Page 2 of 17 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 246

Thread: Renovation of the UN - by Fumihiko Maki with S.O.M.

  1. #16

    Default


  2. #17

    Default

    What no renderings?

    Its nice to see a community group so supporting, hopefully they wont mind a 1,100 foot tower in their backyard.

  3. #18
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    West Harlem
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    Is that what you've heard now?

  4. #19

    Default

    Designs to keep the enemies at the gate

    By Ted Smalley Bowen

    Published: February 19 2004 19:00 | Last Updated: February 19 2004 19:00

    Whatever it has done for global peace and equality, the United Nations is an undoubted architectural trendsetter. Its International Style 1950s headquarters in Manhattan, with its sleek monolithic exteriors and soaring, open interiors helped establish a US beachhead for postwar modernism. Now plans for extensive renovations and the addition of a new administrative building, to be designed by Fumihiko Maki, have once again put the UN at the forefront of design - this time the struggle to reconcile security features with aesthetics and openness.

    "We do not want to turn this place into a fortress. The UN belongs to the member states and it has to be the people's institution. The design concept should be in harmony with the existing complex," says Toshiyuki Niwa, executive director of the UN's capital master plan, which is overseeing the project. "However, our experience in Baghdad has had a strong effect on us. You have to think about all kinds of implications."

    The architectural manifestations of post-9/11 angst can be ugly. The design constraints, building materials and technologies intended to bolster security threaten to mar existing buildings and produce a generation of mean and uninspiring structures - lacklustre boxes with windowless façades hunkering behind guardhouses and thickets of bollards, those stubby car-stopping posts mushrooming on city sidewalks.

    A walk around Boston, which will host this summer's high-security Democratic national convention in its new conference centre, illustrates the problem. The historic Massachusetts State House is trapped behind an evolutionary assortment of perimeter defences - jersey barriers (slabs of concrete bolted together), metal pedestrian barriers and bollards obscured by ornamental metal cages. A thick black chain snakes around the main gate. Signs apologise for the inconvenience.

    On Boston harbour, the 1998 Joseph Moakley Federal Court House - built after the 1983 bombing of the US Marine barracks in Beirut and the 1995 bombing of the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma first prompted a rethink on the security of military and government facilities - greets pedestrians with brick walls, barred windows and bollards. The building's "open" feature, a sloping glass wall, faces the water.

    Concerns for building security are as old as architecture. But, while the crenellations, portcullises and lancet windows of medieval castles were both security features and pleasing to the eye, it is hard to imagine jersey barriers, metal detectors and blast-resistant curtain walls morphing into their aesthetic equivalent.

    Castle-builders were concerned with aesthetics as well as defence, according to Mark M. Jarzombek, professor of architectural history at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This is, in part, why their style survived military obsolescence. Palaces that served no defensive purpose continued to incorporate crenellations and the like for symbolic and aesthetic reasons.

    Security was not a specialised aspect of building, says Jarzombek. Until the end of the renaissance, architects' engineering skills were suited to both military and building demands. But by the 17th century, military architecture became its own, less aesthetic discipline. The present situation "is a return to the realisation that architecture is vulnerable," he says. "It puts military planning back into the design."

    Warren John Mathison, managing principal with Moshe Safdie and Associates in Somerville, Massachusetts, which has designed federal courthouses and Ben Gurion airport in Israel, says: "One approach is to lock it all up and put barriers around everything, and it appears as 'I'm scared and I'm gonna hide behind my wall here'. Another is 'all right, I'm going to make sure that everybody's aware that they're being watched and there's the need to identify yourself, but do it so that it doesn't visually disrupt the approach to a building'."

    However, that can be difficult to achieve. "Some of the devices that are necessary - magnometers and the X-ray machines for checking luggage - are visually disruptive," he says. The problem is that most customers do not care about the aesthetics, so manufacturers have not had to develop more visually pleasing products. "So we have to deal with it in our own way, by enclosing it in something or placing it in a building in a manner that's aesthetically acceptable."

    However, not everyone thinks security features should be hidden. It may be deemed necessary to leave them visible for tactical reasons. Some architects argue that there is also an aesthetic justification for that approach. "If it's really going to interfere with the architecture, [present it] as an intrusion that appears reversible," says David Fixler, a principal at Einhorn Yaffee Prescott in Boston and president of the New England chapter of Docomomo, the international group dedicated to preserving modernist buildings.

    And there is yet another dilemma - allowing access by emergency services. "Everything you do to keep a terrorist out will also act to keep emergency people out of the building, unless you provide a means to override those security features, and that's not too likely," says Donald Dusenberry of Simpson Gumpertz & Heger engineering in Boston. "Fixed bollards keep out fire-trucks, blast resistance in glass probably won't allow windows to open or be broken out."

    There are further difficulties with the retrofit of modern buildings such as the UN complex. This includes the Secretariat building (sporting New York City's first glass curtain walls), the domed General Assembly, a library and a conference building cantilevered over FDR Drive, and was the work of the International Committee of Architects, with names such as LeCorbusier and Oscar Niemeyer. "The buildings are subtle and human - marvellous modern architecture," says UN staff architect and project manager Katherine Grenier. "The preservation of modern buildings is tricky. Their feel and atmosphere comes from very subtle proportions, refined and clean and simple design. There are no cherubs to hide a new diffuser behind."

    Designers and engineers, faced with a balancing act between all these conflicting demands, say the onus must finally be with the building's owner realistically to assess the risks of attack and avoid expediency and overreaction - the enemies of pleasing and effective design.

    "You can try to make buildings stronger and more secure, but it may be that not many people wish to look at these structures," says Eduardo Kausel, professor of civil and environmental engineering at MIT. "Terrorist attacks are extremely rare. It makes no economic sense to design all structures to withstand them."

    www.ft.com

  5. #20

    Default

    Fumihiko Maki

    Maki's competition entry for the new European Central Bank premises:



    www.new-ecb-premises.com

  6. #21

    Default

    20/05/2004

    Press Release

    Fifth Committee Hears Progress Report on Capital Master Plan To Modernize UN Headquarters in New York

    Construction of New Building Could Begin in Late 2005

    The Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) this morning was presented with a progress report on the Capital Master Plan for the refurbishment and modernization of the United Nations Headquarters in New York.

    The plan was approved by the Assembly in December 2002, when, by the terms of its resolution 57/292, it expressed concern over the hazards and deficiencies of the current United Nations buildings and endorsed modernization of the existing complex and construction and lease purchase of a new United Nations building south of 42nd Street.

    Briefing the Committee, Under-Secretary-General for Management, Catherine Bertini, said that subject to resolution of various legislative and security approvals, the United Nations Development Corporation (UNDC) hoped to begin construction of a new building on the corner of First Avenue and 42nd Street late in 2005. The Secretariat was trying to accelerate that date, if possible. [The UNDC is a not-for-profit public benefit body created by the New York State legislature in 1968, with the support of New York City, to provide space and facilities for the United Nations community in New York.]

    The Capital Master Plan in all its aspects would be considered during the fifty-ninth session, when she hoped to present to the Assembly a number of options for the financing of the project, she said. Key decisions later this year would be critical to timely implementation of the Plan.

    The Secretariat continued to talk with the host Government and members of Congress regarding an interest-free loan from the United States, which still required congressional approval. [On 16 March, the United States representative submitted to the Fifth Committee his country’s provisional proposal for a $1.2 billion loan at 5.54 per cent interest for a maximum period of 30 years.] Meanwhile, the Organization was also looking at several other funding options, which included a 25-year or shorter repayment period to the host Government, which would lower the total cost.

    Also under consideration were nine additional scenarios -– all within the parameters of the current host country’s proposal -- involving various disbursement rates, grace and time periods. All those options could be adopted in response to a formal United States offer. Other possibilities related to the use of the United States offer as a guarantee against borrowing money from the private sector and giving Member States such opportunities as payment of their total assessment up front, thus avoiding any interest.

    Turning to funding, she said that each of the three components of the Capital Master Plan would be funded differently. The refurbishment of the United Nations complex was the responsibility of the Member States and would be handled by assessments. The Secretariat also hoped to offer Member States the opportunity to fund the refurbishment of specific conference rooms. The new building (DC-5) would be financed separately through the sale of bonds by the United Nations Development Corporation. That would not require any other cost to Member States. The rent that the United Nations would pay to the UNDC for building during the Plan was included in the $1.2 billion Plan cost. The major focus for the new Visitors’ Centre would be on the private-sector financing through various United Nations Associations.

    Now that there was a better sense of possible options, she would soon be recommending to the Secretary-General the appointment of an Advisory Board for the Capital Master Plan, she continued. Many of the issues would be “coming together” by late summer, and she expected to propose a range of funding modalities to the Assembly in the fall. By that time, she also hoped to have more solid negotiations, if not decisions, from the City and State of New York on the prospects of using the space on the corner of First Avenue and 42 Street for the new building and from the United States Congress about the pending proposal requested by the United Nations Development Corporation for the bond financing scheme for that facility. The UNDC had signed a contract with a renowned architect, Fumihiko Maki, for the design of the new building, supported by a New York firm, Fox and Fowle. It had also initiated a security assessment of the new building.

    Reports had also been prepared on the proposed new mid-sized meeting rooms and additional parking capacity. Those documents would be considered during the fifty-ninth session.

    Following the presentation, representatives of Ireland (on behalf of the European Union), United States, Canada, Japan, United Republic of Tanzania and Nigeria took the floor, welcoming the information provided and asking questions on the details of the project.

    Responding to questions from the floor, Ms. Bertini reiterated that on the issue of DC-5, the proposal was to finance the building by the sale of bonds. To begin that process, a legal commitment from the Assembly was needed that the Organization would pay rent for the building. The corner of 42nd Street and First Avenue was officially designated as park space. New York City and State had to pass legislation to take it off the rolls as park. That was one reason why the initial plans contained a proposal for an esplanade as a trade-off for the public for the lack of that space.

    She also clarified that discussions with community groups continued on the matter. However, the Councilwoman for the neighbourhood supported the Plan, and the Mayor was very excited about the project. Alternative space had not been explored, as it was unlikely that the legislature would not pass.

    John Clarkson, Officer-in-Charge of the Capital Master Plan, responded to a question on the lease purchase. He said the agreement between the United Nations and the Development Corporation was that the Organization would lease the space for 30 years, at which time it would have the option to buy the building for a nominal fee of $1 dollar. If it paid the bonds off early, it could own the building before the 30 years.

    http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2004/gaab3618.doc.htm

  7. #22

  8. #23
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    West Harlem
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo's entry: www.krjda.com > projects > current work

  9. #24

    Default

    In every sense of the word, not a winner.

  10. #25

    Default

    POLS GIVE HUSH-HUSH OK FOR U.N. EXPANSION

    By KENNETH LOVETT Post Correspondent

    November 18, 2004 -- ALBANY — State lawmakers have quietly agreed on a bill that would allow the United Nations to begin planning a controversial major renovation and expansion of its Manhattan headquarters, The Post has learned.
    The legislation, which the state Senate is set to approve today, grants the United Nations Development Corp. permission to undertake the required environmental and land-use review processes for the project, which has drawn local opposition.

    The bill also temporarily incorporates a nearby park within the UNDC district so the agency can plan for the construction of a 35-story office building on the park site.

    The Robert Moses playground, located on First Avenue, between 41st and 42nd streets, would remain open during the planning process.

    Now 52 years old, the U.N. Secretariat building needs major structural renovations and security upgrades, Assembly bill sponsor Steven Sanders (D-Manhattan) said.

    The new office building on the park site would serve as a temporary home while the U.N. headquarters is renovated.

    After the renovation, the office building on the park site would be used to consolidate the U.N. offices that are now spread around Midtown, officials said.

    The project has been opposed by the local community board, which feared the loss of the park land, despite a plan to create a new esplanade along the East River.

    The legislation was recently agreed upon by the GOP-led state Senate and the Democratic-controlled Assembly and has strong support from the Bloomberg administration. Sanders insisted that it allows only for the planning to move forward and should not be seen as final approval for the project.

    "I think there are a lot of people who would just as soon have the U.N. pack its bags — as it occasionally threatens to do — and move elsewhere," Sanders said.

    "But the city very much wants the U.N. to remain in the city."

    Before the planning begins in earnest, congressional approval will be needed to guarantee a $1 billion to $2 billion loan for the expansion project, he said.

    One city official said the Bloomberg administration is confident of congressional support for the project.

    With the Senate expected to act on the legislation today, Sanders said the Assembly will likely follow suit in coming weeks.

    "This bill is not the end of the process, but the beginning," Sanders said.

    State lawmakers have until June 30 to grant final approval to the project.


    Copyright 2004 NYP Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. #26

    Default

    NY POST

    EXPANSION POST-PONED

    By KENNETH LOVETT

    November 19, 2004 -- ALBANY — The Legislature yesterday abruptly postponed a vote on a measure to expand the U.N. headquarters after a lawmaker fumed that the world body doesn't deserve help because it is "corrupt, ineffective and a drain on New York City resources."

    Sen. Martin Golden (R-Brooklyn) said it wasn't until he read yesterday's Post that he learned the Republican-led state Senate was set to act on the bill. It would launch planning for the renovation of the United Nations and construction of a new 35-story building on nearby city-owned parkland.

    Golden was particularly miffed that U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan has refused to turn over documents to congressional investigators related to the oil-for-food program scandal.

    "This is hardly the time to reward an organization that is either thoroughly incompetent or completely corrupt by granting it the ability to build additional buildings in New York City and in our state," Golden said.


    While the Senate scrapped the vote, users of the Robert Moses Playground just south of the United Nations complained yesterday about losing land to the new building. The city has promised to make up for the lost park with a new esplanade along the East River.

    "Move [the U.N.] to Washington, D.C.," said Rob Hagen, 34. "That's a nice, corrupt town for them to go to."

    "It's not like the city has a lot of places people can go and take their dogs," said Robert Kelly, 32, a dog-walker.


    City bus driver Ralph Horowitz, 58, said the park serves as a bathroom break for drivers since it's the last stop on the line.

    "I'll knock at the door of the U.N. and bother them," Horowitz said of what he'd do if the parkland is lost.

    Senate spokesman John McArdle said no decision has been made whether the U.N. legislation will be on the agenda when the Senate meets again next month.

    Roy Goodman, a former state senator who now heads the United Nations Development Corp., warned that if the project falls through, the United Nations — and the $3 billion it pumps into the city's economy — could leave New York.

    The Post reported yesterday that the Senate and Democratic-controlled state Assembly had quietly agreed on the legislation that would allow the United Nations to start environmental and land-use reviews for the renovations and new building.


    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Roy Goodman, a former state senator who now heads the United Nations Development Corp., warned that if the project falls through, the United Nations — and the $3 billion it pumps into the city's economy — could leave New York.
    That's nothing. At least the dogs would have a place to poop.

  12. #27
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Golden was particularly miffed that U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan has refused to turn over documents to congressional investigators related to the oil-for-food program scandal.

    "This is hardly the time to reward an organization that is either thoroughly incompetent or completely corrupt by granting it the ability to build additional buildings in New York City and in our state," Golden said.
    This loser guy Golden is just a damn NY senator, he should shut his trap and leave the international politics to the Feds.

    "Move [the U.N.] to Washington, D.C.," said Rob Hagen, 34. "That's a nice, corrupt town for them to go to."

    "It's not like the city has a lot of places people can go and take their dogs," said Robert Kelly, 32, a dog-walker.

    City bus driver Ralph Horowitz, 58, said the park serves as a bathroom break for drivers since it's the last stop on the line.

    "I'll knock at the door of the U.N. and bother them," Horowitz said of what he'd do if the parkland is lost.
    These damn NIMBYS get me so upset. Why should the UN leave? They have been in NY longer than these dumb losers. Why don't they and their dogs leave?

  13. #28
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,298

    Default

    From what I've heard, whenever the question of relocating has surfaced in the UN, they all come to the same answer: No one wants to leave New York.

  14. #29

    Default

    A look at the park site (center block) that would be the location of the new tower...



  15. #30
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Manhattan
    Posts
    2,636

    Default

    with all the UN problems and america wanting to not fund this do-nothing organization, this deal may not happen

Page 2 of 17 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. JFK Airport Terminal 5 - by Eero Saarinen | Renovation & Expansion - by gensler
    By Edward in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 96
    Last Post: April 16th, 2015, 01:43 AM
  2. Hoboken Ferry Terminal Renovation
    By Zoe in forum New York Metro
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: January 14th, 2012, 08:19 AM
  3. The Fuller Building renovation - 42-story Art Deco trophy - by Walker & Gillette
    By Edward in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 25th, 2010, 10:37 PM
  4. Parachute Jump Renovation - Pictures
    By Gulcrapek in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: August 20th, 2006, 05:08 PM
  5. Station Renovation - East New York
    By Gulcrapek in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: July 30th, 2004, 09:59 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software