Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 63

Thread: Knickerbocker Hotel - by Marvin & Davis, Bruce Price and Trowbridge & Livingston

  1. #1

    Default Knickerbocker Hotel - by Marvin & Davis, Bruce Price and Trowbridge & Livingston

    August 22, 2003

    After More Than Four Years of Reconstruction, a Landmark Is Unwrapped in Times Square

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP

    More resplendent now than when it disappeared four and a half years ago, the former Hotel Knickerbocker has emerged from a cocoon of scaffolding, netting and billboards to reclaim its place as the Beaux-Arts tiara of Times Square.

    When scaffolding enveloped the 16-story landmark at Broadway and 42nd Street in March 1999, it was supposed to be only until the following year. But the complex job of restoring the facade "grew threefold," said Gerard Nocera, executive vice president of S L Green Realty Corporation, which owns the building.

    So ever since the end of the 20th century, the most architecturally exuberant corner of the Times Square crossroads had been encased in an exoskeleton covered with advertising for the Gap, Target and Apple.

    In recent days, it finally came back to light: a vibrant facade of red brick alternating with quoin-edged bays of terra cotta and limestone ornament, some of it painstakingly reproduced in fiberglass-reinforced concrete, under a crested, three-story mansard roof, much of which has been replaced with copper that already has a verdigris patina.

    "We watched the release of the Knickerbocker from her commercial corset with a mixture of excitement and anticipation," said Tim Tompkins, president of the Times Square Business Improvement District, employing a full measure of gilded-age hyperbole with a hint of Times Square naughtiness. "And we are thrilled that she has now bared her beauty for all the world to see."

    Even the normally understated Robert B. Tierney, chairman of the Landmarks Preservation Commission, could not restrain himself yesterday when he heard the scaffolding had come down. "That's spectacular," he said. "I'm ecstatic."

    Speaking of the elaborate facade, James R. Pesci Jr., a vice president of S L Green, said: "What you see is the jewelry. What you're not seeing is the skin and bones." By that, he meant the new air-conditioning, plumbing, electrical service and bathrooms, and the renovated lobby.

    The Knickerbocker Hotel opened in 1906 and counted Enrico Caruso among its guests. (At the time, the Metropolitan Opera was only three blocks away.) It boasted of having two direct underground entrances to the new subway system.

    These were closed long ago. The Knickerbocker failed as a hotel and in 1921 was turned into an office building. Now known as 1466 Broadway or 6 Times Square, it is largely inhabited by garment showrooms. There are also three floors of offices.

    Some faint vestiges of Knickerbocker days remain. The elevator lobby has a rosette-studded vaulted ceiling that reproduces the original, parts of which were found above a dropped ceiling. In the basement and subbasement are bits of paneling and wainscoting, some hexagonal white tile, and a herringbone-pattern brick floor that may once have been part of the hotel's wine cellar.

    The most tantalizing remnant, however, is not at 6 Times Square at all but in the Times Square subway station. Over a door at one end of the shuttle platform is a lintel inscribed simply, "Knickerbocker."


    Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

  2. #2

    Default Knickerbocker Hotel



    From forgotten-ny.com

  3. #3

    Default Knickerbocker Hotel

    The view of Times Square Tower under construction and Knickerbocker Hotel from Avenue of the Americas. 2 August 2003.


  4. #4

    Default Knickerbocker Hotel

    Landmarks has nothing to say about that redhead?

  5. #5

    Default Knickerbocker Hotel

    Maybe historically that wall was used for advertising.

  6. #6

    Default Knickerbocker Hotel

    It should be fully restored and be made into a hotel again, either that or build more modern offices overhead.

  7. #7

    Default Knickerbocker Hotel

    I thought it was taking so long precisely because it was being restored to use as a hotel. *I'm a little dissapointed that it's not, but it's nice to finally see the classic facade instead of ugly scaffolding. *It's a perfect foil to all that new glass.

  8. #8
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Garden City, LI
    Posts
    1,778

    Default Knickerbocker Hotel

    It'll be a remarkable picture when 1BP is built across the street - all the new towers, TS, and this beauty stuck in between. *Classic.

  9. #9

    Default Knickerbocker Hotel

    Kind of reminds me of the old Astor Hotel. I sure miss that one.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Ryan
    Kind of reminds me of the old Astor Hotel. I sure miss that one.
    Yeah, and Astor was even better.

  11. #11
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    New Owners Plan to Bring Knickerbocker Hotel Back to Times Square


    By CHARLES V. BAGLI
    Published: June 5, 2006


    The Knickerbocker, a Beaux-Arts landmark in Times Square, has served as an unremarkable warren of offices and textile showrooms for the past 85 years.

    But the new owners — the royal family of Dubai — want to restore the Knickerbocker to its glory, when it was an elegant hotel nicknamed the 42nd Street Country Club, where Enrico Caruso often stayed, where Maxfield Parrish's 30-foot long painting, "Old King Cole," hung, and where, some say, the martini was invented.

    The royal family bought the 16-story red brick building at the southeast corner of Broadway and 42nd Street last week for $300 million and said it planned to convert the office space into a five-star hotel with 250 to 300 rooms. With its terra cotta and limestone ornaments on the façade and a three-story mansard roof, the Knickerbocker still stands out in a resurgent Times Square.

    "At this point, everything seems to be a go for turning it back into a hotel," said David L. Jackson, chief investment officer for Istithmar, an investment arm of the royal family. "We think there's room for at least one higher-end hotel catering to the business and entertainment community."

    In a telephone interview on Saturday, Mr. Jackson said the company expected to select an architect within the next two weeks. The plans would have to be approved by the city's Landmark Preservation Commission.

    The Knickerbocker is only the latest item the royal family has picked up in a gold-plated shopping spree in Manhattan. Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, the crown prince of Dubai, the oil-rich Arab emirate on the Persian Gulf, has been eager to diversify his investments.

    Istithmar expects to close tomorrow on the $1.2 billion purchase of 280 Park Avenue, a 43-story, 1.2 million-square-foot skyscraper. In the last eight months, it has closed on the 40-story tower at 450 Lexington Avenue for $600 million and the 34-story, gold-crowned building at 230 Park, between 45th and 46th Streets, for $705 million. Last year, a separate Dubai company bought the Essex House, an Art Deco hotel on Central Park South, for $440 million.

    In January, Istithmar acquired Inchcape Shipping Services, a British company that operates in more than 20 United States ports, including New York-New Jersey. A bid by another Dubai company, DP World, to take over the operation of some major American terminals that was dropped after an outcry in Congress.

    The Knickerbocker has changed hands a number of times in recent years, with each new owner considering a hotel conversion. But Istithmar appears to be serious about it. The Hotel Knickerbocker opened during the Gilded Age in 1906, financed by John Jacob Astor and designed by Marvin & Davis, Bruce Price and Trowbridge & Livingston. George M. Cohan was among its frequent guests and Caruso sang for fans from the balcony of his suite.

    Some historians of the cocktail credit the hotel's bartender, Signor Martini di Arma di Taggia, with inventing the martini in 1912. Parrish's painting of "Old King Cole" hung in the main barroom, but was later moved to the St. Regis hotel. But the fashionable hotel did not last; it closed in 1921. It was known as the Newsweek Building from 1940 to 1959, when the magazine made its home there.

    Still, its value has continued to soar. Istithmar bought the property from Sitt Asset Management, which had acquired the building in 2004 for $160 million.

    Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

  12. #12
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    The royal family bought the 16-story red brick building at the southeast corner of Broadway and 42nd Street last week for $300 million and said it planned to convert the office space into a five-star hotel with 250 to 300 rooms.
    Folks, that's a lot of money for a not-so-large building. Nearly one million a room. Staggering.

  13. #13

    Default

    Well they paid 1.2 billion for this crap:



    600 mil for this:



    Good ol Helmsley went for 705 mil:

    Last edited by LeCom; June 5th, 2006 at 11:00 PM.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward
    The view of Times Square Tower under construction and Knickerbocker Hotel from Avenue of the Americas. 2 August 2003.

    This is great news. The Knickerbocker building is magnificent!

    P.S.: It seems like so long ago that the corners of 42nd and 43rd and 6th were infested with these filthy buildings! Thank goodness they're gone!

  15. #15

    Default

    A. the building on park is NOT CRAP

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. W New York - Times Square Hotel
    By hyperfine in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: January 18th, 2005, 08:55 PM
  2. Skyline Hotel 10th Avenue - How is the area?
    By Annie Wood in forum Questions and Answers about New York City
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: August 31st, 2003, 04:56 PM
  3. HAMPTONS PRICE TAG BECOMES $75M JOKE
    By billyblancoNYC in forum New York Metro
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: August 21st, 2003, 08:50 AM
  4. Peninsula Hotel
    By ddny in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: February 4th, 2003, 01:36 PM
  5. Pictures of luxurious W Hotel - Times Square
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: December 29th, 2001, 12:36 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software