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Thread: Newark Development

  1. #8356

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    Quote Originally Posted by towerpower123 View Post
    ...Hahne's just received $40 Million in Tax Breaks. A Aeroponic Farm in the Ironbound also won $8.7 Million in tax breaks.
    http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf...ole_foods.html
    According to that article, 40% of the Hahnes project's 160 rental units are considered affordable by the EDA. That is double the usual requirement of 20% which I think is pushing it, although Rock Plaza Lofts has 20% I believe and it seems to be doing fine. However, just saw yet another suburban development get called out for having all of its affordable housing in one building - there is definitely still a public or market perception against it. I am not anti-poor in the slightest, but there is the reality that people paying top dollar for downtown rentals generally do not want to be in a building that is nearly half affordable housing. I would have no problem being proven completely wrong but that is a very high percentage.

  2. #8357
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    How hard would it be to get the South Street Station reopened?

  3. #8358

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brick City View Post
    According to that article, 40% of the Hahnes project's 160 rental units are considered affordable by the EDA. That is double the usual requirement of 20% which I think is pushing it, although Rock Plaza Lofts has 20% I believe and it seems to be doing fine. However, just saw yet another suburban development get called out for having all of its affordable housing in one building - there is definitely still a public or market perception against it. I am not anti-poor in the slightest, but there is the reality that people paying top dollar for downtown rentals generally do not want to be in a building that is nearly half affordable housing. I would have no problem being proven completely wrong but that is a very high percentage.
    Rutgers is leasing three floors in the building for artists and art studios. Would this be considered "affordable" since artists usually get housing breaks in NYC along with low-income residents?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brick City View Post
    According to that article, 40% of the Hahnes project's 160 rental units are considered affordable by the EDA. That is double the usual requirement of 20% which I think is pushing it, although Rock Plaza Lofts has 20% I believe and it seems to be doing fine. However, just saw yet another suburban development get called out for having all of its affordable housing in one building - there is definitely still a public or market perception against it. I am not anti-poor in the slightest, but there is the reality that people paying top dollar for downtown rentals generally do not want to be in a building that is nearly half affordable housing. I would have no problem being proven completely wrong but that is a very high percentage.
    We need more affordable housing for the Disabled , Elderly and Working Class ie Lower paying Govt workers , Artists , Chefs , Transportation Employees....you know the people who work the hardest and get paided the least..

  5. #8360

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    Quote Originally Posted by section08 View Post
    Rutgers is leasing three floors in the building for artists and art studios. Would this be considered "affordable" since artists usually get housing breaks in NYC along with low-income residents?
    Hmm, yeah artists could be one way they're pushing up that affordable figure. Did not realize Rutgers was taking up so much space in that building - pretty nice commitment. Also fits with their now outdated master plan which called for campus related development at the site where Prudential is now building its new tower.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
    We need more affordable housing for the Disabled , Elderly and Working Class ie Lower paying Govt workers , Artists , Chefs , Transportation Employees....you know the people who work the hardest and get paided the least..
    Again, as I stated above and my posting history should suggest, I'm not against the lower income crowd (I'm not too far from that bracket myself). There used to be a time in this country when the rich and poor lived very close to each other in the same neighborhoods. Think it's safe to say those days are long gone. If this project demonstrates that a 60/40 ratio is feasible I'm all for it. Let's not ignore though that there is a market bias against places with "affordable housing," Section 8 welcome," and so on.

  6. #8361

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    What income do they stipulate for getting into affordable units? There are plenty of people out there with college degrees that can't really afford decent apartments on entry-level salaries in North Jersey.

  7. #8362

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
    How hard would it be to get the South Street Station reopened?
    If that PATH extension to the airport goes through, it would be nearly impossible. New York bound side would be easy. There is plenty of room. The outbound side would be far harder as the two PATH tracks would have to go right through the remains of the platforms. Take note of where the current storage tracks end. Short of a significant structure over McCarter Boulevard to support the PATH extension, it would be impossible to do the extension since both PATH tracks are on that side. Without the rather unpopular extension, it would be as simple as renovating the existing side platforms and building an elevator on the outbound side and ADA ramps on the New York bound side. The cost could range from $20-40 Million for that to close to $100 Million if the platforms have to be rebuilt and significant track work has to occur. There is plenty of potential in terms of new commuters if that were to actually happen.

    Another critically needed station would be a Weequahic Park station where Meeker Avenue crosses under the Raritan Valley Line. That nearby cluster of towers on Elizabeth Avenue is in desperate need of Rail-based transit access. That would be a cheaper side platform station since it is somewhat less constrained.

    Unfortunately, NJ Transit's budget will be strained to maximum capacity with the need to replace the tunnels under the Hudson and several other projects like the North Brunswick infill station and the Lackawanna Cut-off restoration, and the Camden-Glassboro Light Rail. With little to no support from our governor for any transit project, particularly in Newark, and a Transportation Trust Fund that will go completely dry in a few short years, consideration on either station will likely be pushed off until a Pro-transit politician reaches the Governor's office.

    Now for a Newark update from a few hours ago.
    The following images are on my blog, http://urbanismvsmodernism.blogspot....l?view=sidebar

    Prudential












    The first of hopefully many stores has opened in that Rutgers parking garage on Halsey Street.


    These architectural plans could mean a second one very soon in the next bay. Another on the other side, seen above, could be coming sooner.


    On the other side of Warren Street, the extended building's storefront is being renovated, and appeared to have exposed brick walls.


    I hope that they are renovating that boarded up area...


    The mysterious renovations of the PSEG plaza are continuing, and will have at least two corridors of streetlights going toward the building and will likely have a grassy area akin to a green roof above the underground parking deck.








    The advertisement billboard on Washington Street by the Rutgers Law School building was recently changed to advertise the Ironbound. It must be a generic advertisement because it promotes the proximity of the Ironbound to Newark Airport, New York City, and the Meadowlands Sports Complex (Ignoring NJPAC and the Prudential Center!) even though the sign is closer to the Ironbound than all of those places listed on the sign, and NYC and the Meadowlands are not in Newark, and thus do not benefit Newark at all. Why don't they say that it is steps away from Newark Penn Station and ample parking near it, rather than advertising locations completely outside of the Ironbound? The ones paying for the sign are the Go Ironbound! promotional agency.


    Last edited by towerpower123; December 15th, 2014 at 06:59 PM.

  8. #8363

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Elliott View Post
    What income do they stipulate for getting into affordable units? There are plenty of people out there with college degrees that can't really afford decent apartments on entry-level salaries in North Jersey.
    Most new developments have tiers for affordable housing ranging from very low income to moderate income. The income limits are based on the regional medium income. Newark is part of the Essex, Union, Morris and Warren county region where the medium household income ranges from $63,000 to $119,000 depending on the size of the household. Moderate income is for any household making anywhere from 50% to 80% of the region's medium household income, so a household making $95K can technically qualify for an affordable apartment if the development offers apartments in the moderate income tier and has a large enough unit as the $95K is for an 8 person household. A single person making $95k obviously over-qualifies but if he/she makes $50K, they do qualify. Low income is 50% or less and very low income is 30% or less.

    As I work in property management I can speak to Brick City's point: I've encountered situations where a small number of tenants complain about affordable apartments in their "luxury" community but that's because they're ignorant. For the most part, not too many people pay it any mind nor can they tell the difference between someone who is in a market rent apartment or an affordable apartment - at least not in a well managed building. Tenants in affordable apartments are still screened so in many cases, the same criteria applies - no criminal background, no landlord/tenant filings, decent credit, a certain rent/income ratio and the same occupancy standards apply. And not for nothing, that application process is so tedious and the waitlists for a nice apartment are often so long, those tenants won't jeopardize losing that unit so many of them are model tenants.

    TRA and Section 8 are different animals entirely. People who get rental assistance still pay market rent for their apartment, but most or all of the rent is covered by the government. They tend to be more problematic.
    Last edited by scrollhectic; December 15th, 2014 at 07:44 PM.

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    Any news on the Shaq or NJPac towers? I thought NJPac had a high likelihood of breaking ground in the autumn...although here we are about 15 months after the Shaq "groundbreaking" with no signs of ground having actually been broken on that project...keeping my fingers crossed though for NJPac (which to me looks alot better architecturally than the Shaq tower).

  10. #8365
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    I spoke to some investors about the PAC in the summer , sometime early or mid next year. The Shaq tower seems like Political switch-a-roo...

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    Quote Originally Posted by towerpower123 View Post
    If that PATH extension to the airport goes through, it would be nearly impossible. New York bound side would be easy. There is plenty of room. The outbound side would be far harder as the two PATH tracks would have to go right through the remains of the platforms. Take note of where the current storage tracks end. Short of a significant structure over McCarter Boulevard to support the PATH extension, it would be impossible to do the extension since both PATH tracks are on that side. Without the rather unpopular extension, it would be as simple as renovating the existing side platforms and building an elevator on the outbound side and ADA ramps on the New York bound side. The cost could range from $20-40 Million for that to close to $100 Million if the platforms have to be rebuilt and significant track work has to occur. There is plenty of potential in terms of new commuters if that were to actually happen.

    Another critically needed station would be a Weequahic Park station where Meeker Avenue crosses under the Raritan Valley Line. That nearby cluster of towers on Elizabeth Avenue is in desperate need of Rail-based transit access. That would be a cheaper side platform station since it is somewhat less constrained.

    Unfortunately, NJ Transit's budget will be strained to maximum capacity with the need to replace the tunnels under the Hudson and several other projects like the North Brunswick infill station and the Lackawanna Cut-off restoration, and the Camden-Glassboro Light Rail. With little to no support from our governor for any transit project, particularly in Newark, and a Transportation Trust Fund that will go completely dry in a few short years, consideration on either station will likely be pushed off until a Pro-transit politician reaches the Governor's office.
    Both could be built , a station for NJT would be the easiest with just 2 side Platforms , 2 Elevators and Stairs. The PATH could swing across Route 21 and build a Station on the Strip Mall...both stations I can see getting a heavy amount of usage from Industrial , Airport and Transportation workers along with regular commuters... The Weehquahic Station would also get heavy usage along with a station in Hillside which could replace a local bus line... I would also restore the Roseville Station & Orange Street on the Morristown line which would be serviced by Summit Local trains running every 15mins between Hoboken & Summit. South Street , South Elizabeth (Park Ave South) would be serviced by a train every 15min running between Hoboken & South Amboy which takes care of the most heavily used section of the NEC. The TOD opportunities at these stations is endless.. I would also do the extension of the Newark LRT to Wataseeing Avenue and form a Transportation hub....probably only cost 100 million since the ROW is already there.

    If New Jersey Transit would stop spending on wasteful items like more double deckers when it has abandoned a good fleet of Arrows then it would have money for these projects. The ALP45DP are mainly used on the Diesel only lines , there the biggest wasteful purchase by NJT. Then there's the wasteful infill stations like Mount Arlington , the rebuilding of the station at Anderson Street , overspending on Ridgewood's rebuilding and the underused Ramsey Route 17 Projects which make angry that there spending money on a developer driven station like Wesmont or North Brunswick or South Bordentown...those developers can fork over there own money if they want a station so badly. The Glassboro line is turning into a mess , there's no way that project should be costing a billion..and not go all the way to Millville and Bridgeton... The Lackawanna cut off as much as I would love to see it become reality after the opening and failure of Mount Arlington i'm not sure its worth it... If the Feds want to restore it for Amtrak then I'm all for it , otherwise its a waste. Projects like MOM Network and various Urban Infill Projects should override this Project.

    Part of the problem is Christie , but the leadership at NJT , PATH , PATCO and Turnpike seem to have lost there visionary way...its all about pandering to the rich and bypassing the middle class and poor communities.

  12. #8367

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
    Both could be built , a station for NJT would be the easiest with just 2 side Platforms , 2 Elevators and Stairs. The PATH could swing across Route 21 and build a Station on the Strip Mall...both stations I can see getting a heavy amount of usage from Industrial , Airport and Transportation workers along with regular commuters... The Weehquahic Station would also get heavy usage along with a station in Hillside which could replace a local bus line... I would also restore the Roseville Station & Orange Street on the Morristown line which would be serviced by Summit Local trains running every 15mins between Hoboken & Summit. South Street , South Elizabeth (Park Ave South) would be serviced by a train every 15min running between Hoboken & South Amboy which takes care of the most heavily used section of the NEC. The TOD opportunities at these stations is endless.. I would also do the extension of the Newark LRT to Wataseeing Avenue and form a Transportation hub....probably only cost 100 million since the ROW is already there.

    If New Jersey Transit would stop spending on wasteful items like more double deckers when it has abandoned a good fleet of Arrows then it would have money for these projects. The ALP45DP are mainly used on the Diesel only lines , there the biggest wasteful purchase by NJT. Then there's the wasteful infill stations like Mount Arlington , the rebuilding of the station at Anderson Street , overspending on Ridgewood's rebuilding and the underused Ramsey Route 17 Projects which make angry that there spending money on a developer driven station like Wesmont or North Brunswick or South Bordentown...those developers can fork over there own money if they want a station so badly. The Glassboro line is turning into a mess , there's no way that project should be costing a billion..and not go all the way to Millville and Bridgeton... The Lackawanna cut off as much as I would love to see it become reality after the opening and failure of Mount Arlington i'm not sure its worth it... If the Feds want to restore it for Amtrak then I'm all for it , otherwise its a waste. Projects like MOM Network and various Urban Infill Projects should override this Project.

    Part of the problem is Christie , but the leadership at NJT , PATH , PATCO and Turnpike seem to have lost there visionary way...its all about pandering to the rich and bypassing the middle class and poor communities.
    If they will build over Rt 21, then the PATH and the South Street Station could work together. Unfortunately, I highly doubt that the two separate agencies will work anything out to get the PA to spend more money. Also, the current plan is to just extend directly to the airport, with no infill station, which would make the project rather pointless. Since the airport is already served well by both Amtrak and several NJ Transit lines, and the PATH extension would go to the exact same monorail station (The only one which charges $5.50 to use) and could potentially remove one seat change for Jersey City and World Trade Center travelers. Hoboken travelers would not benefit as PATH is far slower than direct NJ Transit access, and Midtown Manhattan commuters would continue to use Penn Station for direct one seat trips to the monorail station, as PATH is slower and would still be slower even with direct Newark (Airport)-33rd Street service, although I do believe that they are waiting until the mess at Harrison Station is completed before they bring that back. You can only run so many trains when they keep having to run on one reversible track only.

    How serious are those plans to reopen the line paralleling Rt.21 to Belleville? The entire right of way is still in existance from 3rd Avenue North, and apparantly still in use with a single freight line, but it appears there is room for a second. A small section is missing between 3rd Avenue and the Harrison side of the bridge to Harrison. It then parallels I-280 along an existing and in use freight line and connects with the line from Newark Broad Street Station. I remember someone mentioning a massive TOD development in Belleville on the former industrial lands near Washington Avenue and Graylock Avenue. The line parallels a surface street, so it could be interesting to see if it happens. If anything, it would work best with diesel-multiple units at high frequency or if electrified, some electric multiple units like those that serve a huge number of small German cities and towns, since they are quieter than typical Heavy-Rail trains. Multi-modal multiple units would be most ideal if they don't electrify it, which would be a mistake. If that line goes forward, it could have excellent effects on North Newark and Belleville.

    I think that NJT is moving in the right direction with the double deckers and the ALP45DP's, since they can both use the tunnels to midtown without having to transfer at Newark or Frank Lautenburg station. The double deckers significantly increase the capacity of the existing routes to get more people in the limited train slots in those tunnels. The ALP45DP's are great because they can use both the non-electrified suburban routes and the non-diesel tunnel, granted that there are some better and more modern options. I only wish SEPTA could buy a bunch of them and reopen their closed lines...

    The MOM line would be an incredible investment as close to a half million Monmouth and Ocean county residents are too far away from the North Jersey Coast line to use it. Their only option is driving along Route 9, which is completely crowded from at least 7 am to around 8 pm, with no midday break, or the few buses that are just as stuck in traffic. There is literally no other highway to go North from that region as all of the others follow the coast and the Parkway is too far east and the Turnpike is too far west. Currently, less than 5% of the commuters in that entire region use mass transit to get to work. While some Rush Hour bus lanes on the shoulder of Rt 9 north of 18 have somewhat eased that commute, everyone south of 18 would rather widen Rt 9 for more cars than ever do the same for buses, and we all know that does absolutely nothing. In fact, the busiest sections of Rt 9 seem to be the widest ones where it is up to 4 lanes in each direction near certain clusters of strip-malls on steroids. If that MOM line goes through, it could potentially make hundreds of thousands of suburban commuters more likely to take the train to NYC and even Newark as they would very much prefer to ride a train than cuss at every other driver that cuts them off everyday. Unfortunately, that project is tied to the tunnels to Midtown, which will likely not happen for at least 15 years without a major focus by politicians. When ARC was cancelled, the MOM line went with it, as the North Jersey Coast line is already too busy during rush hour, even with the double deckers.

    In terms of the other infill stations, you need a significant population density within walk distance to achieve a high ridership for a new station. Otherwise, 1 Park and Ride spot means one daily commuter, as about 90% of US commuters that drive will drive alone.

    In terms of getting developers to build their own stations, I don't think they know how. The requirements to build a station in terms of maintanence and post-9/11 security demands are so strict that anything they propose would be immediately cancelled. Unless the transit agencies can trust anyone else to design the stations and deal with the contract-process/anti-corruption-bidding-process requirements, they will continue building their own stations on their own limited budget. The only way to do it otherwise would be to charge the developers the cost of a station without them buying bonds. The only system we have are those Public-Private partnerships which so many hate because they fear the possible monopoly in terms of rail fares or highway tolls. Only the success of the M-1 Streetcar line in Detroit, which is being built with private funds, will tell whether privately funded rail transit projects every could happen.

    All of these projects continue to hinge on the state's Transportation Trust Fund, whose income will soon drop below the payments on its bonds in a few short years, which nobody wants to do absolutely anything about. That funding is needed to continue maintaining and expanding the transit networks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by towerpower123 View Post
    If they will build over Rt 21, then the PATH and the South Street Station could work together. Unfortunately, I highly doubt that the two separate agencies will work anything out to get the PA to spend more money. Also, the current plan is to just extend directly to the airport, with no infill station, which would make the project rather pointless. Since the airport is already served well by both Amtrak and several NJ Transit lines, and the PATH extension would go to the exact same monorail station (The only one which charges $5.50 to use) and could potentially remove one seat change for Jersey City and World Trade Center travelers. Hoboken travelers would not benefit as PATH is far slower than direct NJ Transit access, and Midtown Manhattan commuters would continue to use Penn Station for direct one seat trips to the monorail station, as PATH is slower and would still be slower even with direct Newark (Airport)-33rd Street service, although I do believe that they are waiting until the mess at Harrison Station is completed before they bring that back. You can only run so many trains when they keep having to run on one reversible track only.

    How serious are those plans to reopen the line paralleling Rt.21 to Belleville? The entire right of way is still in existance from 3rd Avenue North, and apparantly still in use with a single freight line, but it appears there is room for a second. A small section is missing between 3rd Avenue and the Harrison side of the bridge to Harrison. It then parallels I-280 along an existing and in use freight line and connects with the line from Newark Broad Street Station. I remember someone mentioning a massive TOD development in Belleville on the former industrial lands near Washington Avenue and Graylock Avenue. The line parallels a surface street, so it could be interesting to see if it happens. If anything, it would work best with diesel-multiple units at high frequency or if electrified, some electric multiple units like those that serve a huge number of small German cities and towns, since they are quieter than typical Heavy-Rail trains. Multi-modal multiple units would be most ideal if they don't electrify it, which would be a mistake. If that line goes forward, it could have excellent effects on North Newark and Belleville.

    I think that NJT is moving in the right direction with the double deckers and the ALP45DP's, since they can both use the tunnels to midtown without having to transfer at Newark or Frank Lautenburg station. The double deckers significantly increase the capacity of the existing routes to get more people in the limited train slots in those tunnels. The ALP45DP's are great because they can use both the non-electrified suburban routes and the non-diesel tunnel, granted that there are some better and more modern options. I only wish SEPTA could buy a bunch of them and reopen their closed lines...

    The MOM line would be an incredible investment as close to a half million Monmouth and Ocean county residents are too far away from the North Jersey Coast line to use it. Their only option is driving along Route 9, which is completely crowded from at least 7 am to around 8 pm, with no midday break, or the few buses that are just as stuck in traffic. There is literally no other highway to go North from that region as all of the others follow the coast and the Parkway is too far east and the Turnpike is too far west. Currently, less than 5% of the commuters in that entire region use mass transit to get to work. While some Rush Hour bus lanes on the shoulder of Rt 9 north of 18 have somewhat eased that commute, everyone south of 18 would rather widen Rt 9 for more cars than ever do the same for buses, and we all know that does absolutely nothing. In fact, the busiest sections of Rt 9 seem to be the widest ones where it is up to 4 lanes in each direction near certain clusters of strip-malls on steroids. If that MOM line goes through, it could potentially make hundreds of thousands of suburban commuters more likely to take the train to NYC and even Newark as they would very much prefer to ride a train than cuss at every other driver that cuts them off everyday. Unfortunately, that project is tied to the tunnels to Midtown, which will likely not happen for at least 15 years without a major focus by politicians. When ARC was cancelled, the MOM line went with it, as the North Jersey Coast line is already too busy during rush hour, even with the double deckers.

    In terms of the other infill stations, you need a significant population density within walk distance to achieve a high ridership for a new station. Otherwise, 1 Park and Ride spot means one daily commuter, as about 90% of US commuters that drive will drive alone.

    In terms of getting developers to build their own stations, I don't think they know how. The requirements to build a station in terms of maintanence and post-9/11 security demands are so strict that anything they propose would be immediately cancelled. Unless the transit agencies can trust anyone else to design the stations and deal with the contract-process/anti-corruption-bidding-process requirements, they will continue building their own stations on their own limited budget. The only way to do it otherwise would be to charge the developers the cost of a station without them buying bonds. The only system we have are those Public-Private partnerships which so many hate because they fear the possible monopoly in terms of rail fares or highway tolls. Only the success of the M-1 Streetcar line in Detroit, which is being built with private funds, will tell whether privately funded rail transit projects every could happen.

    All of these projects continue to hinge on the state's Transportation Trust Fund, whose income will soon drop below the payments on its bonds in a few short years, which nobody wants to do absolutely anything about. That funding is needed to continue maintaining and expanding the transit networks.
    The Reason for having 2 stations is that one is primarily for New York Commuters which is the PATH and the other for People coming from the Suburbs and working in the South Ironbound or Port which could be connected with a bus shuttle service. People in the South Ironbound and Lincoln Park area would be to access other cities and the Gateway region of NJ which further reduces the strain on the roadways... Then you could upzone the area around the stations and encourage ultra-dense redevelopment.

    The Plans for both the Kingsland Branch and Newark-Paterson LRT keeping coming back....there are a few developers in Kearny and Belleville who have expressed interest in a rail service to NYC and Newark. Both lines would require just a basic rebuilding , double tracking , track replacement , and stations. Nothing to expensive like a Bridge or Tunnel replacement like what is needed for the Lackawanna Cut-off and Lower Boonton lines. I would rather see the line be turned into a LRT then a Regional Rail line. The short distances between stations and the Heavy usage of the line would point to LRT. The areas where it would street run would be similar to Essex Street on the HBLR or Downtown Camden on the RiverLine.

    The Double Deckers are good for long distance journeys but for the denser Electrfied territory of NJT they seem to do more harm then good. The Dwell time is longer , and the added fact that most stations are low level doesn't help. During rush hr at Newark Penn , Secaucus , New York and Newark Broad the Double Deckers seem cause long lines and add upwards of 5 mins to some stations... While Single levels don't seem to suffer from the this problem as much... Theres also the issue of overhead space , the Double deckers don't have any while Single levels do. Thus any train that stops at the Airport seems to have overcrowding issues even offpeak and weekends...not enough room for the luggage and bags so they often take up seat space. The ALP45DPs are wasteful due to the fact that NJT isn't using them correctly... They can merge the Coast line schedule and run through trains but they don't...same with the Raitian Valley , taking up some extra slots offpeak.. NJT either uses the DP's for Electric or Diesel service for the most part and with the Tunnel 10 years away the purchase was a huge waste. NJT should have bought M8 Style EMUs for the Capacity upgrades and DMU's for the Diesel services... SEPTA likes Electric trains and does well with them....they tend to be cheaper to operate aswell compared to Diesels and Dual units...

    If New Jersey Transit were to expand Kearny JCT it could build the MOM Network and the rest of its plans without any issues... The Second Flyover at Kearny JCT will only cost a hundred million or so... NJT is obsessed with NYC , to the point of neglecting the growing Gold Coast... Hoboken Terminal is underused and could easily handle and addition 12 lines feeding into it... NJT should be running more service to Hoboken...giving ppl the option of switching to NYC...or access to the Gold Coast. A lot of the MOM region works in the Gold Coast , Newark and Lower Manhattan...and not Midtown Manhattan... South of Matawan the Coast line isn't all that busy...the line itself only carries 20,000. Although the MOM is expected to carry as much as 120,000...

    Which is why I think the Cut-off unless done by Amtrak in an Intercity Format is a waste...its mainly a park and ride project...not servicing any large commuter shed...

    Come on now , how ridiculous does that statement sound. Developers don't know how to build a station , yet they can build a dense housing redevelopment or a shopping mall or convention center.. Developers have pitched in the past for Infill stations out West and towns and counties have aswell.. A lot of Developers integrate there projects in with the local rail line so there aware at least on some level what needs to be done. Post 9/11 hasn't changed much in station design except with adding Security Cameras... The ADA requirements have more effect on station design , requiring elevators , ramps , parking lot design...

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