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Thread: Newark Development

  1. #1501

    Default

    More bad planning:

    Parents Take a Stand at Newark's Speedway Elementary


    by Zoe Baldwin
    The new Speedway Elementary School was built near two busy roads and the Garden State Parkway.

    On Wednesday, February 3, the parents and community of Speedway Elementary School in Newark will hold a meeting to address the many safety concerns surrounding the location of the new school.
    As previously reported in MTR, the new Speedway Elementary School was built along two very busy roadways and near ramps for the Garden State Parkway, without a playground or safe access to a large park across the street. The new building will house K-5 in its first year of operation, with pre-kindergarten and middle school students moving in during the 2011-12 school year.
    Officials from the Schools Development Authority, NJDOT, NJ State Senate, Essex County and the City of Newark have been invited to help the community address concerns before children move into the new building. The agenda will cover the lack of crossing guards and the need for traffic calming near the school, the lack of a permanent certificate of occupancy, the lack of a security plan to deal with the troubled public housing development next door, the lack of a playground, and lack of outside space for children in case of a fire or other emergency.
    The meeting will begin at 6:30pm at the old Speedway school (26 Speedway Ave.), and is hosted by Councilman Ron Rice, in conjunction with the school’s Parent Liaison, the Speedway PTA, One Newark Education Coalition, and the Tri-State Transportation Campaign.

  2. #1502

    Default

    Someday: http://newarksriver.files.wordpress....workdraft1.pdf


    Just an FYI i can see construction on the park from my window at work, they are building a barrier to keep the sand from eroding for now.





    Draft Proposal: Newark Riverfront Development Framework January 4, 2010, 10:36 pm
    Filed under: Down by the river, Newark
    On December 15, over 75 Newarkers came to City Hall to learn about, discuss, and debate proposed rules to govern the future development of the Newark Riverfront. Below, please find links to download the Draft Proposal for a Newark Riverfront Development Framework that was presented at the meeting.
    While many details remain to be resolved, the PDF presentation and accompanying maps (10 megabytes) provide a vision for Land Use, Height, Open Space, and Public Access along the riverfront from the North Ward through the Ironbound.
    (Further background may be found in the Riverfront Development Workbooks, available for download here.)
    Please share any questions or comments with a Comment Sheet. Based upon feedback received at the 12/15 public meeting and subsequently, the planning team will now complete a full draft for public review.
    Stay tuned for our next public meeting in February.


    2 Comments
    Last edited by block944; February 1st, 2010 at 04:46 PM.

  3. #1503

    Thumbs up Nets to Newark for at least 2 years

    http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/ba...ng_newark.html

    New Jersey Nets nearing move to Newark, will play in Prudential Center until move to Brooklyn

    BY Julian Garcia and Mitch Lawrence
    DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITERS
    Tuesday, February 2nd 2010, 4:00 AM


    The Nets will have the cash and the assets to rebuild their team. Now all they need is a new place to play, and it appears they are close to getting it.

    While they are still on schedule to move to Brooklyn at some point in 2012, the Nets likely will be playing in Newark the next two seasons after reaching a preliminary lease agreement with the Devils to play their home games at the Prudential Center, according to a source familiar with the team's situation.

    According to the source, the Nets and Devils reached a new agreement last week and are expected to sign it this week. It should reach Gov. Chris Christie's desk soon after and it is expected to be approved.
    "It's going to happen," said a source familiar with the negotiations.
    The Nets and Devils, former co-tenants in the Meadowlands until the Devils moved to Newark in 2007-08, had already reached a lease agreement that was approved but not signed by former governor Jon Corzine. But when Corzine was unseated by Christie in November, that deal fell through, leaving the teams to start from scratch.

    Under terms of that previously agreed-upon deal, the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority would have waived a reported $7.5 million penalty that the Nets would have had to pay in order to break their lease at the Meadowlands. That penalty, which could be substantially lowered, according to one source, has apparently been a sticking point in the most recent negotiations.

    A call to Christie's office was not returned Monday.
    The Nets have been playing at the Meadowlands since it opened in 1981, but recently finalized plans to move to Brooklyn. Playing at the ultra-modern Rock may help the Nets sign free agents over the summer, when they will have upwards of $26 million to spend on contracts.
    "Ultimately, we're going to be moving to Brooklyn, so that would just be a temporary thing to play in Newark," Nets guard Keyon Dooling said after practice yesterday. "But the building in Newark is very nice and it's more NBA-suitable (than the Meadowlands). This is more about the building itself. The facility is nicer in Newark."

    The Nets are averaging 13,302 fans through 22 home games, and that number appears to be inflated. A pair of preseason games in Newark in October drew an average of 14,255.

    "I think the arena in Newark will be good for us," said center Brook Lopez. "I can't say if it will mean we'll get better crowds. But it's a good-looking arena and it worked very well for an NBA game when we were down there in preseason. The atmosphere was very good."

    Going into tonight's home game against the Pistons, the Nets (4-42) are not only on pace to break the all-time league record for fewest wins - nine, held by the 1972-73 Sixers - but they're also closing in on the franchise record for fewest home wins. The Nets were 10-31 at Nassau Coliseum in 1976-77 and 13-28 at the Meadowlands during the 1989-90 season. They are 3-19 at home this season.

  4. #1504

    Default

    Deal to have NJ Nets play two years at Prudential Center days away from governor's desk

    By Dave D'Alessandro/The Star-Ledger

    February 01, 2010, 11:28PM

    William Perlman/The Star-LedgerThe Prudential Center in NewarkThe partnership sought by the Nets and Devils is days away from being presented to the governor.

    The two sides met Friday in Newark to discuss a Prudential Center lease arrangement that would be sent to Gov. Chris Christie for his review after the Devils examine the term sheet the Nets presented to them Monday.

    "Obviously they’re trying to get it done as soon as possible," said one person close to the negotiation, who requested anonymity because he is not authorized to speak publicly. "But it’s not done yet. They’re hoping to get it done this week."

    According to officials on both sides, the discussions to move the Nets to the Prudential Center for the next two seasons have been as amicable as could be expected, as Nets CEO Brett Yormark and Devils owner Jeff Vanderbeek "clearly have the same goals," an official said.

    The lingering issue, however, pertains to the $7.5 million penalty the Nets face for breaking their Izod Center lease.

    Though his predecessor was willing to waive the fee, the sports and gaming committee of Christie’s transition team last week suggested the penalty should be upheld in a 20-page document it issued.

    Since then, however, the Nets have been informed the governor won’t personally address the issue until the sides agree on a lease deal.

    Both sides, of course, hope he relents, and comes to accept that it would help both buildings to maximize profits by turning Izod Center into the entertainment center of New Jersey.

    Completing the lease agreement is expected to "accelerate the governor’s position," which thus far has been "close to the vest," another official said last week.

    Much could be riding on it, especially if new owner Mikhail Prokhorov – who is expected to take over the team soon — is not amenable to a termination fee.

    Yormark would not comment on the negotiation late Monday night, other than to confirm that he met with Vanderbeek on Friday.

    The New York Daily News first reported the meeting early Monday night.

    The Nets played two preseason games on Oct. 13 and 21 at "The Rock," and both were surprisingly successful, as roughly 28,000 tickets were sold with assistance from Mayor Cory Booker’s office.

    The team was delighted, especially upon learning that 13 percent of its patrons used rail service to attend the games. In remarks about the Prudential Center weeks later, Yormark described the facility as "terrific," with "great new amenities. The fans seem to really enjoy it." And he was encouraged that there would be a "big concentration of fans from Essex, Middlesex and Union counties, which we don’t typically draw a lot from."

    The Nets plan to move to Brooklyn in 2012.

  5. #1505

    Default

    The Nets Upgrade to Newark




    Photo: Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images

    The Nets are moving! The Nets are moving! Immediately! Well, not immediately, and not yet to where you think — but the terms have finally been reached: The Nets are Newark-bound. They're very excited about it.
    No, they really are.
    "Ultimately, we're going to be moving to Brooklyn, so that would just be a temporary thing to play in Newark," Nets guard Keyon Dooling said after practice yesterday. "But the building in Newark is very nice and it's more NBA-suitable (than the Meadowlands). This is more about the building itself. The facility is nicer in Newark."
    Many believe that playing in Newark will help them potentially lure free agents this off-season. You heard that correctly: The general consensus is that the Nets will be able to use their home as a selling point, and that home will be Newark.
    And they're right. If you haven't been to the Prudential Center, it's much, much nicer than you realize it is, and it's a quick little five-minute walk from the PATH train. It's even kind of safe! Plus, unlike the Meadowlands, there are actually places within walking distance of the arena where you can buy a beer pre- or postgame. They're safe, too. Swear.
    This just made it about 3 percent more likely that you will go to a Nets game over the next two seasons — unless, of course, you're still a little mad about that impending eminent-domain thing.
    By the way, if we were a resident of East Rutherford, all logic aside, we'd be a little depressed that someone — a team, a citizen, a pet, anything — was so damned excited to relocate to Newark. That can't be good for real estate.


  6. #1506

    Default

    Essex officials tout plan to merge three vo-tech schools at Newark site

    By Philip Read/The Star-Ledger

    February 01, 2010, 6:38PM

    AMANDA BROWN/THE STAR-LEDGEREssex County Executive Joe DiVincenzo, left, speaks to Rev. Edward Leahy, Essex County Vo-Tech School Board President, while looking at an aerial photograph of the United Hospitals Medical Center in Newark. DiVincenzo held a press conference to speak about consolidating all three county vo-tech schools into one location in the unused United Hospitals property in Newark.
    NEWARK -- Essex County Executive Joseph DiVincenzo Jr. has talked for months about his vision to merge Bloomfield Tech, Newark’s North 13th Street Tech and West Caldwell Tech into a new campus that would provide a state-of-the-art facility and save costs.
    Today, that plan became more viable.
    "I have a site. The site is United Hospital," DiVincenzo said of the 7.8-acre Newark institution shuttered in 1997.
    The county executive also was armed with a freshly minted and lucrative change in a state funding formula, one making vo-techs eligible for 90 percent reimbursement for school construction instead of 48.6 percent, in line with "special needs" districts.
    Jon Corzine, in his waning days as governor, signed legislation advanced by state Sen. Richard Codey, D-Essex, granting higher reimbursement to county vo-techs that have at least 90 percent of their students coming from needy, or former Abbott, districts.
    "It’s about equity," Codey said today. "It clearly was the right thing to do. It took a couple years, but we got it done."
    Since then, DiVincenzo has met with Gov. Chris Christie; his chief of staff, Richard Bagger; and Bret Schundler, the education commissioner.
    "I’m asking for $20 million," DiVincenzo said of tapping the school construction fund during a ceremony at the circa 1928 North 13th Street Tech.
    That seed money would be used for the acquisition and demolition of the hospital — now a huge white tower of broken windows and crumbling walls — as well as design work for a new vo-tech school to replace the three aging schools. Of the four Essex vo-techs, the newer Newark Tech would remain. The three others would be sold. Construction would begin in 2012.
    But there is a sticking point.
    Essex County owns only 40 percent of the United Hospital property, purchased as part of former County Executive James Treffinger’s plan to close the old hospital center in Cedar Grove and move the county’s psychiatric patients to Newark.
    "We’re looking to buy the other 60 percent." DiVincenzo said . "It’s been an eyesore, a blight on the city of Newark.… Hopefully, we will be able to make a deal."
    Of late, the vo-tech schools have rung up a string of accolades. Bloomfield Tech, home of the fighting Spartans, won a coveted designation as a "National Blue Ribbon School." Newark Tech Principal Baruti Kafele just won the national Milkin Educator Award, and the district has been recognized in U.S. News & World Report’s list of America’s 1,000 Best High Schools.
    There was no shortage of school pride as Patricia Clark-Jeter, the principal of North 13th Street Tech, welcomed dignitaries to "The Home of the Cougars." Folding chairs bearing the image of the Cougar lined the gymnasium. But Clark-Jeter said she wasn’t sure of the mascot’s fate.
    "Hopefully, we’ll remain Cougars," she said. "That’s a good question. What will they call us?"
    Among the student body, the idea of a new school appeared to be well-received. "I wish I was going to be part of it," said Jaquan Kirkland, a junior.

  7. #1507

    Default

    New York Red Bulls soccer team to hold job fair for new arena

    By The Associated Press

    February 02, 2010, 3:35PM

    AP Photo/Mel EvansThe New York Red Bulls Stadium in Harrison, in a file photo taken Sept. 1, 2009.
    HARRISON -- The New York Red Bulls are opening a new soccer arena and are looking to fill about 500 part-time jobs.
    The Major League Soccer team announced today that it will be holding a job fair on Feb. 16 at the new Red Bull Arena in Harrison.
    The team said the part-time positions need to be filled before the grand opening on March 20. There are openings for kitchen staff, box office workers, security personnel, and concessions and retail workers, among others.
    The job fair will be held from 3 p.m. until 8 p.m.

  8. #1508

    Thumbs down Bah

    Pfft, let the Nets ownership eat cake.

    I cannot, for the life of me, see how this 'deal' is good for Newark. Newark will lose non-sport revenue, and what happens when the Nets eventually leave?

    Had this move happened 2 years ago I might've thrown support behind it...but do any of you really care about the Nets at this point?

  9. #1509

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 66nexus View Post
    Pfft, let the Nets ownership eat cake.

    I cannot, for the life of me, see how this 'deal' is good for Newark. Newark will lose non-sport revenue, and what happens when the Nets eventually leave?
    That was under the previous "deal". Now it isn't the case.

  10. #1510

    Default wait and see

    EH, the whole thing with the devils is just agravating. I honestly wish they would just go and that the NBA will realize that NJ still deserves a chance at a team. You can only hope that the Nets don't cost the arena any non sporting even dates. On another note I see Gonewarkrestuarant week is next week and it was cool to see the new brewery downtown has a link there even if they aren't open.

    http://www.gonewark.com/port44.html

  11. #1511
    Forum Veteran Newarkguy's Avatar
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    Default Newark was denser in the past.

    Quote Originally Posted by JCMAN320 View Post
    Yea your right 66nexus with the political geography; but in Newark most of its neighborhoods aren't very dense; there wasn't much stress to build up, it was much easier to build out then up for Newark.

    Yes JC is reliant on some bus service but since the HBLR opened buses have become less crowded. I remember before the lightrail opened the buses were always packed. Now since the lightrail opened the buses have become more efficent and less crowded and some bus lines disappered altogether because the lightrail took so many of their riders.

    The mass transit system in Newark needs to be improved especially the some of the bus routes. I work in Newark and have taken the buses and the routes need to be improved and the buses are not efficient and seriously unless you live in the North ward or have business up there, the lightrail is entirely useless plain and simple. Being 10 not bad but being so close to NYC and a major city with a key airport in the region it should be higher.
    Yes, JCman, Newark does not appear very dense now. However,at its zenith, Newark had a population of 450,000(they didn't do statistical sampling or adjust for undercounts back then like they do now,so perhaps Newark had 500,000.) In 1911 New Jersey changed annexation laws(so called home rule laws;suburbs were made more powerful than cities) to prevent Newark from retaking the rest of Essex county. NJ townships could annex and change borders without referenda. But when Newark, Trenton,Jersey city,Paterson and Camden sought to grow into metropolitan centers, annexation by fiat became taboo for townships.NJ did not want Newark to become a large rich international city of 1 million or more that could challenge Nj's traditional suburban domination of Trenton. Trapped in 19th century borders, Newark land values rose to the point that the city DID begin to build up up up. Parts of Broad street as well as Market st began to see the narrow 7-8 story buildings seen in NY's soho and lower manhattan area. Newark PSE&G trolleys (light rail) covered the entire region.Most urban and economic people of the era expected the manhattanization of downtown to spread to the rest of Newark, into Irvington and the oranges, untill the state had no choice but to consolidate Essex,and West hudson. But the stock market crash and the great depression, the closure of thousands of industries and loss of jobs, sealed Newark's doom. Newark had a supermajority of wood and brick 4 story tenements and apartment buildings. Many had beautifull Italian renaissance, Jewish or German style facades. 90% of these were all burned down or abandoned and city demolished between 1967 and 1980's. In between you had smaller wood frame multi fam structures, and the common 2-3 family home with the classic triangle roofs. Prince street was Newark's greenwich village. It was lined with apartment buildings and rivaled broad street and Springfield avenue as far as shopping streets went. In fact, the old third ward Prince street Springfield ave area was the residential arm of Downtown Newark. (Ironbound now plays the role)Dense, urban and city in every way. Sadly the entire area was bulldozed to build massive x and h shaped project towers. Today the entire area 1-2 square miles along Irvine Turner Blvd.is virtually all public housing townhouses. No retail(no local job opportunities) and no middle income dense urban development. A suburban public housing poverty reservation in the geographic center of Newark! Anyway, Newark light rail should go to irvington under Springfield avenue. Or Expand Springfield ave into a world class boulevard with the tracks at grade in the center island median.

  12. #1512

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Newarkguy View Post
    Yes, JCman, Newark does not appear very dense now. However,at its zenith, Newark had a population of 450,000(they didn't do statistical sampling or adjust for undercounts back then like they do now,so perhaps Newark had 500,000.) In 1911 New Jersey changed annexation laws(so called home rule laws;suburbs were made more powerful than cities) to prevent Newark from retaking the rest of Essex county. NJ townships could annex and change borders without referenda. But when Newark, Trenton,Jersey city,Paterson and Camden sought to grow into metropolitan centers, annexation by fiat became taboo for townships.NJ did not want Newark to become a large rich international city of 1 million or more that could challenge Nj's traditional suburban domination of Trenton. Trapped in 19th century borders, Newark land values rose to the point that the city DID begin to build up up up. Parts of Broad street as well as Market st began to see the narrow 7-8 story buildings seen in NY's soho and lower manhattan area. Newark PSE&G trolleys (light rail) covered the entire region.Most urban and economic people of the era expected the manhattanization of downtown to spread to the rest of Newark, into Irvington and the oranges, untill the state had no choice but to consolidate Essex,and West hudson. But the stock market crash and the great depression, the closure of thousands of industries and loss of jobs, sealed Newark's doom. Newark had a supermajority of wood and brick 4 story tenements and apartment buildings. Many had beautifull Italian renaissance, Jewish or German style facades. 90% of these were all burned down or abandoned and city demolished between 1967 and 1980's. In between you had smaller wood frame multi fam structures, and the common 2-3 family home with the classic triangle roofs. Prince street was Newark's greenwich village. It was lined with apartment buildings and rivaled broad street and Springfield avenue as far as shopping streets went. In fact, the old third ward Prince street Springfield ave area was the residential arm of Downtown Newark. (Ironbound now plays the role)Dense, urban and city in every way. Sadly the entire area was bulldozed to build massive x and h shaped project towers. Today the entire area 1-2 square miles along Irvine Turner Blvd.is virtually all public housing townhouses. No retail(no local job opportunities) and no middle income dense urban development. A suburban public housing poverty reservation in the geographic center of Newark! Anyway, Newark light rail should go to irvington under Springfield avenue. Or Expand Springfield ave into a world class boulevard with the tracks at grade in the center island median.

    To bad everyone's broke, what you see today is what you are going to get as the crazy manufacturing boom was in the late 1990's to 2005. Newark being the corrupt machine that is , squandered all those opportunities and now its to late. The price for sq/ft is so expensive in Newark it makes no sense to build here right now,

  13. #1513
    Forum Veteran Newarkguy's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Pay the guy a decent wage, they can afford it.

    Quote Originally Posted by stache View Post
    I still think the mascot should be paid enough so he can find housing, unless he already is and is not budgeting properly.
    Pay him a living wage and train him to umpire or some career in sports marketing. Can he play ball? there may be options if management is willing. budgeting could be an issue, I don't know...
    Last edited by Newarkguy; February 3rd, 2010 at 05:07 PM.

  14. #1514

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marv95 View Post
    That was under the previous "deal". Now it isn't the case.
    I do hope what you say is the case. Any word on the terms of the new deal?

  15. #1515

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 66nexus View Post
    I do hope what you say is the case. Any word on the terms of the new deal?
    Either a sharing agreement between the 2 facilities(which is good for the Rock since it doesn't have much to share to begin with) or basically nothing but a cooperative agreeement with the Devils and Nets as far as dates, revenue, etc. is concerned. We'll know soon...

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