Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 91

Thread: Stop-and-Frisk Practice Violated Rights, Judge Rules

  1. #31

    Default

    The experiment may be about to commence. These threads hang around for years. Let's see what the murder rate is in a few year (or a few years after the appeals are exhausted.)

  2. #32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
    Let them get rid of stop and frisk, and we can watch what happens to the homicide numbers (which will likely rise.) It will be an interesting experiment. I wonder how many people (likely minorities) will have to be killed to get the results.
    Where do you get this stuff?

    There is no evidence whatsoever that stop-and-frisk has impacted homicide rates. As alluded to in the column Zippy posted, armed crime rates were declining well before this policy was enacted. There is no reason to think that trend would have reversed if not for s&F

    Scum Monkey is right. This is racial profiling at its ugliest. I cannot even imagine how this could pass any 4th amendment test. Or are you only concerned with the 2nd amendment?

  3. #33

    Default

    From the late 1970s to early 80s, violent crime dropped in the US. The rise in crime in the preceding years was mostly attributed to the post WWII baby-boom reaching young adulthood. The drop occurred as this group moved into their 30s.

    Crime shot up dramatically beginning in 1984 and reaching a peak in 1994. This coincided with the rise and decline of the crack epidemic, which mostly affected the next wave of young adults. In every year since 1994, violent crime has decreased.

    You might say, "So what, I know this." But I'm not talking about New York City; according to FBI data, crime in all major categories has been decreasing nationally. This cannot be explained by police practices in NYC that were never used elsewhere.

    There was a worry in the early 90s that within a generation, we would regard the present bad times as the "good old days." The drop caught everyone by surprise, and attempts to explain it were after the fact. The most popular explanation at the time was police action. Over time, that has been shown to be not much of a factor.

    The unique situation with NYC is that it was always regarded as the poster child of cities out of control, but there were places just as bad, many much worse. But who writes or makes movies about crime in Baltimore or Memphis? This perception was so powerful that it persists today. So the city became a model of crime reduction, when in reality it was a national phenomenon.

  4. #34
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    Actually, I think crime rate reduction is due primarily to the concurrent occupation of the Russian Mafia in Brooklyn.

    I mean, they both happened at about the same time, right?

  5. #35

    Default

    ^^ What about the Albanian mafia in the Bronx or the Italian mafia in Staten Island?

  6. #36

    Default

    Isn't Italian Mafia a redundancy?

    I've waited a long time for this.

  7. #37
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    Nah, "Italian Waste Disposal" might be....

  8. #38
    I admit I have a problem
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    North Koreatown
    Posts
    532

    Default

    Stop and frisks are already down 50% since last year in NYC ...

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	frisk.png 
Views:	218 
Size:	50.3 KB 
ID:	17535


    ... and did the city get more dangerous? Nope. Homicides are down another 25% in the first six months of 2013.

    If there's any evidence that limiting stop-and-frisk puts the city at risk, we haven't seen it yet.

  9. #39

    Default

    Another question: If the mayor and police commissioner think the program is so integral to crime prevention, why - after years of increase - did its use drop dramatically last year?

    The lawsuit was filed in Feb 2012.

  10. #40
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    They don't think it worked. They are just covering their legal arses.

  11. #41
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Since those at the top claim that Stop & Frisk is done in line with crimes committed & crimes ready to happen, it would be instructive if someone were able to create an overlay of the NYC Homicide Map and the NYC top & Frisk NYC Map:

    http://projects.nytimes.com/crime/homicides/map

    http://stopandfrisk.org/stop-and-frisk-map-nyc/

  12. #42
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    They do not seem to support or refute this directly. At best it shows no direct correlation between murders and frisks, and a predominant predisposition to just east of Bed-Stuy.

  13. #43

    Default

    City Council Overrides Bloomberg’s Veto on Community Safety Act


    By Andy Cush | August 22, 2013 - 06:00PM

    Great news: the City Council voted today to override Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s vetoes on two bills known collectively as the Community Safety Act. The bills will create an independent Inspector General’s office to oversee the NYPD, make it illegal for cops profile citizens, based on a slew of factors including sexual orientation and housing status, and make it easier for people to sue the department over profiling. City Council passed the packaged in June, and Bloomberg vetoed it a month later.

    The vote comes at a time when the conversation surrounding the department and its stop-and-frisk tactics are at a fever pitch. Last night’s Democratic mayoral debate focused heavily on the NYPD and stop-and-frisk, and a federal judge recently ruled the practice violated New Yorkers’ constitutional rights.

    Manhattan Borough President and NYC comptroller candidate Scott Stringer had this to say:

    The City Council today stood up for the civil rights of all New Yorkers by overriding the Mayor’s ill-advised veto of the historic Community Safety Act. This victory was years in the making-the product of grassroots support from New Yorkers in all five boroughs who responded to the excesses of stop-and-frisk, and the surveillance of Muslim communities, with a forceful call for change.

    This week, as we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, let us rededicate ourselves to Dr. King’s dream of an America where all are judged by their actions and their character, not by the color of their skin. The Community Safety Act stands as another critical step on the long road of history that bends toward justice. I thank Councilmembers Jumaane D. Williams and Brad Lander and the entire coalition for their tireless efforts in ushering in a new era where discriminatory policing policies no longer have a home in our City.
    http://animalnewyork.com/2013/city-c...ty-safety-act/

  14. #44

    Default

    Ridiculous that this is even a debate (let alone a practice in this great city).

    Walking down the street whistling a tune is grounds for being stopped and searched by police?!

    I don't even think I saw that in V for Vendetta.

  15. #45

    Default

    City Attempts to Delay Stop-and-Frisk Court Orders


    By Andy Cush | August 28, 2013 - 09:00AM

    The Bloomberg administration took its first step this week in attempting to overturn the federal court decision that ruled stop-and-frisk unconstitutional, filing a request that would halt the court’s mandated reforms until the city can appeal the case.

    Attorney Michael Cardozo wrote that the city was requesting the delay–officially known as a stay– “because we believe that the District Court Orders are erroneous as matters of law, and because implementation of the broad-sweeping panoply of remedies based on such errors are likely to cause irreparable harm to defendants and the public safety.”

    Specifically, the city expressed doubts over the court-ordered retraining of cops to bring stop-and-frisk within constitutional bounds, arguing that “not only will defendants be harmed by having to train on what they believe are errors of law, should defendants later prevail on the appeal, the officers will have to be retrained again, undoubtedly leading to severe and possibly irreparable disruption and confusion among the rank and file.”

    Judge Shira Scheindlin, who made the anti-stop-and-frisk ruling in the first place, will have to approve the stay in order for it to go through, boding well for opponents of the police tactic. Should Scheindlin deny the request, the city can file for a stay with the Court of Appeals.

    Either way, it will be a long battle over stop-and-frisk. Fortunately, the Community Safety Act, which imposes limits on the practice independent of the court’s ruling, was upheld by City Council last week.

    http://animalnewyork.com/2013/city-a...-court-orders/

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software