over the years, many people have discerned a metaphysical element in Mr. Calatrava's work. I hope New Yorkers will detect its presence, too. With deep appreciation, I congratulate the Port Authority for commissioning Mr. Calatrava, the great Spanish architect and engineer, to design a building with the power to shape the future of New York. It is a pleasure to report, for once, that public officials are not overstating the case when they describe a design as breathtaking.

    Mr. Calatrava has the creative magnetism that the Spanish know as duende. The envious call this quality star power. I call it soul. Derived from duen de casa (lord of the house), duende descends on great poets, musicians, and dancers at peak moments of inspiration. It has alighted on Mr. Calatrava once again. The PATH station will be more than a building. It will cast out the defeatist attitude that has clogged New York's architectural arteries since the destruction of the old Pennsylvania Station.

    The PATH station has been designed in collaboration with the Downtown Design Partnership, a joint venture between two local firms, DMJM & Harris and the STV Group. It is aligned on an east-west axis, occupying a portion of the site designated as the Wedge of Light in Daniel Libeskind's ground zero plan. In place of a wedge (in reality, an inglorious traffic intersection), there will arise what Mr. Calatrava envisions as a bird, most likely a dove, released from the hands of a child. No more second-hand Statues of Liberty here, in other words. Rather, a prayer for peace.

    The outspread wings of this elusive bird are the design's most dramatic feature. Composed of steel and glass, the wings form two gigantic canopies that will shelter an open plaza surrounding the station. Some may see the shadow of an angel in this architectural image: a descendant of those great winged sculptures that descended on the skylines of great European cities in the mid-19th century. Bethesda Fountain in Central Park is their worthy American cousin. Mr. Calatrava has revived the genre in the form of an entire building.

    The bird's torso reminds this viewer of Eero Saarinen's magnificent ice hockey rink at Yale. Like other Saarinen projects, such as the former T.W.A. terminal at Kennedy Airport, the rink was criticized for making a showy display of structure that lacked structural justification. This criticism has been aimed at Mr. Calatrava, also. Though trained in engineering as well as architecture, Mr. Calatrava is a highly expressive, not to say an expressionistic, architect. Yet he differs from Saarinen in one crucial respect. His expressive gestures do not rely on concealed structural support; they have the integrity of their own physical being.

    Mr. Calatrava needs no hints from the solar system to make architecture out of light. He has been doing it for years. The genius of his design unfolds underground, where light from the roof cascades down three levels from the street to the train platforms. The intermediary levels mezzanine and concourse are sleek, dynamic spaces, open to the sky. At night, lighting from within the building will illuminate the plaza and the office towers surrounding it.

    It is easy to mistake Mr. Calatrava as an architect of sweetness and light. Risk and mortality are seldom absent from his designs. In the time capsule he designed four years ago for The New York Times Magazine, for example, a steel thorn appears to project forward from a pair of full-bodied lips. Like Henry Moore, Mr. Calatrava is often inspired by the skeletal remains of living forms. This formal source acquires greater depth of meaning at ground zero. The spreading canopies portend the afterlife.

    "The duende will not approach if he does not see the possibility of death," wrote Garcνa Lorca, the poet who introduced the creative imp to many non-Hispanic readers. Mr. Calatrava's reading of the concept is lighter. He once compared it to whiff of orange blossoms on the hills around Valencia. But in both cases the image derives from the land.

    This is the gentle paradox of Mr. Calatrava's transportation designs. They bring a sense of rootedness to the experience of movement. This quality may derive from Mr. Calatrava's affinity for Gothic religious architecture. The great cathedrals, too, are epic processionals, walks through lightness of structure, enclosure, and space.

    It helps to visualize the station's design in conjunction with "Reflecting Absence," the memorial designed by Michael Arad and Peter Walker. Both projects emphasize procession into the ground. The memorial procession will be darker. In the station, circulation will be radiant. The penetration of depth will be common to both.

    Mr. Calatrava is a poet of movement. Bridges and rail stations are among his finest lyrics. They connect the traveler not only to points in space, but also to the cosmopolitan idea. It has been a long time since New York has forged this strong a link to the rest of the world. It is poetry in the ancient sense of connective tissue: the beliefs and aspirations that hold a society together.

    In Europe, the winged statue was a totem of an earlier cosmopolitan age, an era when the continent was linked by trains. Infrastructure gave us modern cosmopolitanism, that is to say. May the art of making connections help bring peace.

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  10. #85

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    Updated:

    January 23, 2004

    A PATH Station That Honors 9/11, and Opens Wide, Too

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP

    Where there was darkness on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, the architect Santiago Calatrava would bring a flood of light in the form of a winged railway station, draped in glass, suffused with natural illumination and, on occasion, open to the clear skies above.

    Mr. Calatrava's design for the permanent World Trade Center PATH terminal, which was unveiled yesterday, is a soaring, sculptural, steel-and-glass shell covering a cathedral-like concourse. Through a network of passageways, the terminal would connect the Port Authority Trans-Hudson underground rail line from New Jersey and 14 subway lines.

    " 'Wow' is the first word that's just got to come to your mind," said Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg. He joined in the unveiling with Gov. George E. Pataki and officials of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which will build the terminal. It may cost up to $2 billion. Construction is expected to begin early next year and take four years to complete.

    Rather than rely on words alone, Mr. Calatrava took pastels to paper in the Winter Garden of the World Financial Center at Battery Park City. He sketched a child releasing a bird into the air, then superimposed the bird on the outline of the terminal.

    About 67,000 commuters boarded PATH trains at the trade center before the attack. Today, a temporary open-air station is used daily by about 30,000 travelers.

    In aesthetics and logistics, Mr. Calatrava's design aspires to be far more than a commuter rail station, vital as that is to Lower Manhattan. Its admirers are already mentioning it in the same breath as the old Pennsylvania Station, which was torn down in the early 1960's, and Grand Central Terminal, which Mr. Calatrava claimed as his "deepest inspirational object."

    Like the original Penn Station, the PATH terminal would bathe travelers in daylight, which would reach all the way to the train platforms 60 feet below ground through the use of glass-block floors above. And like Grand Central, it would be a hub of an underground network linking numerous skyscrapers and subway stations.It would also do something neither of the earlier stations did: move.

    Two counterpoised canopies over the main concourse, rising some 150 feet like skeletal birds' wings, could be retracted hydraulically in about two minutes to create a tapered opening almost 50 feet wide at its center. This would ventilate smoke from the building in case of fire and provide natural air-conditioning.

    "On a beautiful summer day," Mr. Calatrava said, "the building can work not as a greenhouse but as an open space." He also envisioned the symbolic power of opening the roof every year on the morning of Sept. 11, "giving us the sense of unprotection."

    "The building itself expresses the memory of Sept. 11," said Mr. Calatrava, 52, a Spanish architect, engineer and artist who is widely admired for the lyrical quality of his bridges and train stations. Though he has a home on the Upper East Side, the PATH terminal would be Mr. Calatrava's first structure in New York City. (His partners in the design and engineering are DMJM & Harris and the STV Group.)

    The angle of the canopies' outer edges would mark the line of the sun at 8:46 on the morning of Sept. 11, when the first plane struck the trade center. The main axis of the 360-foot-long concourse would be aligned with the angle of the sun at 10:28 that morning, when the second tower collapsed.

    An architectural expression of these angles was called for in the master site plan by Studio Daniel Libeskind. They formed the Wedge of Light plaza on either side of Fulton Street. In the Libeskind plan, the PATH terminal was to be south of the plaza, in the approximate location of Dey Street, adjoining one of the planned office buildings.

    Mr. Calatrava pulled the terminal northward, making it a free-standing structure surrounded by plazas, thereby reopening Dey Street. Because the terminal integrally expresses the Wedge of Light, its design won a warm endorsement from Mr. Libeskind, who has otherwise been struggling to preserve key elements of his year-old site plan.

    It was also embraced by Nikki Stern, whose husband, James E. Potorti, died in the north tower. After calling up the images of the design to the screen of her computer, she said her first reaction was - indeed - "Wow."

    "My second reaction was how beautifully it complements Daniel's plan," Ms. Stern said, "and how pleased I am that the Port Authority allowed Calatrava to create something that is respectful, yet so hopeful and functional."

    That is not to say that the difficult issues are all resolved. Among them is the extent to which the platforms and tracks of the new terminal will encroach on the footprints of the north and south towers.

    The amount of retail space in the 200,000-square-foot terminal will not only affect its character but could potentially drain life from the surrounding streets.

    Construction will also have to be coordinated with that of the memorial, the Fulton Street Transit Center being designed by Nicholas Grimshaw and with the office buildings planned by Silverstein Properties, including 62- and 65-story towers on either side of the terminal.

    Only two months ago, the $323 million temporary PATH station opened. A month later, the design of the 1,776-foot Freedom Tower was announced. And last week, the design of the memorial, "Reflecting Absence," was made public.

    The permanent PATH terminal and its surrounding network of passageways carries the largest price tag of any of these projects: up to $2 billion, financed with $1.7 billion from the Federal Transit Administration and $300 million in insurance proceeds.

    Governor Pataki seemed to anticipate criticism of the project as an extravagance when he summoned the memory of Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan. "He would lament the fact that we don't build grand things any more," Mr. Pataki said. The governor said he vowed that on the trade center site, "the buildings themselves would be a lasting tribute to those we lost and to the courage that showed on Sept. 11."

    After the unveiling, Robert B. Tierney, the chairman of the city Landmarks Preservation Commission, asked, "Should we pre-emptively landmark this?"

    The terminal will not in fact be eligible until it turns 30 years old. But glancing at the shimmering models nearby, Mr. Tierney said, "This will still be flying at that age."

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

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  12. #87

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    How would the Wedge of Light or the WTC hub axis work consistently with the sunlight each Sept. 11 considering leap year and such (or am I just missing something)?

  13. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedFerrari360f1
    Am I the only one who is a little disapointed? The size and scope of this project is minimal compared to other projects he has done. It looks a bit liek a upturend hairclip. Im not totaly disapointed as this is much better than the FT but I was expecting great things from Signor Calatrava. Can someone explain to me this concept of glassy trans-lucent tiles. From the description they sound slippery.
    I'm not disappointed at all. I think we are seeing a brilliant piece of architecture develop that will challenge and free forthcoming designers at the WTC to step up and be creative. I think the relative "small" footprint of the building reflects the fact that the tracks are not laid out parallel to one another as in a trainshed, but are instead stacked in layers below grade. Either way, and anybody can correct me if I am interpreting it wrong, it does seem that this is a huge station perhaps a block in length.

  14. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    Either way, and anybody can correct me if I am interpreting it wrong, it does seem that this is a huge station perhaps a block in length.
    For some reason it struck me at first as looking rather small, but yes, it looks to be about that size.

  15. #90

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    NY POST...

    WTC HUB: A WINNER

    By STEVE CUOZZO


    January 23, 2004 -- SAY this for Santiago Calatrava's design for the new World Trade Center Transporta tion Hub unveiled yesterday: It does nothing to clear up my confusion over what the "Wedge of Light" is supposed to be.

    The closest I can come to making sense of Daniel Libeskind's bone-headed brainstorm is this line from the Port Authority's description of the Calatrava scheme: "Greater open space in the Wedge of Light Plaza."

    Which seems to translate as: a smaller Wedge of Light Plaza."

    It's hard to say for sure, for — astonishingly — neither the PA nor the Lower Manhattan Development Corp. has an up-to-date map incorporating all the new Ground Zero elements.

    The PA graphic shown yesterday still displays the memorial quadrant as Libeskind drew it, with a building cantilevered over the north tower footprint — a building eliminated in the "Reflecting Absence" scheme announced a week ago.

    But if, as it appears, Calatrava's plan effectively reduces the amount of space wasted on the plaza, it's a good thing — just as every successive incremental erosion of Libeskind's master plan for Ground Zero is a good thing.

    The Calatrava design is full of good things, even though he was forced to orient it along the path of sunlight that's supposed to fall every Sept. 11 at 10:28 a.m. — a token accommodation to Gov. Pataki's infatuation with Libeskind's vision. (Besides the embarrassing disclosure that nearby buildings will block the sunlight Libeskind claimed would fall on every 9/11 anniversary, has it ever occurred to anyone that there's no guarantee of sunshine on any day?)

    But more than merely nibbling away at Libeskind's straitjacket, Calatrava's design succeeds on its own terms.

    Running more or less east-west between Church Street and an extended Greenwich Street, it looks nothing like anything in New York, but it sure looks a lot like his train stations in Liege, Belgium; Valencia, Spain; and Zurich, Switzerland. Calatrava, known for his glass-and-steel structures that seem to swoop and soar, has not switched tracks for Manhattan.

    It's just what we may have expected of him, tailored to the needs, conditions and emotional resonance of the site.

    Architectural purists will quibble over its "formal" elements and the extent to which it echoes his earlier work. But 150-foot-high "wings," meant to evoke a bird released into the air by a child, embody the same optimistic and resilient esthetic as David Childs' Freedom Tower behind the station.

    On paper at least, the design reveals a lyrical buoyancy rare in so functional a structure.

    Its key features — a vaulted grand pavillion with cathedral-like ribbed arches, and a transparent roof that will bring natural light to underground train platforms and occasionally open to the sky — seem too good to be true in a city that still hasn't been able to get the forever-promised "new" Penn Station off the ground.

    Indeed, it is the original Penn Station, demolished in the early 1960s, that all of Calatrava's work recalls — even though it bears it no literal resemblance. Penn Station's concourse, with its cathedral-like, vaulted and ribbed glass ceiling, remains the greatest room ever for many of us lucky enough to remember it.

    As a work of architecture, the Hub will draw legions of tourists and visitors Downtown — an antidote to the "Reflecting Absence" memorial's obsessive morbidity. And if a plan is realized for the new station to link up underground with subway lines on the east side of Broadway, it will be good news for everyone.

    Give the PA credit: The agency that often seems accountable to no one, which gave us the bad old World Trade Center and an airport train few want to use, this time did the right thing.


    *****************************

    DAILY NEWS...

    Beautiful monument, waste of money

    The Pharaoh Cheops, builder of the great Great Pyramid of Giza, would stand in awe of the cathedral-like train station that the Port Authority plans to construct as an anchor of the World Trade Center redevelopment.

    The station - a "transportation hub," in hyped development-speak - would be stunning. Designed by world-renowned architect Santiago Calatrava, it would take up a city block and soar to a winged glass roof resembling a vaulted cathedral. It's lovely, and almost as useless as the burial monument Cheops planted for himself in the desert.

    This is architecture for architecture's sake, and a wasteful use of the money the federal government sent to New York after 9/11. A pleasant, serviceable depot connecting PATH trains and downtown's subway spaghetti would do just fine, and cost a lot less.

    The Port Authority has an edifice complex. It's programmed to build monuments, whether or not they make economic sense. In this case, thanks mostly to the feds, the agency has $2 billion burning a hole in its pocket and is determined to spend as lavishly as possible.

    Project supporters include Gov. Pataki, a man for whom rebuilding at the Trade Center has become a mission and a path to a legacy. They say the station, with its five underground layers and glass roof that opens, will return New York to building grandly. They also say a transit hub is economically the best use of the federal dollars.

    As evidence, supporters cite a consultant's study. It asserts that having a hub would produce more economic development than, say, using the money to extend the Long Island Rail Road from Brooklyn to Manhattan. While the numbers thrown about in such studies are inherently squishy, let's grant that they're accurate. They only strengthen the argument against the project.

    Mass transit's sole function is to get people where they want to go as quickly and conveniently as possible. That's what generates economic development, not architecture that aspires to be the Eighth Wonder of the World. A less expensive station would get the job done with money left over to invest in transportation projects that generate even more for the economy.

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