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Thread: The 2016 Presidential Race

  1. #16

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    You know you're in trouble when Rick Santorum is the sane one.

    Jeb Bush has to be drooling right now.

  2. #17

    Default Republicans Are Divided on Proper Role for U.S. Abroad

    I don't agree with Rand Paul on much, but I agree with him on this, if this is in fact his position, although I think the analogy to Kosovo which was a successful campaign, is unfortunate

    Now, a new generation of Republicans like Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky is turning inward, questioning the approach that reached its fullest expression after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and signaling a willingness to pare back the military budgets that made it all possible
    Some Republicans are so nervous about the positions championed by Mr. Paul and his supporters that they have begun talking about organizing to beat back primary challenges from what Dan Senor, a veteran of the younger Mr. Bush’s team of foreign policy advisers, described as a push to reorient the party toward a “neo-isolationist” foreign policy. That policy, Mr. Senor said, “is sparking discussions among conservative donors, activists and policy wonks about creating a political network to support internationalist Republicans.”




    March 14, 2013

    Republicans Are Divided on Proper Role for U.S. Abroad

    By MICHAEL D. SHEAR

    WASHINGTON — For more than three decades, the Republican Party brand has been deeply tied to a worldview in which the aggressive use of American power abroad is both a policy imperative and a political advantage.

    Now, a new generation of Republicans like Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky is turning inward, questioning the approach that reached its fullest expression after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and signaling a willingness to pare back the military budgets that made it all possible.

    That holds the potential to threaten two wings of a Republican national security establishment that have been warring for decades: the internationalists who held sway under the elder President George Bush and the neoconservatives who led the country to long and costly wars in Iraq and Afghanistan under President George W. Bush.

    Members of both camps said this week that they fear returning to a minimalist foreign policy, as articulated in different ways by Mr. Paul, Senator Mike Lee of Utah and Representative Justin Amash of Michigan. The foreign policy hawks fear it would lead to a diminished role for America in an increasingly unstable world. And they worry about their party losing its firm grasp of what has traditionally been a winning issue.
    “A real challenge for the Republicans as they approach 2016 is what will be their brand?” said Richard N. Haass, the president of the Council on Foreign Relations and a former aide to the first President Bush. “The reason Rand Paul is gaining traction is overreaching in Iraq. What he is articulating represents an alternative to both.”

    The split in the party was on display in muted terms here on Thursday at the opening session of the Conservative Political Action Conference when Senator Marco Rubio, Republican of Florida and a possible presidential candidate in 2016, expressed concern about a return to isolationism. Without mentioning Mr. Paul directly, Mr. Rubio said that the United States “can’t solve every war” but added that “we also can’t be retreating from the world.”

    Moments later, Mr. Paul told the conference that the filibuster he conducted last week over the Obama administration’s drone policy was aimed at the limits on presidential power and American power abroad. “No one person gets to decide the law,” he said.

    Some Republicans are so nervous about the positions championed by Mr. Paul and his supporters that they have begun talking about organizing to beat back primary challenges from what Dan Senor, a veteran of the younger Mr. Bush’s team of foreign policy advisers, described as a push to reorient the party toward a “neo-isolationist” foreign policy. That policy, Mr. Senor said, “is sparking discussions among conservative donors, activists and policy wonks about creating a political network to support internationalist Republicans.”

    But in Mr. Paul and the Tea Party, Republicans face a philosophical disagreement from within their ranks. Senator John McCain of Arizona, who is his party’s most prominent spokesman for an aggressive foreign policy, recently dismissed Mr. Paul and those who agree with him as “wacko birds.”

    But other party leaders are rushing to embrace Mr. Paul and Tea Party Republicans as they build coalitions of young voters who dislike the foreign wars and the cost of fighting them. Those voters may be a key to winning back the White House in 2016.

    After Mr. Paul’s 13-hour filibuster last week, leading Republican figures heaped praise on the freshman senator. Senator Ted Cruz of Texas and Mr. Lee joined the filibuster, offering their ideological support for his cause. Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican Party, said Mr. Paul “was able to capture some national attention in standing up to the president. My view is that he is an important voice in our party.”

    Mr. Haass said Republican leaders are beginning to recognize the electoral power appeal among some voters to Mr. Paul’s foreign policy views.
    “Some of what Rand Paul says resonates,” he said. “Either party that ignores it does so at its peril. On the other hand, one does not simply want to embrace it because it goes too far.”

    Mr. Paul calls himself a “realist, not a neoconservative nor an isolationist.” But his view of America resembles that of his father, former Representative Ron Paul, who built a deeply committed following of libertarians and Tea Party Republicans by opposing most American involvement overseas.

    Senator Paul, who is mulling a presidential bid in 2016, is less strident and more subtle than his father. In a speech at the Heritage Foundation last month, he insisted he is not against all foreign intervention, but pledged to fight for “a saner, more balanced approach to foreign policy.”
    The question for the Republican Party is whether Mr. Paul and his followers will emerge as a vocal enough part of the Republican electorate to reshape the party’s foreign policy without taking it back to the strictly isolationist approach.

    “This is a divide that has been festering and deepening for a generation,” said Thomas Donnelly, a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative policy group. “It’s bad for the country, bad for the party in a whole host of ways — particularly in presidential elections.”
    Some Republicans are less worried. They view Mr. Paul’s crusade as nothing more than the usual attempt by members of the opposition party to undermine the assertive foreign policy of an incumbent president.

    In the 1980s, Democrats harshly criticized President Ronald Reagan’s attempts to arm Nicaraguan rebels. During the 1990s, Republicans derisively called President Bill Clinton’s intervention in Kosovo “Clinton’s war.” In Mr. Obama’s first term, critics assailed his expansion of the war against terrorism, including the expanded use of drones.

    “The last three presidents have worried about a rising tide of isolationism,” said Peter D. Feaver, a professor of political science at Duke University who served as a national security aide for both Mr. Clinton and the younger Mr. Bush. “Sometimes it’s the protectionist sentiments among Democrats. Sometimes it’s the libertarian, extreme wing of the Republican Party. Sometimes it’s just war fatigue.”

    Mr. Feaver said that many Republicans who praised Mr. Paul do not share his broader views about a limited role for the United States abroad. “Part of what you’re hearing is cheerleading for someone on our side who actually dunked the ball and it actually went through the net,” Mr. Feaver said.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/15/us...gewanted=print

  3. #18

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    That holds the potential to threaten two wings of a Republican national security establishment that have been warring for decades: the internationalists who held sway under the elder President George Bush and the neoconservatives who led the country to long and costly wars in Iraq and Afghanistan under President George W. Bush.
    Mr. Paul calls himself a “realist, not a neoconservative nor an isolationist.” But his view of America resembles that of his father, former Representative Ron Paul, who built a deeply committed following of libertarians and Tea Party Republicans by opposing most American involvement overseas.

    Senator Paul, who is mulling a presidential bid in 2016, is less strident and more subtle than his father. In a speech at the Heritage Foundation last month, he insisted he is not against all foreign intervention, but pledged to fight for “a saner, more balanced approach to foreign policy.”
    If Rand Paul is a "realist," then it's something new. Maybe the realism is about seeking a presidential nomination, but his rhetoric from two years ago has not been somewhere between the GOP internationalists and the neocons; it's been the isolationism of his father.

    The last time the US retreated from international involvement and adopted an isolationist policy, it expedited the biggest disaster in world history.

    I would ask Paul one question, "What would you do about North Korea?"

  4. #19

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    He claims not to be an isolationist, but you are correct, his past positions would indicate he is in fact one. It is a slippery slope; isolationism is not only dangerous but at times immoral. Yet, we cannot continue to be as active geopolitically as we have been in the past - we literally cannot afford to fund these endeavors.

    Multi-lateralism works best for me.

  5. #20
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Classic Daily Show VID!!!

    Tonight Lewis Black responded to 2016 Presidential hopeful, Governor Rick Perry, and his call for NY businesses to move to Texas ...

    WATCH the VID: http://www.nymiddlefingertx.com/





  6. #21

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    Lewis Black is an eddhead fave, and this was one of his best Daily Show bits.

    I was travelling to Chicago one Saturday morning, out of Newark maybe 5-8 years ago. It was real early in the morning and one of those rare quiet moments in an airport terminal. I was sitting by the gate reading the paper, waiting to board - talking on the phone in fact to my now wife who was witing for me in Chicago, when I looked up and saw him sitting across from me, by himself quitely enjoyng a beverage. I am a huge fan, so I sheepishly introduced myself to him, and told him how much I admire his work.

    He was extremely gracious, very low key, almost shy. He thanked me for the compliment and shook my hand. It got a bit awkward for a moment, so I just wished him a good day and moved on.

    I can't stress enough how struck I was by his humbleness, graciousness and even shyness. Really a nice man.

  7. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddhead View Post
    Thanks for the PPP link BTW, where I was surprised (but than again not) to see this:



    This is a state that receives far more in federal spending and support than they pay out in federal income taxes. How do these people propose to make up the difference? Do they think they can go it alone, support their current lifestyle, and not see an increase in taxes? Do they expect the rest of us to provide defense?

    I think we should let them go. More money in my pocket.

  8. #23
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Where do I sign?

  9. #24
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Can I sign Twice? (Once for my dea....previously deposed, Grandfather?)

  10. #25

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    Has anyone been following the story of the four day lane closure of GW Bridge from Sept 9 - 12?

    Two of three approach lanes were closed, causing massive gridlock in Fort Lee NJ. Dem mayor Mark Sokolich had refused to endorse Chris Christie for governor. Christie was way ahead in the polls, but it was no secret that he was looking for a message of bi-partisan support.

    The story began circulating that it was political retribution for the mayor's denial of support. The reasoning seemed so petty that the story began to take on the aspect of a conspiracy theory. Christie made jokes about it.

    But it didn't go away, and the question became - if political retribution isn't the truth, what is the truth? It now has political legs (beyond New Jersey). Christie's high school friend, David Wildstein, has already, resigned, and Bill Baroni, appointed Deputy Executive Director of the PA by Christie, is on the hot seat.

    At a hearing, Baroni gave his explanation (not under oath). On Monday, sworn testimony from three PA officials did not corroborate Baroni. There are calls for him to be called back to testify under oath.

    One bit of information from the hearing:
    When he ordered the study only days before it was to go into effect, Wildstein, according to testimony, instructed the bridge manager not to tell anyone about it — not even Fort Lee police, who records show, quickly complained the resulting delays could slow emergency vehicles.

    Bridge Manager Robert Durando said he believed Wildstein’s order to keep quiet was “wrong,” but he said he didn’t speak up because he feared the consequences of defying Christie’s No. 2 at the agency.
    http://gothamist.com/2013/12/10/chri...sed_down_g.php

  11. #26
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Rachel Maddow is all over this. And loving every second of it.

  12. #27

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    GW scandal is a bridge to Chris Christie's past

    Paul Mulshine/The Star Ledger By Paul Mulshine/The Star Ledger
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    on December 11, 2013 at 8:23 AM, updated December 12, 2013 at 11:26 AM






    "Christie had a scorched-earth approach to rising in politics." former Morris Democratic chairman Paul Bangiola
    View full sizeSenator Loretta Weinberg listens as Port Authority officials testify Monday.
    (Tony Kurdzuk/The Star-Ledger)

    Wally Edge was a Republican who served two terms as governor of New Jersey separated by a stint in the U.S. Senate. He died in 1956, but his name lived on into the 21st century as the alias of a political pundit by the name of David Wildstein.
    Wildstein is perhaps the only man in New Jersey even more politically ambitious than our governor, with whom he attended Livingston High School. While Christie famously volunteered to campaign for Tom Kean Sr. at the age of 14, Wildstein did so at the age of 12.
    Wildstein made it as far as mayor of Livingston, but his career in electoral politics hit a dead end in the 1980s when he was still in his 20s. In 2000, Wildstein employed his encyclopedic knowledge of New Jersey politics to found the political website that became politickernj.com, writing under the pen name “Wally Edge.”
    Wildstein didn’t reveal his real identity until 2010, when he became his former high-school buddy‘s “eyes and ears” at the Port Authority, according to a remarkably prescient profile in the Record last year by reporter Shawn Boburg. Boburg quoted Wildstein’s fellow workers there as calling him “intimidating, hardworking, intelligent, private and fiercely loyal to the governor.”
    Just how fiercely loyal is a question that could have a big impact on the governor’s future political future.
    In September, Democrats began making what sounded like wild accusations that someone at the Port Authority had shut down two of the three access lanes to the George Washington Bridge in Fort Lee to get revenge on the mayor for not endorsing Christie in his campaign for re-election.
    That sounded farfetched – until Monday. That’s when the Democrat-controlled state Assembly held a hearing at which two Port Authority employees testified under oath that Wildstein had not only ordered them to close the lanes on Sept. 9 but also ordered them not to warn Fort Lee officials of the chaos that would inevitably ensue. (See video below.)

    Wildstein at first claimed that he shut the lanes for a traffic study, but on Monday employees testified there was no such study. So what was the reason?

    Wildstein’s not saying - yet. But he has resigned his $150,000-a-year post as third in command at the Port Authority.
    Whatever the explanation, it won’t surprise the people who know the governor from his early days in politics. Morristown lawyer Paul Bangiola was the county Democratic chairman in the 1990s. He had a front seat to watch the future governor get a start in politics almost as unpromising as Wildstein’s.
    “Christie had a scorched-earth approach to rising in politics,” Bangiola said. “He was out of step with the local Republican organization.”
    Christie was so out of step that his fellow Republicans ousted him in a primary after his one term as a freeholder. He lost a state Assembly race as well and was “so far out in the wilderness that nobody wanted to be associated with him” by the late 1990s, Bangiola said.

    (File photo)


    The reason, according to another student of Morris County politics, lies in something that has become a stock passage in Christie’s stump speech. Former Morris County prosecutor Michael Murphy notes that the governor loves to talk about his upbringing in a household with an Irish father and a Sicilian mother. (See a clip from a London newspaper on that here.) Christie often contrasts the assertiveness of his mother with the passiveness of his father.“He’s half Gaelic and half garlic,” Murphy joked.
    On his Gaelic side, Christie conveys the considerable charm of an old-time Irish pol, said Murphy, who is the son of one such pol, Gov. Richard Hughes.
    “But every once in a while he lets the Sicilian side show,” he said.
    In his first year as governor, Christie did that so often that critics accused him of channeling Tony Soprano. He’s mellowed, however, and so far in this scandal he’s been indulging in good old Irish blarney. When asked about the bridge closing last week, Christie joked, ”I moved the cones actually, unbeknownst to everybody.”

    But Christie can’t be laughing after Monday’s hearing. The Democrat who represents that part of Bergen County in the state Senate, Loretta Weinberg, told me yesterday she expects the Assembly Democrats to subpoena Wildstein next.

    “I think that the main thing we want to hear from David Wildstein is, did anyone from the governor’s office have a discussion with him about doing this?” Weinberg said.
    The answers promise to be quite interesting. Too bad Wally Edge won’t be providing his trademark insightful commentary.
    ALSO: Esteemed Republican political analyst Carl Golden echoes my thoughts on how perilous this issue could be for Christie.

  13. #28

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    There is nothing like a good scandal!!

  14. #29

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    Something familiar about all this.

    Several years ago it was Pataki + WTC = White House.

    So now it's Christie + Sandy?

  15. #30

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    Chris Christie's Bridge Scandal Might Have Just Become a Very Big Problem

    Philip Bump

    New documents released under subpoena by a Chris Christie ally quote an aide close to the New Jersey governor as saying that it was "[t]ime for some traffic problems in Fort Lee" — the town that suffered massive traffic problems in September which, its mayor claims, was retribution for his not endorsing Christie's reelection.

    The controversy was been roiling for several months now, with both David Wildstein, that long-time Christie ally and friend, and his boss at the Port Authority, Bill Baroni, resigning from the agency as the New Jersey Assembly investigates the traffic jams. For a week in September, coinciding with the first week of school, several lanes of access to the heavily-trafficked George Washington Bridge were inexplicably closed, taking the town of Fort Lee, at the bridge's western end, completely by surprise. The disruption lasted for four days, eventually ending on Friday of the week after the town's mayor, Mark Sokolich, wrote a letter to the agency. In that letter, he suggested that the closures were "punitive."

    The documents, obtained by obtained by The Record and shared on Twitter by the Wall Street Journal's Tedd Mann, seem to reinforce Sokolich's concerns.

    The first document, released by Wildstein in response to a subpoena according to The Record, is an email from Bridget Anne Kelly, a senior staff member in Christie's administration.



    That email message (to which Wildstein tersely replied "Got it") arrived in August. From The Record:

    The private messages, mostly sent through personal e-mails accounts, indicate that Kelly, a senior staff member in the governor’s office, was involved in the planning and received updates during the week of the traffic jams. She was also informed that week that Christie’s executives at the Port Authority were ignoring the Fort Lee mayor’s desperate attempts to get a reason for the sudden unannounced closures, as the borough’s first responders struggled to respond to emergencies and buses arrived late on the first day of school.

    In another document released by Wildstein, he and an unidentified person feign sympathy at the effect of the lane closures.


    Barbara Buono was Christie's Democratic opponent in his reelection last year.

    In December, the New Jersey State Assembly started looking at the closures, which Baroni and Wildstein claimed was part of a traffic study. The head of the Port Authority, which is run jointly by the states of New York and New Jersey, indicated that no such study was underway. Wildstein resigned from the agency in November; Baroni followed him last month.

    When Christie was asked about the growing scandal, he joked, "I moved the cones, actually, unbeknownst to everybody." That sarcastic dismissiveness of the issue is undermined significantly by these new documents — and could prove a significant problem for the 2016 hopeful.

    Copyright ©2014 by The Atlantic Monthly Group

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