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Thread: Newark Development

  1. #16
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Now comes the hard part in Urban Renewal for Newark.

    Gettin all them poor people out of there!


  2. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffreyny
    As Jersey City has more than gotten it's act together to compete with Manhattan, Newark, New Jersey's biggest city is virtually a waste land.
    While there are some old skyscrapers reminicent of a better day it would seem that nothing is planned to be built. The performing arts center is a plus but quite honestly if it weren't for Newark Liberty Airport, Newark would be about as important as Kalamazoo, Michigan is for to great Metropolis.
    What gives Newark?

  3. #18

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    Newark's classic example

    Courthouse is set to show off again

    Monday, June 28, 2004

    BY NIKITA STEWART
    Star-Ledger Staff

    More than 100 years ago, Essex County -- then one of the nation's wealthiest and most powerful counties -- wanted something to show off.

    Across the country, governments were erecting state capitols, city halls and courthouses designed with elegance and grandeur. Marble stairways, bronze sculptures and colossal Corinthian columns were the standard.

    Essex County would not be left out and spared no expense to construct a courthouse envisioned as the showcase for modern artisans.

    Cass Gilbert, who would later design the Woolworth Building in Manhattan and the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C., was the architect. He brought along other artisans who were part of a movement to beautify cities through neo-Classical architecture -- a merge of styles from Greek, Roman and Renaissance cultures.

    Sculptor Gutzon Borglum, who would later carve the faces of four presidents into Mount Rushmore, created a statue of President Abraham Lincoln to sit on the courthouse steps. Louis Comfort Tiffany designed the glasswork.

    The $2 million building -- an expensive venture at the time -- opened in 1906 to rave reviews.

    Now, after years of disrepair, neglect and legal wrangling, the building is returning to its grandeur.

    The county will unveil its $49 million restoration of the old Essex County Courthouse, located in Newark at the intersection of Market Street and Springfield Avenue, by the end of the year.

    "This courthouse is the centerpiece of Essex County," Joseph DiVincenzo, the county executive, said during a recent sneak-peek tour of the renovation.

    Newark historian Charles Cummings credits DiVincenzo with pushing the completion of the restoration.

    "We will never have another building like that. Never. Even if we had the money, because of the craftsmanship, the skill," he said. "It's a spectacular building that represented the best of the Golden Era."

    The restoration has been 14 years in the making, spurred by a lawsuit against the county by the Essex County Bar Association in 1990. The group of lawyers claimed the building was so dilapidated that it endangered the health and safety of its members.

    Superior Court Judge Robert Passero, the Passaic County assignment judge who presided over the case, ordered the building restored to its condition of 1929 -- the last year the county made significant renovations.

    The courthouse, which was shut down in 1997 for the restoration, will be used for civil court when it reopens. Last year, DiVincenzo announced that the county needed more time and more money to complete the project, but said it was one of his top priorities.

    For historians, architects and conservators, refurbishing the courthouse has been lovely labor, especially since Gilbert -- whose work fell out of favor as architecture became more modern -- is seeing a resurgence.

    "Cass Gilbert. I mean, Cass Gilbert. What can I say?" Audrey Malachowsky, a conservator working on the building, said gushing like a groupie talking about a rock star.

    Malachowsky is part of a 17-member crew from EverGreene Painting Studios of Manhattan meticulously restoring the murals, decorative canvases and woodwork.

    Every courtroom is unique -- 10 different designs and artwork, which is being carefully mended to make sure that the original paintings are unchanged.

    Using chemically mixed paint to match the period, EverGreene puts varnish over the paintings before touching them up so historians will know "100 years from now" what was done by the original artists and what was done by the restoration firm, said Nancy Barnett, EverGreene's supervisor of the courthouse project.

    Architect Michael Mills, who has been on the job since 1990, must make sure all new construction fits Gilbert's original design. He said his firm scoured the New York Historical Society for Gilbert's drawings before creating its own.

    The county wanted an extra courtroom so Mills' firm, Ford, Farewell, Mills & Gatsch Architects in Princeton, designed an 11th, with the idea that it would look just like an original courtroom across a hall.

    Mills said he has to admit the new courtroom is the lesser of the two. The original, which sits on the first floor, has walls of walnut and wood moldings with egg and dart designs, rosettes and Egyptian lotus motifs.

    The wood paneling in the new courtroom rises just 7 feet and there is no intricate woodwork.

    "Someone coming in the building will know it wasn't a Cass Gilbert design," Mills said, adding that his firm had to be cost-effective.

    That wasn't always the case 100 years ago. Before the courthouse was built, county residents protested when officials announced much of the building would be limestone. About 300 people signed a petition to force the use of marble.

    Gilbert also had the advantage of skilled artisans and craftsmen who were immigrating at the time, said Barbara Christen, a Cass Gilbert scholar.

    "Tradesmen came off the boat from Italy," said Christen, who edited "Cass Gilbert, Life and Work: Architect of the Public Domain." "They knew how to cut stone, how to lay it, mosaic work."

    The immigration wave coincided with the "City Beautiful" movement -- a trend that began in the 1890s toward urban planning and cleaning up cities through open space and majestic architecture. Gilbert was one of the stars in the movement.

    But the architect -- appointed chairman of the Council of Fine Arts by President Theodore Roosevelt and reappointed by President Woodrow Wilson -- began losing his clout in the 1930s.

    The German Bauhaus architecture movement, which abandoned neo-Classicism and introduced modernism through steel, glass and straight lines, spread throughout the country, leading to the rise of Frank Lloyd Wright and others.

    Gilbert's most famous work, the U.S. Supreme Court building, was not praised at the time. He completed the design in 1929 but died in 1934 before the building was completed the next year.

    But now Gilbert is back in fashion. In 1997, a group of architects and others formed the Cass Gilbert Society that now boasts 150 members who promote and recall his contributions.

    "I think Cass Gilbert always was a great architect, but he may have been taken for granted because he did so many important buildings," Mills said. "It was very fortunate for Essex that they got the renowned architect of the time."

    Nikita Stewart covers Essex County government. She can be reached at nstewart@starledger.com or (973) 392-1766.

    Copyright 2004 NJ.com

  4. #19
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    Jan. 02, 2006

    Investors bank on Newark rebirth

    By Janet Frankston
    Associated Press


    NEWARK, N.J. - Given that Jersey City and Hoboken have become alternatives to Manhattan as havens for the hip and trendy, some New York developers are banking on downtown Newark as the next place for upscale housing.

    The latest attempt to accelerate Newark's long-awaited renaissance is the rehabilitation of an art deco building at 1180 Raymond Blvd., blocks from Newark Penn Station and the New Jersey Performing Arts Center.

    Arthur Stern, chief executive officer of the Cogswell Realty Group, hopes to lure tenants with amenities that include valet parking, an 8,000-square-foot health club, a basketball court, and a bowling alley. The 37-story former office building will have 317 apartments.

    But whether there is a market is "the $100 million question," Stern said.

    The housing boom that has hit other North Jersey cities has bypassed Newark.

    "I don't know why it hasn't happened already," said Linda Epps, president and chief executive officer of the New Jersey Historical Society. "The revitalization effort has taken far too long."

    The state's largest city struggles with an image as a poor, crime-ridden, unsafe place, a legacy of the riots of 1967.

    Slow to recover

    "I am surprised it has taken a full generation and then some since the 1967 riots for the city to have the kind of momentum it seems it has now in its downtown corridor," said Clement Alexander Price, a professor of history at Rutgers University-Newark.

    The dense downtown and the transportation network are an urban planner's dream.

    NJ Transit and PATH funnel commuters into Newark Penn Station. A transit system expected to open in the summer would connect the Penn and Broad Street stations, the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, a riverfront stadium, and other sites. Newark Liberty International Airport is about five miles from downtown.

    The arts center opened in 1997, and a few upscale restaurants have followed. In October, Newark and the New Jersey Devils broke ground on a $310 million, 18,000-seat arena scheduled to open in 2007.

    Nevertheless, for some the perception of Newark hasn't changed. "The riots just scared everyone away from this place," said Epps, who lives and works downtown.

    $200 million push

    Mayor Sharpe James said that was changing, and Stern said, "Newark is safe, vibrant and making a comeback."

    Stern said his impression of Newark had changed since his first visit in late 1997, when he expected to be carjacked.

    His company has invested more than $200 million in the city, buying about six acres bordering Military Park for 3,000 rental units that it plans to build in the next 10 years.

    The Raymond Boulevard building, which it bought eight years ago, has been gutted and fixed up with 1,441 new windows, high-speed Internet and cable lines, and four new elevators.

    Rent will range from $1,175 per month for a 665-square-foot studio to $2,300 for a two bedroom of about 1,000 square feet.

    The first tenants are expected to move in July 1.

    One of them, Kevin Ledig, 28, will move from an apartment near the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, where his wife is a student. Ledig said living in Manhattan near his job wasn't an option.

    "The rents are ridiculous for shoe boxes," he said, adding that the commute to work was easy. "I saw a lot of potential" in Newark.

    But to convince others, developers needed to offer more than a good deal, said John McIlwain, a senior fellow for housing at the Urban Land Institute.

    Newark attracts urban professionals like Haley Peele, 25, who got to know the city as a student at the Rutgers campus.

    She pays $915 a month for a downtown second-floor walk-up studio apartment. "It's not so rough," she said. "It's kind of like a city that's trapped in the '50s, and I think that's charming."

    © 2006 Philadelphia Inquirer and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved.

    http://www.philly.com

  5. #20

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    Sorry I read part of the article from one site that said Newark, NJ and posted from the link from the full article that I didn't read. My bad!!!!
    Last edited by macmini; February 27th, 2006 at 03:18 PM.

  6. #21

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    ^^^ I think they meant Newark, California.

  7. #22

    Default Development in Newark

    Here's a few photos of the development going on in downtown Newark.

    The site of the Devil's Arena.



    Advertisement for 1180 Raymond Boulevard, which is undergoing an $80,000,000 conversion to residential and retail use.



    Worker powerwashing the grime off beautiful art deco details.



    Construction of 2 of several lightrail stops. The first is of a stop in front
    of the Verizon building on Broad St and the second one is the NJPAC stop.
    This will be the last stop and the lightrail goes underground
    further up to connect with Newark Penn Station.



  8. #23
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Actually that is the Newark Subway system. This an extension of it. The mainline goes underground quite a ways and later comes above ground deeper in Newark by Branch Brook Park and then into Bellville. Great pics by the way.

  9. #24

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    Thanks! Lightrail just has a nicer tone to it.

  10. #25

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    Here are some shots of the downtown area of Newark and surrounding areas.



    The Prudential Building



    153 Halsey Street





    County courthouse with Gutzon Borglum 's statue of Lincoln in front.







    114-116 Market Street. Most refer to it as the Jukebox building.
    Handsome building in despair.



    First Presbyterian Church 1791



    First State National Bank


    Firemen's Insurance Building


  11. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagrecco82
    That is one really good statue.

    Borglum was OK, Rushmore not a fluke.

  12. #27
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Newark has great architecture and parks, these pics put it on display beautifully and these are just a small sampling of the beautiful architecture there. With the new Arena hosting various events such as the Devils and Seton Hall BAsketball, circus, concerts etc.., NJPAC, Newark Bears Stadium, subway extension, and the refurbishing of the surrounding buildings that has already started, this will help to bring Newark back to it's former glory. It may be hard to believe for some of you New Yorkers, but the intersection of Broad and Market was BUSIER than Time Square and was the busiest intersection in the world. Had more cars and people going through there per hour than any other intersection at the world and this was through the 20s-40s. Newark was once a great alternative to NYC for a night out and the people that would perfrom in Newark were the same headliners that would be in NYC. I mean Newark once had the population in the 40s-50s of 450,000. A little less than currently in Boston, thats how popular Newark was. Than after the riots it was down hill. But Newark will be back and along with it's come back and Jersey City's already having made a strong comeback, NYC will be given a run for its money.
    Last edited by JCMAN320; March 12th, 2006 at 05:12 PM.

  13. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCMAN320
    Newark has great architecture and parks, these pics put it on display beautifully and these are just a small sampling of the beautiful architecture there. With the new Arena hosting various events such as the Devils and Seton Hall BAsketball, circus, concerts etc.., NJPAC, Newark Bears Stadium, subway extension, and the refurbishing of the surrounding buildings that has already started, this will help to bring Newark back to it's former glory. It may be hard to believe for some of you New Yorkers, but the intersection of Broad and Market was BUSIER than Time Square and was the busiest intersection in the world. Had more cars and people going through there per hour than any other intersection at the world and this was through the 20s-40s. Newark was once a great alternative to NYC for a night out and the people that would perfrom in Newark were the same headliners that would be in NYC. I mean Newark once had the population in the 40s-50s of 450,00. A little less than currently in Boston, thats how popular Newark was. Than after the riots it was down hill. But Newark will be back and along with it's come back and Jersey City's already having made a strong comeback, NYC will be given a run for its money.
    I agree, I see the changes going on in the downtown area and its amazing and Jersey City is simply a burgeoning city ready to take over. I attend New Jersey City University and Im downtown all the time. Its become a mini manhattan over there. People dont realize Wall Street is moving to Jersey City and Newark is already one of the top Insurance towns in the world. Me being born and raised in East Orange I'm very proud of what I am seeing

  14. #29

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    ^^^ I agree! Here's more pics...
    I had Newark Cops chase me away after taking some of these.
    I guess they thought I was a threat.



    Gatewat III & IV



    Gateway IV



    Newark Legal Center





    Newark Penn Station









  15. #30

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    Your pictures are great Dagrecoo, keep em coming

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