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Thread: Newark Development

  1. #8431
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    Nice Photos Nagle , and some Interesting info on Starbucks. I wonder what that means for Four Corners. On Side note I will not being doing any large scale Photo overviews till the Cherry Blossom Festival in April....

  2. #8432

    Default Slow steps forward....painfully slow

    Passive recreation or retail center: Developers, council struggle over Newark's Triangle Park project



    Pictured is a rendering of Triangle Park produce by Boraie Development LLC, the proposed developer for the project. (Handout)

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    By Naomi Nix | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
    Email the author | Follow on Twitter
    on February 04, 2015 at 3:33 PM, updated February 04, 2015 at 3:34 PM




    NEWARK — After years in the making, Triangle Park may become a reality.

    Newark's city council voted today on two pieces of legislation which pave the way for Triangle Park to be completed after years of stagnation.

    The council voted today to transfer city land to the Newark Housing Authority for the creation of a park in the shape of the triangle in the blocks of Edison Place, Lafayette Street, McCarter Highway and Mulberry Street.

    The council also agreed to take a second vote and hold a public hearing on an ordinance that amends the redevelopment plan for that area to include retail opportunities for a second vote and public hearing.

    Both measures passed with five yes votes. East Ward Councilman Augusto Amador voted against the measures, and North Ward Councilman Anibal Ramos abstained. Councilmen Carlos Gonzalez and Luis Quintana were not present for the vote.

    The council's votes arrive after considerable behind-the-scenes debate among council members and developers about which company city authorities should choose to produce the project. Council members debated between two options at today's meeting — Boraie and Edison.

    Boraie Development LLC, the developer who produced the CityPlex12 on Springfield, has the backing of Newark Mayor Ras Baraka's administration and City Council President Mildred Crump.

    Boraie says it plans to build a park with several retail opportunities. Possibilities include a theater, a skating rink, and stores, according to Boraie spokesman Timothy White. Under Boraie's plan, the developer would hold a longterm lease for the land. White said the company has promised to have financing available.

    But Edison, which owns several nearby parking lots and other land, has criticized that proposal. Primarily, the company says it envisions a "passive park" with little retail. Shopping might discourage major companies from relocating to the city or investors from building more residential opportunities, company representatives argued.


    "This is the most important redevelopment place in city," Edison consultant Tom Banker said in an interview. "This is the place you could attract really really high end uses."

    Edison also says that when the project was first conceived during the planning of the Prudential Center several years ago, it was supposed to be the main developer for the park.

    Instead, the company says Boraie was able to negotiate a deal with the Newark Housing Authority to be the main developer for the site. The Newark Housing Authority did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

    Additionally, Edison says it will put away 5 million in an escrow account within the month for the project and chip in financing for another long-held plan of the city: building a pedestrian bridge between Newark Penn Station and the Ironbound.

    The final vote on the renegotiated development plan will be subject to a second vote by the city council at a later date.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    taken from nj.com

    http://www.nj.com/essex/index.ssf/2015/02/council_greenlights_triangle_park_project.html#inc art_river
    Last edited by 66nexus; February 4th, 2015 at 05:30 PM.

  3. #8433

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    ^Man please, at this point I don't want to hear anything Edison has to say. They have the awesome track record of ZERO. Granted, we haven't seen much from Boraie, but the point is we did see SOMETHING. What exactly has Edison done during the time the Pru has been open? And how in the world would more shopping discourage residential/commercial development.

    ----------------------

    Quote Originally Posted by towerpower123 View Post
    That is beyond fantastic!!!! It is so much better than the possible 4 story disappointment we were beginning to expect. I love the fact that it has retail stores along the entire ground floor facade because the area across the street is an unbroken row of abandoned and boarded up buildings. There are at least 20 of them along that street. Hopefully this will kick off a renovation of them!
    Quote Originally Posted by newarkdevil1 View Post
    This really builds out the southern halsey corridor but everything is going to come down to connecting all that has happened at Edison and Lafayette with this to connect these developments.

    That's unfortunately the sad thing about the piecemeal development. Newark has to better connect its newly developed zones so they don't seem like islands. The retail strip is a nice street anchor, but I agree with you both on the fact that a) further development needs to occur further down the strip, and b) it all needs to be connected.
    Last edited by 66nexus; February 4th, 2015 at 05:42 PM.

  4. #8434

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    I can't imagine why anyone would advocate for passive anything in that spot. Triangle park would be at the heart of the the state's biggest city, it should be bustling, I love the idea of a theater. Honestly, I wish someone in power had the vision to at least include the possibility of using that vacant land to expand the light rail south or west.

  5. #8435

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    Edison can let another developer develop that lot. They have so many other lots in GREAT locations that they can develop but have done nothing with them. My suggestion to Edison is that they PARTNER with a developer and arrange some sort of lease back deal where the developer develops the lot (residential or commercial) complete with parking and Edison can manage the parking component. They can attract developers by offering cheap land in high traffic, downtown locations. Edison can retain an ownership percentage in the new development all while putting nothing in to develop the lot. They have everything to gain from that arrangement.
    Last edited by scrollhectic; February 4th, 2015 at 08:07 PM.

  6. #8436
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    Edison needs to be driven out of the city of Newark. They contribute nothing.

  7. #8437
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    I'd like to know if Boraie ever plans on actually starting construction on One Rector Street, since they broke ground on that project a year and a half ago.

  8. #8438
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrollhectic View Post
    Edison can let another developer develop that lot. They have so many other lots in GREAT locations that they can develop but have done nothing with them.
    It would've been better if Edison had done "nothing" with their lots. They've done worse than "nothing": they've demolished historic buildings in Newark's official historic districts--and without the requisite permits!

    Edison is the lowest of the low. They're a plague on Newark, destroying Newark's history and turning it into a huge parking lot for the suburbanites.

  9. #8439

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    The city approved the new zoning ordinance, which was 5 years in the making and the first time the zoning has been significantly changed since 1957. That was the final vote, so almost everything is now enforced.

    There are now 19 instead of twelve zoning districts.
    The standards for the Bayonne box are now law, rather than a suggestion. This includes minimizing the front setback and requiring a minimum amount usable windows. Most of those rules apply to ALL buildings. This includes significant limits on those hated security gates, which now have to be 90% clear.
    New parking lots now require a landscaped buffer, rather than a chain link fence.
    Parking requirements have been adjusted to be specific to the actual use, rather than the 1950's car-centric level set for all spaces based on floor area. Less frequently visited establishments require far less parking.
    The parking requirement is eliminated for certain small infill cases. This means that a 3 story building with ground floor retail can be built using existing streetfront and nearby parking, rather than requiring a variance and a fight over parking woes every time.
    In certain areas near train and light rail stations, and along the Springfield Ave BRT corridor, parking is decreased to as low as 1/2 space per bedroom for residential buildings, encouraging transit oriented development.
    Ugly billboards and oversized signage are now banned with few exceptions.

    These rules will benefit good development all across the city, particularly saving small developers from lengthy battles for variances. The result will mean a lot of infill development and some more larger projects in the near future!
    http://glocallynewark.com/newark-cit...g-master-plan/

  10. #8440

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Elliott View Post
    I can't imagine why anyone would advocate for passive anything in that spot. Triangle park would be at the heart of the the state's biggest city, it should be bustling, I love the idea of a theater. Honestly, I wish someone in power had the vision to at least include the possibility of using that vacant land to expand the light rail south or west.

    Quote Originally Posted by scrollhectic View Post
    Edison can let another developer develop that lot. They have so many other lots in GREAT locations that they can develop but have done nothing with them. My suggestion to Edison is that they PARTNER with a developer and arrange some sort of lease back deal where the developer develops the lot (residential or commercial) complete with parking and Edison can manage the parking component. They can attract developers by offering cheap land in high traffic, downtown locations. Edison can retain an ownership percentage in the new development all while putting nothing in to develop the lot. They have everything to gain from that arrangement.
    That's actually not a bad idea.

    As far as Edison wanting a passive park, the problem with them is that they're perfectly okay with the status quo. They make plenty of money with those lots and they probably see any development on them as a hit to their wallet. They most likely see any active retail in the area as a possible point of growth (which is a threat).

    Quote Originally Posted by arcman210 View Post
    Edison needs to be driven out of the city of Newark. They contribute nothing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hamilton View Post
    It would've been better if Edison had done "nothing" with their lots. They've done worse than "nothing": they've demolished historic buildings in Newark's official historic districts--and without the requisite permits!

    Edison is the lowest of the low. They're a plague on Newark, destroying Newark's history and turning it into a huge parking lot for the suburbanites.

    I'm surprised Edison even has the stones to comment on the development. But like I saying above I think they're only opening their mouth because active development in the area justifies more development and that threatens their surface lot cash cows.


    Quote Originally Posted by West Hudson View Post
    I'd like to know if Boraie ever plans on actually starting construction on One Rector Street, since they broke ground on that project a year and a half ago.
    Here's hoping this Triangle Park planned development doesn't go the same way.

  11. #8441
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    So with the changes to the zoning code , do you think redevelopment will speed up?

  12. #8442

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
    So with the changes to the zoning code , do you think redevelopment will speed up?
    Without a doubt!!! Newark has a reputation of being extremely unfriendly to development because everybody wants it to benefit their ward and neighborhood, otherwise it is horrible in their opinion. That goes for literally every single thing built. While the various development plans and master plans generated new rules to create better development with large clear windows, minimal sideyard setbacks, and hidden parking, the city was still going by the horribly out-dated 1950's zoning. This meant that you had to get a variance for any changes that are not specifically permitted by the old zoning and that usually meant that you had to make your case to the full review board and all of the "What will it do to help me?"-type citizens. This meant lengthy and costly delays and a huge amount of uncertainty about whether or not your project would EVER get approved. While it was less of a problem for large-scale developers, who could afford lawyers, community advocates, and a huge PR team, the smaller developers doing the crucial infill buildings had a far tougher time. This meant that what actually did happen has resulted in the piecemeal downtown development with very few infill projects elsewhere. As an example of the results of that, the Bayonne boxes are the result of development following the codes and escaping any serious nitpicking from the planning and zoning boards, since they maximize the usage of the site within the 1950's suburban ideal of front and side yard setbacks.

    The new zoning will not only streamline new development, it will also result in better development. Front and side yard setbacks are all but eliminated and even banned in most shopping districts to create a better uniform streetscape and there is also a requirement for a minimum percentage of clear usable window area, set at 65% for ground floor storefronts and 50% for upper floors across almost all residential and commercial zones. REAR ENTRANCES ARE ALMOST UNIVERSALLY BANNED! That should deal with the problem of bricking in windows and frosting or otherwise obscuring windows, with the end goal of reducing crime with the tool of "eyes on the street." If a developer is going to use those hated roll-down safety gates, they have to be 90% transparent, so now more walls of solid metal for any new gates, new construction or renovation! In most shopping districts, there is a minimum height of 3 or more floors to ensure that stand alone big box stores and single-story retail buildings don't occupy the sites of mixed use development. Effectively, that damn Walgreens on Ferry Street in the north end of the Ironbound can never happen again without a lot of variances and a lengthy review.

    Finally, with parking requirements now adjusted to fit the actual use rather than a one-size-fits-all regulation, one of the worst and most expensive obstructions to dense urban development in Newark has been reduced or even eliminated for small infill conditions, like all of those along Ferry Street. That can now happen all along other streets like Springfield, Central, Bloomfield, MLK, Washington, Bergen, an Orange Avenues and Streets.

    We should start to see a burst of wall to wall mixed-use infill development citywide as developers and architects begin using the new codes, with more projects being approved and quicker. Also, I believe that parking can no longer be the sole use of a site without a street-facing retail frontage and that retail must cover a majority of the ground floor frontage. Only time will tell if the desired results will be properly achieved and how much development will actually occur, but we could be seeing the results in a few months.

    If you would like to read the zoning ordinance, the current one can be read through the link below. It is very easy to read and very diagrammatic to make it clear what is permitted and what isn't, and explain the "Form Based Zoning" principles that have finally taken effect.
    http://planningcopy.wpengine.com/wp-...LURscreen1.pdf

    There is an interactive zoning map as well so scroll around and see what could be developed where. The red areas are generally streetfront commercial areas and the darker oranges and light browns are denser residential areas.
    http://planningcopy.wpengine.com/zoning-map/


    In other news, the city will be selling city-owned properties to couple for $1000 on Valentines Day. $500 due up front and $500 plus any closing cost due at closing. Also, the buyer must submit an approved project to be built on the site and completed within 18 months after closing and live there for 5 years. It is part of a "Live Newark" promotion and will hopefully fill in a lot of empty sites if it is successful. It is open to ALL couples.
    http://www.theroot.com/articles/news...lentine_s.html
    Last edited by towerpower123; February 9th, 2015 at 10:09 PM.

  13. #8443

    Default A little insight on the latest regarding Triangle Park (long)

    Triangle Park (Newark’s newest proposed park in Downtown) inches forward

    BY LYANNE


    For Over 10 years, Triangle Park, a new park located next to the Prudential center, was envisioned as the lush capstone on a plan to rebuild Newark’s once desolate downtown core. The final stage in a project under way for a decade, the park would provide a pedestrian link between Newark’s Ironbound, Penn Station and the Prudential Center arena. Moreover, it would be the centerpiece for new retail, housing and office space that would boost the city’s struggling tax base.

    But after ten years, and close to $12 million spent, today Triangle Park remains a parking lot, encircling a long abandoned factory in the heart of the state’s largest city.
    No plans have been completed. No statues, benches, fountains or sculptures have been commissioned. No official plans exist to refurbish the abandoned factory that sits in the park’s footprint.

    The group responsible for the park’s development was the Newark Downtown Core Redevelopment Corporation (NDCRC), and on Wednesday Councilmen of the Eastward Augusto Amador, discussed his frustration with the process, which ultimately resulted in him resigning and the redevelopment corporation, that quietly disbanded in April of 2011. The Newark Housing Authority has now taken control of the project, but not before the group spent millions on salaries and well-connected consultants, according to a Star-Ledger review of corporation records.

    After Booker’s election as mayor, the NDCRC, along with the Newark Housing Authority, was tasked to create parks, develop a hotel, and redesign downtown city streets. As CEO of NDCRC, Crawley commanded a salary of close to $165,000 to oversee a multimillion-dollar budget.

    A third project, to turn a blighted parking lot next to the Prudential Center into Triangle Park, never happened, although around $12 million was spent, mostly on land purchases, Crawley told the New Jersey Star-Ledger in 2011. ”We shouldn’t just build a park without considering the possibility of creating wealth opportunities for Newarkers,” he said. “It was about growing the city, and to that end we decided to do a market feasibility of the park.” But Keith Kinard, director of the Newark Housing Authority, who had called for NDCRC’s dissolution, told the paper “It’s clear the land’s not cheap, but the organization appeared to be top-heavy especially in light of the work that remained … and the lack of really any timetable for park completion.”



    Out of the $19 million bonded by the city to fund park construction, $9.4 million went to land acquisition for the 1.7-acre parcel, roughly the total size needed for the park, Crawley said. Close to $3 million has been spent on salaries, contracts and related fees since the group’s inception in late 2005, according to records — the bulk of that money expended in 2010.

    “It’s clear the land’s not cheap, but the organization appeared to be top-heavy especially in light of the work that remained … and the lack of really any timetable for park completion,” said housing authority director Keith Kinard who was one of several city leaders seeking the dissolution of NDCRC. “I think that their intentions were in the right place, but at the end of the day we’ve got to get the project moving forward.”

    Members of the Newark City Council sparred at a Wednesday’s meeting over proposed changes in the direction of the more-than-decade long effort to build Triangle Park, a park meant to provide a pedestrian link between Newark’s Ironbound neighborhood, Penn Station and the Prudential Center arena and spur downtown development. Councilmen Amador discussed his concerns over transparency. He further stated, “Most recently as a member of the planning board, I had the opportunity to approve the process of the redevelopment plan, hoping that our actions would create some movement, in part of those entities involved in creating the park, I voted yes to amend the existing redevelopment plan, since the approval by the planning board, the only plan, that I have seen and reviewed, is from Edison Properties.

    In it, Edison Properties would commence on developing the park, west of Columbia Street, no later then the fall of 2015, and construction would remain a site for mix-use residential and parking until 2016. It was also to establish by February 5th, funds in the amount of $5 million dollars to be placed in escrow, since the city of newark would be responsible to paying 4.7 Million, this amount would be returned to the city, making the total amount received by the city to total $9.7 Million dollars. Meanwhile to date the only information that I have received, by Boraie Development Corporation is a letter dated February 2nd 2015, illustrating the successes of the firm, in New Brunswick and highlighting one specific investment in the Central ward (Cityplex on Springfield Avenue). Nothing in particular to the area in question, or to the project in question. As a final note, lets not forget that this area, is part of the eastward, from the beginning of the process nobody, has schedule to meet with me to appraise me as to whats going on. As Eastward councilmen, I think I deserved a little more respect and the resident deserve the same”.

    (floor-plan view, the red circle represent the Prudential Arena, and below the area the green triangle depicts the future propose park with mix-use housing and retail)

    A first reading of the proposed changes was not immediately conclusive. The reading was conditionally approved – out of seven council members present, five supported an amendment that could change the original plan to develop the park, signed between major Newark property owners Edison Properties, Jose Lopez and the Newark Housing Authority. The Housing Authority initially assigned the development plan to Boraie Development, a real estate development firm based in New Brunswick.

    The council indicated, however, that they would wait for a presentation by the city in coming weeks about the potential changes to the $12 million before definitely going forward. East Ward Councilman Augusto Amador, voting against the plan, called again for transparency, echoing comments he made to PolitickerNJ on Tuesday.
    “The only plan I have seen is from Edison Properties. The only thing I have seen from Boraie is a letter that lists their previous successes, but nothing specific [about the Triangle Park project],” Amador said. “As the East Ward councilman, I think that I deserve a little more respect, and so do the people that I represent. This project will affect them.” Some council members were afforded review during a pre-council meeting on Tuesday, indicated that they had seen some designs plans by request.

    “I’ve been anxiously awaiting the plan, and I want to know what it is,” said North Ward Councilman Anibal Ramos, Jr., who abstained. “We should be afforded the opportunity to review the plan, and most importantly, get a commitment to a project timeline.”

    “It’s a shame that in ten years nothing has happened. This is project that could benefit the whole city of Newark,” said Central Ward Councilwoman Gayle Chaneyfield-Jenkins, who voted yes. “We should have a presentation, and we do not have to designate [Boraie]. We need a trigger date or the project will stay stagnant.”
    After the resolution pass, and prior to the second read, the council requested that the Economic Development department be forthcoming in sharing the design and details of the park finances. Additionally, the council passed the motion to sell city owned land for the creation of the park.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    from glocallynewark:
    http://glocallynewark.com/triangle-park-newark-newest-proposed-park-in-downtown-inches-forward/
    Last edited by 66nexus; February 10th, 2015 at 09:14 AM.

  14. #8444

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    This seems to paint Boraie as the more stagnant party, and presents Edison as a more proactive party. I'm no longer sure I know what's going on.

  15. #8445

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    I hope that version of the park moves forward! While a large park covering most of the site might be inviting to some, it would be entirely useless and vacant most of the tim due to its placement on the other side of the Prudential Center from the rest of the activity along Broad Street. If it is combined with a large mixed use development like that shown, it could redevelop those parking lots and reconnect the Ironbound and the Prudential Center with Broad and Market Streets along a corridor of retail. That is the only thing that will actually do the job and if it actually happens, it would bring many of the millions of annual Prudential Center visitors to the local shops along Broad, Market, and Halsey streets, thus benefiting them as originally intended.

    There are two proposals for the site. This is the low use one with a few stores and a large open space. That one story retail corridor rendering shown earlier showed the retail end of the complex, and the park is at the far end.

    http://www.nj.com/essex/index.ssf/20...k_project.html



    http://www.boraie.com/development/arena-village

    The second has a smaller park, but will have a very large development around it and also shows at least one new parking deck and several new likely mixed-use buildings. One would straddle the tracks to Penn Station, one would be on the Ironbound site, and one would be on an empty Gateway Center site. This is in addition to several other buildings lining the park occupying all of those surface lots between the Prudential Center and the rail viaduct. This would be the one that I would prefer as it does a better job of activating the space, something that the other proposal would not do well in exchange for more open space.

    http://glocallynewark.com/triangle-p...nches-forward/



    I just got back from a talk with the chancellor of Rutgers-Newark where we discussed the university's role in urban development and integration with the community. She mentioned a number of business incubators in the community and working with the Fairmount neighborhood just west of University Heights. During the talk, she also mentioned several interesting things about Newark's future developments.

    • The Hahne's building will have a collection of art galleries, studios for Rutgers and local artists, and a portrait gallery. They will occupy 50,000 square feet on the Halsey Street side of the building. This is in addition to the residential space and retail (Whole Foods!) which is hoped to activate Halsey Street.
    • The university is also helping the Halsey Street merchants by helping to write their business plans to help them procure financing, buying stuff from them to serve the university's needs, and even setting up partnerships so that they will accept Rutgers meal plans.
    • Their 15 Washington project which will have dorms for Graduate students will also have a large performance space on the ground floor in a large renovated hall inside the building. This space will be open to both Rutgers run performances and local performances by local performers. The second floor will have additional art studio and workspace.
    • The university is studying pavement replacement and art installations along Warren Street and University Avenue to soften the edges along those streets, making them more inviting. It would involve permeable paving (pavers and bricks), and street trees.
    • Most important is the study of an approximately 500 bed Honors College dorm on the McGovern's block, which is currently a parking lot bounded by New, Washington, Linden, and Halsey streets. For a sense of comparison, the NJIT Honors Residence is 600 beds and some offices, so this could be a significant mid-rise building.

    She also expressed hope that the varying residential projects, particularly Boraie/Shaq and the NJPAC tower would move along very soon and that Rutgers was trying to work with and invite local developers to help develop and improve Newark.
    Last edited by towerpower123; February 10th, 2015 at 05:32 PM.

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