Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Prefabricated / Modular Construction in New York City

  1. #1
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,113

    Default Prefabricated / Modular Construction in New York City

    Inwood gets the city’s first prefabricated apartment building
    Broadway Stack, a 28-unit modular building, is just the first of many to come.

    BY LAIGNEE BARRON / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
    PUBLISHED: WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 2013, 6:43 PM
    UPDATED: THURSDAY, JULY 25, 2013, 6:53 PM






    By the end of the summer, uptowners can live in a Lego house: the city’s first concrete and steel, multi-story prefabricated building. Broadway Stack is a 28-unit moderate-income apartment complex built with 56 prefabricated modules. The modules were assembled off-site in a former subway car factory and then shipped to Inwood, where they are being stacked to form a seven-story tower.


    “It’s an exciting alternative method of construction,” said Stack’s architect Peter Gluck. “As the country urbanizes there is more and more need for modern and low-cost housing, and this one response.” Prefabricated, modular construction is having a New York “It” moment. In Brooklyn, Bruce Ratner has broken ground on a SHoP Architect-designed modular building that would be the world’s tallest. Work is also in progress for nARCHITECTS’ My Micro NY, the winner of Mayor Bloomberg’s contest for ergonomically designed apartments.


    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/...icle-1.1408115

  2. #2

    Default

    This is the future. The potential is endless.

    In a way it's a wasted innovation in NYC where money and politics dictates debate about buildings. Everyone from unions to community boards will resist a true turn towards this method of building.

    In less advantaged places of the world...prefabricated and modular buildings will change how people live. There is a fantastic initiative called Wikihouse that allows people to freely download basic house fabrication and assembly plans that can be plugged into a CNC machine for a "DIY" home.

    3D printing will further push the boundaries of open source home building. We live in an exciting time.

  3. #3

    Default

    I think you have this backwards. In NYC it could be a revolution, because it would allow the builder to circumvent a lot of the friction and waste inherent in NYC's building trades. Someone could set up a factory in PA to crank out modules that meet NYC code, and just truck them in and bolt them together.

    Elsewhere, modular is already pretty well established. There are lots of modular wood frame manufacturers out there. I also don't think the 3D printing this is going to play here. For all the hooplah about it, it's mostly for small scale prototyping. If you want to crank out stuff in production, it's slow and inefficient.

    Quote Originally Posted by IrishInNYC View Post
    This is the future. The potential is endless.

    In a way it's a wasted innovation in NYC where money and politics dictates debate about buildings. Everyone from unions to community boards will resist a true turn towards this method of building.

    In less advantaged places of the world...prefabricated and modular buildings will change how people live. There is a fantastic initiative called Wikihouse that allows people to freely download basic house fabrication and assembly plans that can be plugged into a CNC machine for a "DIY" home.

    3D printing will further push the boundaries of open source home building. We live in an exciting time.
    Last edited by BBMW; November 4th, 2013 at 10:05 PM.

  4. #4
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,113

    Default

    Modular may be established for low rise buildings, but it is very much revolutionary for multi-floor structures & eventually skyscrapers

  5. #5

    Default

    I think modular has a lot of potential and I'd like to see more of it, but it definitely has some drawbacks. As it is currently done it's great for apartments, but not a lot else. As with the pre-WTC steel-grid buildings, it doesn't allow for large open spaces. The modules need to be able to fit down city streets, so one of the dimensions is limited to that width x 2 (assuming open-sided modules were bolted together). Depending on the location, the other dimension would be affected by truck turning radii on the streets between there and the factory. The tighter the turns, the shorter the modules and the more of them it would take to bridge a large space. I guess you could bring them in with cargo helicopters, but that would probably negate the cost savings and there would be a public outcry about safety. There is also currently a lot of bulk between the modules. This seems like it could be overcome, though.

  6. #6
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    West Harlem
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    Broadway Stack, 8/23/13

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2631.jpg 
Views:	401 
Size:	62.6 KB 
ID:	17536Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2632.jpg 
Views:	161 
Size:	74.4 KB 
ID:	17537Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2634.jpg 
Views:	151 
Size:	71.4 KB 
ID:	17538Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2635.jpg 
Views:	149 
Size:	77.7 KB 
ID:	17539

  7. #7

    Default

    They look kind of funky in those Kremlin wall colors - too bad that will painted over (according to the rendering).

  8. #8
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Broomfield, CO
    Posts
    2,910

    Default

    All panels all the time. The fronts will be paneled over similar to the way the side is right now. I drove by this morning on my way to drop off the rental and they were already at it with the last row or so of them on the side.

  9. #9
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,772

    Default

    Rectilinear construction almost always leads to leakage and unsightly water runoff stains at the corners...

    Pre-fab does not need to be blocky-modular.

  10. #10

    Default

    The city should allow larger buildings on the few development sites in Washington Heights and Inwood, especially along Broadway.






  11. #11
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,113

    Default

    interesting result

    This modular constructed building looks like a modular construction

    I will be interested to see a result where they use the same method yet the building looks like traditional construction

  12. #12

    Default

    yuch.

  13. #13
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,113

    Default

    looks like port elizabeth

  14. #14

  15. #15
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Is this type of construction safe in earthquakes?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software