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Thread: Newark Development

  1. #91

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    Lefcourt Newark.

  2. #92
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Thank you Dag! : )

  3. #93

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    my pleasure

  4. #94

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    Anyone move into 1180 yet? From what i understand Aug 1 was the date?

  5. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by G_Money
    Anyone move into 1180 yet? From what i understand Aug 1 was the date?
    I moved in, but I still have a lot of work to do on my apartment unpacking and all...

  6. #96

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    I need more Newark stuff people!
    I am addicted to the city...

    Be cool![][]

  7. #97
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Exclamation Newark getting serious with it's huge crime problem!!

    NYPD deputy commissioner to be named Newark's top cop

    Newark Mayor Cory Booker has chosen a high-ranking New York City police official to become his police director, the most important appointment for an administration whose success hinges on its ability to cut crime.

    Garry McCarthy, the NYPD’s deputy commissioner of operations, will be introduced by Booker in a press conference tomorrow, capping a tough week that began with four murders over the Labor Day weekend and continued with statistics showing a rising number of killings, shootings and gun seizures. Yesterday, two Newark officers plead guilty to dealing prescription painkillers.

    The Bronx-born McCarthy said in an interview today that after a successful 25-year career in the NYPD, he was geared for the challenges facing Newark.

    “Everything I’ve looked at tells me the community here in Newark has been held hostage by crime for at least three decades,” McCarthy said. “Mayor Booker is looking to reform city government within Newark and create a positive outlook here, and it really feels like a good time to get here and make a difference.”

    McCarthy, 47, started as a beat cop in the Bronx and rose through the ranks by taking on some of the department’s toughest assignments. He led precincts in troubled sections of Washington Heights and Brooklyn and was a commander in the internal affairs division before his promotion to deputy commissioner nearly seven years ago.

    McCarthy said he plans on applying his experience from all those places. He said he will attack violent crime by focusing on drugs and guns, work on improving the community’s relationship with the police department and be vigilant in rooting out officer misconduct.

    Booker said that’s exactly what he wants.

    “Hearing those things from him was essential because we want to restore not only integrity in our police departmant, but also let the community know they have someone strengthening the integrity of our office,” Booker said. “Garry is a cop’s cop who also served in leadership positions in internal affairs, so that will help us.”

    Married with two teenaged daughters, McCarthy said he will retire from the NYPD after giving 30 days notice, take his city pension and move to Newark for the director’s post. Booker said he hasn’t set McCarthy’s salary yet.

    Although the appointment must be approved by the City Council, Booker doesn’t expect any opposition. Most of the council members have already interviewed McCarthy.

    Read tomorrow's Star-Ledger for the first interview with McCarthy

  8. #98
    King Omega XVI OmegaNYC's Avatar
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    This is great for Newark. I was watching on the news, that Newark was rank #10 last year, for the highest amount of murders in the country (I believe the # was 97) . For a city of only 280,000, that is way too high.

  9. #99
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    RU business school invests $31.5M in the future
    It buys 11 floors of Newark high-rise

    Saturday, September 23, 2006
    BY KELLY HEYBOER
    Star-Ledger Staff

    Rutgers University sealed a complex $31.5 million deal yesterday to purchase 11 floors of a Newark high-rise to house its business school.

    The Rutgers Board of Governors voted unanimously to purchase part of 1 Washington Park despite the school's recent financial troubles. The university will spend an additional $51.5 million to renovate and expand the space at Broad and Washington streets.

    Al Gamper, chairman of the Rutgers board, said he had no qualms about spending money on the business school while the state university is laying off employees, canceling classes and eliminating sports teams to plug a budget hole.

    "You have to plan for the future," Gamper said following yesterday's meeting in New Brunswick. "We're not closing the doors here just because our budget got cut."

    The red-brick tower, which housed Verizon until a few years ago, is owned by Fidelco, a real es tate and development firm. The company's chairman is Marc Ber son, a Rutgers-Newark graduate and one of the school's big donors.

    Berson resigned his unpaid seats on two Rutgers boards last year to help deflect any questions about the ethics of the negotiations. He had served on the Rutgers Board of Overseers, which helps manage some of the university's finances, and the Rutgers Business School's Advisory Board, a panel that counsels the school's dean.

    Berson estimates he has contributed about $500,000 to the university and helped raise millions more for the Rutgers-Newark law school, which named a board room after him.

    Gamper said he saw no problem with the deal.

    "He had the space. We bid on it. We got appraisals," Gamper said. "I don't see any significant conflict at all."

    Berson did not return calls to comment. But his spokesman re leased a statement praising the purchase as "a win for the university, a win for the city of Newark and a win for the taxpayers."

    Berson's company bought the 17-story office building three years ago for $26.5 million. The complex deal finalized yesterday calls for Rutgers to purchase floors 1 though 11 in a condo arrangement. Fidelco will continue to own floors 12 though 17 and rent them out as office space.

    The university and the developer spent months haggling over the price after each side's appraisers came in with values that differed by several million dollars, Rutgers officials said. An independent appraiser was brought in to offer a third opinion, which was used to reach the $31.5 million purchase price.

    Rutgers will pay for the building using an $18 million special state appropriation that was secured during the state budget negotiations with the help of former Gov. Richard Codey, campus officials said. Another $7 million to $10 million will come from federal tax subsidies offered for urban development projects.

    The remaining money to purchase the building and fund the $51.5 million renovation will come from private donors and $40 million or more in borrowing.

    The business school, which is currently housed a few blocks away, will move to the new building after renovations are completed in about three years, said Rutgers- Newark Provost Steven Diner. The 15,000-square-foot addition will include a new glass lobby added to the front of the building facing the Newark Library.

    The move will help free up classrooms and offices in other campus buildings, Diner said.

    "Rutgers-Newark has a unique opportunity to expand space for other current and future uses of the campus, including plans for increased enrollment," Diner said.

    Campus officials have preliminary plans to continue expanding Rutgers-Newark's campus north.

    The new business building is less than a block from 15 Washington Ave., the former home of Rutgers- Newark's law school. The school plans to turn that now-empty building into graduate student housing, though campus officials are still months away from choos ing one of four plans submitted by developers for the project.

    Diner said Rutgers-Newark also will consider turning the parking lot behind the old law school into a block-long parking garage complex with street-level retail stores and rental apartments along University Avenue. Two nearby parking lots on Orange Street, located across from the former Westinghouse factory, also may be used to build new dorms.

    Kelly Heyboer covers higher education. She may be reached at khey boer@starledger.com or (973) 392-5929.

  10. #100
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Talking Look whos decided to come up with the big boys!!!!

    Defying expectations

    Friday, October 13, 2006
    BY PEGGY McGLONE
    Star-Ledger Staff

    Think you know Newark? If your images of the city are limited to Alvin Ailey at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, the planetarium at the Newark Museum and garlic shrimp at the Spanish Tavern — well, think again.

    If you've visited the Essex County seat recently, you know about the rich cultural district that's formed around Military Park, sparked into growth by the opening of NJPAC nine years ago.

    If you work here, you might know the maze of lobbies and walkways inside the Gateway complex near Penn Station, where cafes, lunch spots and shops — connected by walkways suspended above the sidewalk — cater to businesses located in the office towers.

    But do you know about the city's burgeoning artist enclave, where live/work studios and sleekly modern galleries are bursting with the region's best contemporary work?

    Do you think of the bustling streets of downtown, where the chirping of walkie-talkie cell phones blends with the heavy bass of hip-hop tracks from store sound systems; the bite of incense with the fog of bus fumes? Where kids in high-end hip-hop duds window shop alongside moms pushing carriages? Do you think of Newark the university town, where college students study and play, and nightclubs cater to both Latin dancers and Goths?

    The state's largest city is unquestionably its cultural capital, the home to a critical mass of performance and visual arts organizations as well as a Portuguese enclave, known as the Ironbound, that is welcoming new cultures with remarkable speed.

    Newark has its challenges, sure. An increase in street crime has caused concern in many neighborhoods and for many arts groups. Protracted delays in downtown housing developments have deflated much of the momentum created by the opening of NJPAC.

    But there are positive signs. The new light rail system now connects the districts of the city, and the steel skeleton of the hockey arena has risen above the skyline near City Hall. Several new and ultra-sophisticated eateries have opened — and more importantly — have taken off. And work is underway on an arts district to be anchored by a Smithsonian-affiliated museum.

    Newark's story is a tale of many cities, a sprawling narrative of difficulty and renewal, of promise and disappointment.

    Which Newark do you know?

    The arts

    Newark's reputation as New Jersey's cultural core is directly linked to the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, the two-theater complex that opened in 1997. From its modernist architecture to its upscale restaurant to its high-profile roster of acts, NJPAC has achieved a national reputation, maturing into the county's sixth largest performing arts center before its 10th birthday.

    That's not enough for its leader, though.

    "Newark is the London, the Paris, the Berlin of New Jersey. It's the center of where the arts are happening," said NJPAC president and CEO Lawrence P. Goldman.

    The New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, another of the state's flagship cultural organizations, makes its home in Newark, and performs regularly at NJPAC. Under the baton of Neeme Jarvi, the orchestra presents new works and classic favorites, and is a critical provider of classical music education.

    Down the street from NJPAC are the offices of WBGO, the giant of jazz radio and a partner in many live performances in the city each year. On the other end of the cultural district is the Newark Public Library. Housed in an ornate Italian Renaissance building on Washington Street, the library is a beehive of activity, offering workshops, concerts and lectures throughout the year. The Sacred Heart Cathedral Basilica is host to classical and liturgical concerts, while Newark's two universities — Rutgers and the New Jersey Institute of Technology — participate in the arts scene with student performances and concerts and shows with national talent.

    While these institutions get the lion's share of attention and funds, they are only part of Newark's cultural capital.

    "The arts are an integral part of this community, and not just the larger organizations," said Arthur Ryan, chairman and CEO of Prudential Insurance Company of America of Newark and co-chairman of the board of trustees of NJPAC. "There are a lot of smaller groups I was amazed to learn about."

    There are organizations like Glassroots, a glass-making studio on Bleeker Street that employs glass-making and graphic design classes to help young people develop self-confidence and self-reliance.

    Newark Boys Chorus School — located on Lincoln Park in the Lincoln Park Coast Cultural District — features a concert chorus that tours the world with a repertoire of classics, spirituals, jazz and show tunes.

    Next door is Symphony Hall, a former Shriner's hall that houses a 2,800-seat auditorium, a 1,000-seat banquet hall and concert venue and a 200-seat black box theater. Owned and operated by the city, Symphony Hall is used by community groups and independent promoters.

    Newark School of the Arts provides training for 1,000 students a week in a host of artistic disciplines, from instrumental classes to music history, ballet, tap and African dance to choral and percussion groups. Alumni include tap master Savion Glover and actress Tisha Campbell.

    The Newark Arts Council is the catalyst for many of these organizations, a partner that fosters collaborations and nurtures growth.

    "There is great strength in the arts community here," said Linwood Oglesby, executive director of the NAC, "and I think it will only get better."

    http://www.nj.com/onthetown/newark/

    Keep Reading!!!!!

  11. #101
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by JCMAN320 View Post
    work is underway on an arts district to be anchored by a Smithsonian-affiliated museum.
    Details?

  12. #102
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    It is going to be a muesum on African American Culture and it's influences on art, music, and pop culture. It will be run by the Smithsonian.

  13. #103
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Lincoln Park Coast Cultural District/Museum of African American Music

    http://affiliations.si.edu/Affiliate...ffiliateID=143

    Location: Newark, New Jersey

    Region: Mid-Atlantic

    Website: http://www.moaam.org/

    Description: The Lincoln Park/Coast Cultural District (LPCCD) is one of Newark's newest organizations, blending arts, cultural planning and event programming with community economic development. Incorporated in 1999, the mission of LPCCD is to plan, design and develop a comprehensive arts and cultural district, and establish a museum dedicated to collecting, interpreting, preserving, archiving and exhibiting African-American music.

    Profile: Plans are proceeding for the Museum of African American Music. The Museum of African American Music will be the first institution of its kind and will bring all of the musical contributions of African-Americans under one roof. Jazz, gospel, hip-hop, rock & roll, blues, house music, rhythm & blues, and many other modes of musical expression will be gathered together in an exciting interactive space for exploring the great breadth of African American music.

    Visit Lincoln Park Coast Cultural District/Museum of African American Music website >>

  14. #104
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Lincoln Park Residental Lofts:




    http://www.moaam.org/lpccd/project.htm

    The housing project will provide a
    pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use community,
    blending artist housing units, commercial spaces
    and recreational facilities for singles and families.
    New lighting, wireless technology, re-built sidewalks,
    eateries, commercial venues and security measures
    will create a 24/7 urban life dynamic.


  15. #105
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Exclamation Report

    Mayor Booker To Report On First 100 Days
    (AP) NEWARK Newark mayor assesses first 100 days in office

    The shootings and homicides haven't stopped since Cory Booker has been mayor of Newark, but Booker said there was a double-digit decrease in some crimes in August and September.

    Booker was scheduled to release a 20-page report Wednesday assessing his first 100 days as mayor of New Jersey's largest city.

    Crimes included in the FBI Uniform Crime Report -- such as murder, rape and robbery -- declined for three straight months: 6.6 percent in July, 22 percent in August and 20 percent in September compared to year-ago figures.

    Newark spokeswoman Desiree Peterkin Bell said crime-fighting will continue to be Booker's priority, and strategies will be aimed at how residents interact with government.

    "It's not just about more cops on the street," she said. "It's about looking for different ways to create a safe environment for everyone."

    Clement Alexander Price, a professor of history at the Newark campus of Rutgers University, praised Booker for creating a new energy in the city, but said Newark is far from safe.

    "We still have a nagging problem associated with gun violence and killings, and other crime issues still prevail here in Newark," he said. "I'm afraid there's been a subculture of crime in Newark for a while and it's going to take more time for him to root it out."

    Booker, 37, took over as mayor in July after Mayor Sharpe James ran the city for 20 years. He was expected to include other crime-related highlights at Wednesday's news conference:

    -- The recovery of 628 weapons so far this year, compared to 499 at the same time last year.

    -- Increased police presence in 14 targeted schools in Newark and the identification of faith-based organizations to help provide additional patrols.

    -- Starting a process of securing land and funding for the construction of new police precinct houses in the North and South wards.

    -- The hiring of Garry McCarthy, deputy commissioner of operations for the New York City Police Department, as police director.

    McCarthy's appointment hasn't been without criticism. McCarthy was found guilty in March of blocking traffic during an altercation he had in 2005 with two New Jersey police officers. A judge said McCarthy used "extraordinarily poor judgment."

    Three minority law enforcement groups opposed McCarthy's appointment.

    Walter Fields, a political consultant and former director of the New Jersey NAACP, said Booker could have waited to make the appointment.

    "I wish he would have taken more time to consider more options," he said. "This person comes with his own baggage."

    But Fields gives Booker high marks for making crime his top issue. Next, he'd like to see more plans for economic development.

    "Many Newark residents are unemployed or underemployed," Fields said. "He's got to figure out how he can invigorate Newark's economy so its residents can work and raise families and be supportive of Newark's small businesses. That's the only way the city over the long term has any chance of really turning the corner."

    Booker has also been pushing ethics and government reform, but his ideas still need to be approved by the Municipal Council.

    They include creating an inspector general, mandatory ethics training, banning political fundraising on public property and contracting with a forensic auditor.

    (© 2006 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.)
    Last edited by JCMAN320; October 19th, 2006 at 12:52 PM.

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