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Thread: Newark Development

  1. #8446

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    ^Thanks for the clarity because that stuff was starting to run away from me. So if I'm understanding it now, it seems that Edison may actually have the better plan? That is, since they're holding open the idea for growing more residential development. If such is the case, the only problem that remains (and mentioned in the above comments) is that Edison is such a stagnant-minded entity with no proactive characteristics whatsoever.

  2. #8447
    Forum Veteran Newarkguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 66nexus View Post
    Passive recreation or retail center: Developers, council struggle over Newark's Triangle Park project



    Pictured is a rendering of Triangle Park produce by Boraie Development LLC, the proposed developer for the project. (Handout)

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    By Naomi Nix | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
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    on February 04, 2015 at 3:33 PM, updated February 04, 2015 at 3:34 PM




    NEWARK — After years in the making, Triangle Park may become a reality.

    Newark's city council voted today on two pieces of legislation which pave the way for Triangle Park to be completed after years of stagnation.

    The council voted today to transfer city land to the Newark Housing Authority for the creation of a park in the shape of the triangle in the blocks of Edison Place, Lafayette Street, McCarter Highway and Mulberry Street.

    The council also agreed to take a second vote and hold a public hearing on an ordinance that amends the redevelopment plan for that area to include retail opportunities for a second vote and public hearing.

    Both measures passed with five yes votes. East Ward Councilman Augusto Amador voted against the measures, and North Ward Councilman Anibal Ramos abstained. Councilmen Carlos Gonzalez and Luis Quintana were not present for the vote.

    The council's votes arrive after considerable behind-the-scenes debate among council members and developers about which company city authorities should choose to produce the project. Council members debated between two options at today's meeting — Boraie and Edison.

    Boraie Development LLC, the developer who produced the CityPlex12 on Springfield, has the backing of Newark Mayor Ras Baraka's administration and City Council President Mildred Crump.

    Boraie says it plans to build a park with several retail opportunities. Possibilities include a theater, a skating rink, and stores, according to Boraie spokesman Timothy White. Under Boraie's plan, the developer would hold a longterm lease for the land. White said the company has promised to have financing available.

    But Edison, which owns several nearby parking lots and other land, has criticized that proposal. Primarily, the company says it envisions a "passive park" with little retail. Shopping might discourage major companies from relocating to the city or investors from building more residential opportunities, company representatives argued.


    "This is the most important redevelopment place in city," Edison consultant Tom Banker said in an interview. "This is the place you could attract really really high end uses."

    Edison also says that when the project was first conceived during the planning of the Prudential Center several years ago, it was supposed to be the main developer for the park.

    Instead, the company says Boraie was able to negotiate a deal with the Newark Housing Authority to be the main developer for the site. The Newark Housing Authority did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

    Additionally, Edison says it will put away 5 million in an escrow account within the month for the project and chip in financing for another long-held plan of the city: building a pedestrian bridge between Newark Penn Station and the Ironbound.

    The final vote on the renegotiated development plan will be subject to a second vote by the city council at a later date.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    taken from nj.com

    http://www.nj.com/essex/index.ssf/2015/02/council_greenlights_triangle_park_project.html#inc art_river
    Edison is so full of s%$#. HOW THE HELL DOES MORE RETAIL AND SHOPPING DISCOURAGE RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT? HELLO! NYC?, edison?

    TRANSLATION OF THE BS......

    EDISON WANTS NOTHING BUILT. THIS IS THEIR EXCUSE TO KEEP LANDBANKING.

    EITHER THAT OR THEY WANT THEIR LANDS FOR RETAIL. (YEAH RIGHT.)

    ALL THIS IS ACADEMIC.Its never happening. Boraire will build an invisible triangle park to go alongside their invisible shack tower!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I smell corruption in City Hall.

  3. #8448
    Forum Veteran Newarkguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by West Hudson View Post
    I'd like to know if Boraie ever plans on actually starting construction on One Rector Street, since they broke ground on that project a year and a half ago.
    They NEVER broke gound.
    1. Dump truck is rented.
    2. Dump truck filled with dirt.
    3. dump truck driven to Rector st FARCE.
    4. Dirt is dumped in front of rector street building.
    5. Booker and shaq + others place shovels onto dirt, Take fotos.
    6. Dirt scooped back up by hired hands onto the aforementioned dump truck.
    7. Dump truck returns to the quarry it came from!!!!

    At no point did any ground in the actual Rector site get "disturbed".
    It was an orchestrated farce to kick off Booker's US Senate campaign.

  4. #8449
    Forum Veteran West Hudson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newarkguy View Post
    They NEVER broke gound.
    1. Dump truck is rented.
    2. Dump truck filled with dirt.
    3. dump truck driven to Rector st FARCE.
    4. Dirt is dumped in front of rector street building.
    5. Booker and shaq + others place shovels onto dirt, Take fotos.
    6. Dirt scooped back up by hired hands onto the aforementioned dump truck.
    7. Dump truck returns to the quarry it came from!!!!

    At no point did any ground in the actual Rector site get "disturbed".
    It was an orchestrated farce to kick off Booker's US Senate campaign.
    Oh I know...I used to pass that site twice a day on my way to/from work. But I was asking because I wanted to know if there are any legit plans to actually start construction (Corzine did the same thing with New Brunswick's Stem Cell Tower btw...prematurely 'breaking ground' on a major project that wasn't actually ready for construction just a few short weeks before elections).

    btw - the NJPAC tower is/was supposed to start construction during the winter season, which officially ends in about 5 weeks. Yet another failure? If neither of these towers starts construction this year, I think we can forget about them til 2020 or whenever we're past the next recession and well into the next economic expansion...

  5. #8450

    Default Newark Economic Development

    I attended a town council type meeting that was hosted by Ras Baraka and several others on Wednesday night at the NJPAC. It was the second of 4 meetings, with the next one being about education. The first was about crime safety.
    During the is meeting, the 5 people sitting there discussed the economic future of Newark and the ways that varying groups in Newark were going to help. There were a lot of key points! Also, while there was some mention of the conflict between Newark and outsiders, all present on both the stage and in the audience of several hundred people generally agreed that the city needs to work with outside forces in order to develop, just not at the expense of those already living here.

    • Thanks to decades of poor planning policies, urban decay, and white flight, the city has a LOT of room to regrow its population. 150,000 to 200,000 to be exact, although I think it could be more with an expanded light rail network and new train stations.
    • They acknowledged that there are too many subsidized housing projects concentrated in only a few locations. That has to be dealt with, but in a way that helps, rather than harms, the residents. There is apparently a large affordable housing fund that has not been used since 2006, which will now be used to repair or rebuild affordable housing units.
    • They also acknowledged that the Gateway Center's elevated corridors suck the life off of the streets, but did not mention a way of fixing that.
    • The views of University Heights have changed to a view that the many colleges in Newark and their 50,000 students are a potential benefit and that Newark has to try to work to reconnect the colleges to Downtown. The reason that Newark is not a college town is that little has been done by anyone involved to invite students downtown, and that is a problem. They propose creating an arts corridor connecting Riverfront Stadium, NJPAC, Prudential Center, the Lincoln Park District, and the Newark Symphony Hall and connecting that with the businesses along Halsey Street and Broad Street. This would imply streetscape improvements and infill development to fill in the many holes. The city has met with 50-60 artists that are strongly interested in living and working in Newark.
    • There are opportunities to create artists housing along Clinton Avenue.
    • The current "Brick City" slogan will be softened and modified to go along with Newark's new identity as a hub of the arts, something which Jersey City and Hoboken simply do not have enough arts related infrastructure to claim.
    • There is a need for Artists housing in the form of Live-Work space. This could be a solution for the many vacant upper floors of various buildings in Downtown and the other shopping corridors.
    • There are several programs being proposed to help ensure that large establishments like the colleges, the local big businesses, and City Hall will buy as much of their needed goods locally rather than using outside sources. This will help keep more money in Newark.
    • There is a strong desire to promote continuous development, rather than waiting for the occasional trophy projects. This will help unite the varying clusters of development into one continuous inviting area.
    • They also want to get as close to 100% local employment as possible for development projects and want as much development as possible, so long as it is controlled to create a better unified image of the city, i.e. each development should be beneficial to the community in terms of street interaction and scale. A number of job training programs are being set up or expanded to train Newarkers to do construction jobs and prepare them for working on these many future projects.
    • Maria Iglesias of M&M development was proud of her two new buildings at the intersection of Broad Street and 3rd Avenue in the North Ward. The project is called Harmony Square I and II at 103 Broad Street, and it combines 51 units of a mix of affordable, special needs, and market-rate housing all in the same two buildings, and no one was complaining about paying market-rate prices for a unit that someone else could get for a subsidized rate, and also that no one even cared that their were lower income residents in the same building. They all have access to the same amenities. She mentioned that this was a trend seen strongly amongst younger residents and that she looked forward to building a number of other similar developments. That specific project is a pair of 5 story buildings.
    • The upcoming completion of the new Prudential Tower will generate between 500 and 1000 new permanent high-paying office jobs and that they are looking forward to working with the varying training programs to hire Newarkers.
    • Thanks to the raising of the deck of the Bayonne Bridge by 65 feet, the Port of Newark will be able to accommodate the new Panamax sized ships and will dramatically expand accordingly. 200,000 warehouse and goods handling jobs are expected in the next 10 years and land owners are already buying up land near the port to accommodate this expansion on the current site of several big-box stores. Most of this is land that belongs to Newark, so it will also increase the tax base. The jobs training programs are already working to train people for these upcoming and existing port-related jobs, and are proposing better transit access to these locations.
    • Ras Baraka and others are dead-set on building a number of municipal parking garages, likely near the Prudential Center, although they are facing a fight with a particular element (likely Edison because of the risks to their monopoly). This would allow the city to consolidate the many parking lots and get them properly developed.
    • Newark has an app called the My Newark app for iOS and others which allows you to find out about cultural events and alert officials about issues such as potholes, snow removal, and illegal dumping, as well as access to train and bus schedules and flight status at Newark Airport. The alerts will go directly to those in charge in order to ensure that the changes and fixes actually occur. The app also allows access to government data and forms, ensuring transparent government.
    • The Valentine's day land sale has apparently already been hugely successful. Over 10,000 people have already visited the site as of Wednesday night to view the 100 available properties and the news had spread as far as Toronto. They hope to use this good news momentum to further promote Newark to counteract the constant crime stories. They blasted the varying local news agencies for their one-track style of coverage.


    The meeting than went into a discussion about what they believe Newark will be like in 5 years.
    • Far more residents would be trained for jobs and employed. The unemployment rate has already fallen by 2 percentage points in the 7 months that Baraka has been mayor, and continues to do so.
    • A number of residential developments are imminent both in downtown and the other areas. There are already an increased number of proposals and approvals for residential developments.
    • Newark hopes to become a model for urban vibrancy, rather than the previous model of managing urban decay.
    • They want to stabilize the outer neighborhoods, with a particular focus on the South and West Wards. Certain locations have already been identified as in need of INFILL development to fix the many holes in the streetscape. This has been identified as being necessary to create better neighborhoods. Complete Neighborhoods are Healthy Neighborhoods.
    • If PATH decides to build their extension to Newark Airport, the city wants to require a stop at Freylinghuysen Avenue as a requirement for approval of the extension. That road is route 27 and runs parallel to the route of the PATH extension about a block or 2 west, so it does not say where the station would be built. The site of the old station near South Street seems like a good location, as mentioned before on this forum, as it would directly serve both the developing Lincoln Park District, as well as a large still developing section of the Ironbound.


    Afterwards, the meeting went into a question and answer format, although some people did not actually asked questions and instead attempted to criticize the mayor and council, but no one else took part!
    • They hope to put as many of the 2000 city owned lots as possible to use as affordable housing. That affordable housing trust fund was mentioned as a way of funding these developments, combined with Prudential's near future $1 Billion in "Impact Investments." These were described as investments that both ensure that Prudential makes money while also helping the community at the same time. They are already doing this by investing in various developments across the city and region and want to do it a lot more with a particular focus on their home city of Newark.
    • It was asked, but apparently, the new Prudential Tower will pay property taxes, and that they did not get a tax abatement. Instead, the city helped to ensure their financing.
    • There is a "Live Newark" program that will be far expanded to help the city's government workers to buy houses in Newark, since so many live outside of Newark in the nearby suburbs. The program would offer $5000 to buy a home or $25,000 for new construction in the form of forgivable low-interest loans.
    • Woodland Cemetery, which has been a source of many problems for the local community, will receive a new perimeter fence in a week or two. This will be paid for by the city, but a proper renovation of the cemetery will not occur until the city can finally convince the owners and operators to do so, since it is not city owned property.


    It was mentioned before and several other times.
    NJPAC has full financing for their 1 Theater Square project and had full confidence from everyone that they will begin construction in 30 days or less, as of Wednesday.
    That would place the deadline on Friday, March 13th at the latest. Boraie/Shaq Tower at 40 Rector Street was NOT mentioned at all.


    Now for a few pictures from earlier on Wednesday.
    They are hosted at http://urbanismvsmodernism.blogspot.com/?view=sidebar



    Teacher's Village

    This will open later this month.



    This one is moving painfully slowly, but at least it is moving along. Once that cinderblock wall advances up the adjacent building, they can continue building the frames of the units. It is supposed to open in October. Good luck to them...




    This is almost done. It will be opening sometime this summer.






    The Calumet Building is history. Excavation is already well underway for its lengthy 7-8 story replacement.


    This last RockPlaza building is almost done.




    A through block beer garden will occupy both of the above buildings. It will hopefully draw in a lot of people year round!

  6. #8451
    Forum Veteran West Hudson's Avatar
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    Did GAP Outlet open yet? And has anyone heard of other stores that are planning on opening locations on Market?

    Glad to hear about the NJPAC tower - that would be phenomenal if it actually started construction soon. Hopefully the Shaq tower gets a redesign during this time since the last advertised rendering had the tower looking like a slightly upgraded public housing project from the 1960's.
    Last edited by West Hudson; February 16th, 2015 at 03:18 PM.

  7. #8452

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    Quote Originally Posted by West Hudson View Post
    Did GAP Outlet open yet? And has anyone heard of other stores that are planning on opening locations on Market?

    Glad to hear about the NJPAC tower - that would be phenomenal if it actually started construction soon. Hopefully the Shaq tower gets a redesign during this time since the last advertised rendering had the tower looking like a slightly upgraded public housing project from the 1960's.

    Yes, the Gap Outlet did open. A number of stores along that stretch of Market are closing and have "Going out of Business" signs, so I'm curious as to what else is going to come in, but hopefully more national retailers. And though I'm glad that the zoning ordinances have been updated, I wish they banned siding... vinyl or aluminum. After spending the weekend in DC, one key difference I noticed is the lack of that hideous siding in the majority of their housing stock. It makes such a tangible difference in the attractiveness of houses and by extension, streets and neighborhoods. I understand they are low upkeep but man, siding is more often than not, an unattractive alternative to brick, wood, concrete or stone. Just my opinion...

  8. #8453

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    Quote Originally Posted by scrollhectic View Post
    Yes, the Gap Outlet did open. A number of stores along that stretch of Market are closing and have "Going out of Business" signs, so I'm curious as to what else is going to come in, but hopefully more national retailers. And though I'm glad that the zoning ordinances have been updated, I wish they banned siding... vinyl or aluminum. After spending the weekend in DC, one key difference I noticed is the lack of that hideous siding in the majority of their housing stock. It makes such a tangible difference in the attractiveness of houses and by extension, streets and neighborhoods. I understand they are low upkeep but man, siding is more often than not, an unattractive alternative to brick, wood, concrete or stone. Just my opinion...
    I heard a rumor about 2 weeks ago about reopening a Starbucks Coffee shop near the Broad and Market Corner, since they have re-realized the potential with the recent development. Rainbow Shops and their entire chain of affiliated stores is having financial difficulties nationwide, so they are closing some stores. Additionally, the Radio Shack in the National Newark Building is closing very soon, which is again a result of the national chain's failure. RBH is supposed to be renovating and/or replacing a group of buildings on the Northeast side of the Broad and Market Corner as part of their Four Corners Millennium Project, so they are likely waiting out the remaining tenants in those buildings. The huge abandoned theater there is part of that project, but very little of it will survive the project. The other project is the 75 or 101 Market Street project, which will replace the buildings that are currently only occupied by Gallery Afrerro and Mattress King, with a huge tower of unknown dimensions. What is known is that it is the much talked about Phase 3 of the SoMA Newark project (Teacher's Village is Phase 1 and 2) and will have 700 apartments and copious amounts of retail and another mid-sized hotel. I do not know what else that will happen there, but I get the feeling that several building owners are waiting out the tenants' leases in hopes that they will soon renovate their buildings, rather than actively seeking tenants. Once Teacher's Village is complete and the Triangle Park development dilemma is sorted out, I think it will kickstart a lot of development and renovation of Market Street. If the favored Triangle Park project goes through, it will contain a very large development on the entire south and east side of the Prudential Center and finally reconnect it with the city, as originally promised.

    As far as vinyl and aluminum siding is concerned, it has been BANNED by the recently passed zoning code in most zone types. The new code focuses not just on mass but also form and street interaction. It will not effect the existing buildings, but will effect new ones, particularly any new Bayonne Boxes, which themselves have been completely changed. Due to the elimination of a need for or even a complete ban on sideyard setbacks along many commercial corridors, there shouldn't be a need for siding anyway as the walls would be on the lot line.

    DC is not the best comparison to Newark due to the fact that large portions of DC's housing stock is brick row houses. Here in Newark, much of it is single family detached houses on small lots, which is a major contributor to the city's problems and stubborn redevelopment. Those old houses are wood stick framed and originally had wood siding that had to be constantly painted. As the city declined, the wood siding was replaced with cheap, maintenance free plastic siding. It is ugly, but it works.

  9. #8454
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Wood just about everywhere in the US has been covered with vinyl.

  10. #8455

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    DC is not the best comparison to Newark due to the fact that large portions of DC's housing stock is brick row houses. Here in Newark, much of it is single family detached houses on small lots, which is a major contributor to the city's problems and stubborn redevelopment. Those old houses are wood stick framed and originally had wood siding that had to be constantly painted. As the city declined, the wood siding was replaced with cheap, maintenance free plastic siding. It is ugly, but it works.
    Why is it that Newark has so few brick structures? I can see in some outer areas like Vailsburg or Weequahic that were only built up in the 20th century, but Newark was a major city as far back as the Civil War, so I would think the built environment would resemble that of other 19th-century northeastern cities. Yet, all of the major northeast corridor cities have many more brick structures and attached homes, and even many smaller cities too (Camden, for all its faults, has a large number of brick rowhomes). Is it simply that Newark demolished most of them as part of urban renewal or after the riots, or were just never that many to begin with? And if the latter, why was that so? Did other major cities have stricter zoning even back then?

  11. #8456

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Elliott View Post
    Why is it that Newark has so few brick structures? I can see in some outer areas like Vailsburg or Weequahic that were only built up in the 20th century, but Newark was a major city as far back as the Civil War, so I would think the built environment would resemble that of other 19th-century northeastern cities. Yet, all of the major northeast corridor cities have many more brick structures and attached homes, and even many smaller cities too (Camden, for all its faults, has a large number of brick rowhomes). Is it simply that Newark demolished most of them as part of urban renewal or after the riots, or were just never that many to begin with? And if the latter, why was that so? Did other major cities have stricter zoning even back then?
    Not sure, but it was my impression that many have been knocked down over the years, like much of Newark's history based on ill-advised political decisions. I am not sure though.

    I do seem to remember that the James st. organization (forget official name) was actually formed to save those brownstones near well, James st. just outside U Heights and Washington Park from begin demolished in favor of some university structure. I am not sure how long ago. Either way, it is sad.

  12. #8457

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    I will say, that although I could not make the meeting at NJPAC due to prior commitment, I am on board with most of the ideas. As i had said a while ago, this administration is pro-development in many ways, and is even pretty aggressive about it. Not to mention that the administration seems to have solid ideas for the revitalization of outside neighborhoods, while still understanding the importance of a vibrant downtown neighborhood.

    The biggest thing for me, as i've said in previous posts, is the need to establish a solid base by connecting all the neighborhoods and areas at the street level. Once that is done, and thriving, the taller developments will most certainly emerge, esp as more businesses relocate here and as an influx of residents comes.

    It is VITAL to connect University Heights - Military Park - Lincoln Park - Washington Park - Teachers village - and (eventually) 4 corners. That would make a very nice, and very large, not to mention beautiful downtown neighborhood that can serve as a catalyst for both more tall development, as well as further investment and growth in the outer wards. It seems the administration is way ahead of me on that one.

    Baye Adolfo-Wilson comes across as very sharp to me, and I think the city is in good hands with him.

    For all interested, there is a nice little youtube video relevant to all of this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJsGXW9rqSo

  13. #8458
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    The riots claimed most of them. Rutgers, NJIT, UMDNJ destroyed most remaining large apartment neighborhoods,but you can see remnants of what once was .. areas such as north broad st. MLK blvd and clinton ave. james street, lincoln park . the roseville remnant shopping area. The pennsilvania ave corridor. and of course the Ironbound (downneck).

  14. #8459

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    The riots claimed most of them. Rutgers, NJIT, UMDNJ destroyed most remaining large apartment neighborhoods,but you can see remnants of what once was .. areas such as north broad st. MLK blvd and clinton ave. james street, lincoln park . the roseville remnant shopping area. The pennsilvania ave corridor. and of course the Ironbound (downneck)
    Thanks, I knew about the rowhomes in Lincoln Park, James Street, and along MLK, was not familiar with any up in Roseville or off of Pennsylvania Ave. James Street is one of the most beautiful areas of the city, it's a shame it's only a tiny neighborhood. My travels frequently take me to Philadelphia and Newark on the same day...it's so sad to see the contrast between the two, Philadelphia with ample historic red brick attached 3-story rowhomes, Newark with almost none.

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    Philly never had the big riots like Newark and Detroit.

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