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Thread: Stop-and-Frisk Practice Violated Rights, Judge Rules

  1. #46

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    After 12 years fairly successful years as Mayor (I realize some here would argue), I wonder if this is really how Bloomberg wants to define his legacy.

  2. #47

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    I think what may upset Bloomberg the most is that the court ruling has pushed one of his favorite policies into election politics, and there's nothing he can do about it.

  3. #48

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    A good place to start (a quote from a Times Article):

    The recent decrease in violence is all the more striking because last year the department recorded the fewest homicides since it began a reliable method of compiling crime statistics half a century ago. The police recorded 419 murders in 2012.
    And given the political changes we're about to experience, the murder rate when he leaves office will be the lowest it will be for a long time.



    Quote Originally Posted by eddhead View Post
    After 12 years fairly successful years as Mayor (I realize some here would argue), I wonder if this is really how Bloomberg wants to define his legacy.

  4. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
    And given the political changes we're about to experience, the murder rate when he leaves office will be the lowest it will be for a long time.
    The N Y Times article you cite has nothing at all to do with whatever you're implying. I say "implying" because you provide no facts or data, just your opinion.

    What may be more significant in the article is this:
    Mr. Bloomberg praised Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly, saying the 19 percent drop in homicides compared with 2011 was achieved despite a shrinking police force and an increasing population. Mr. Kelly said he believed that relatively new policing strategies, including adding more police officers dedicated to curbing domestic violence, and monitoring social media to thwart gang-related murders, were working.
    So now they're talking about new strategies, not much said about stop-and-frisk.

    It's difficult to justify the policy with data because the data shows the opposite, as already posted in this thread.

    If you've listened to Little Mike's remarks in the aftermath of the court ruling, he's resorted to red herrings - like an anecdote about a woman walking home alone, and would you want her murder on your conscience.

    There's only one way to answer that, but it deflects from the real issue.

  5. #50

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    Bloomberg Sues City Council Over Police Profiling Law

    By Andy Cush| September 4, 2013 - 09:00AM

    Michael Bloomberg’s epic quest to stave off any limits to the NYPD’s power continues. Yesterday, the mayor sued City Council over a recently-passed law that will make it easier for New Yorkers to file a lawsuit against the police department if they feel they were profiled or discriminated against. The bill is one half of the Community Safety Act, which City Council passed last week over the mayor’s veto.

    Just last week, Bloomberg attempted to block another bit of impending oversight for the department, requesting to delay the effects of a federal court decision that ruled the NYPD’s use of stop-and-frisk unconstitutional.

    The two leading democratic mayoral candidates both defended the Community Safety Act and took the opportunity to distance themselves from Bloomberg. “Mayor Bloomberg can sue all he wants, but at the end of the day, we will successfully beat back this ill-advised litigation and ensure the prerogative of the City Council to reform stop-and-frisk,” said Council Speaker Christine Quinn.

    “I will withdraw this lawsuit and finally bring this stop-and-frisk era to an end [if elected mayor],” said Public Advocate and mayoral frontrunner Bill de Blasio.

    http://animalnewyork.com/2013/bloomb...profiling-law/

  6. #51
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Bye, bye Little Man.

    Anyone see Jon Stewart last night, talking about the current bunch of politicos trying to fill Bloomberg's shoes ... and then displaying a really, teeny, tiny, itsy bitsy pair of Bloombergian footwear? Hilarious.

  7. #52
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    no.... need to web it....

  8. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    Bye, bye Little Man.

    Anyone see Jon Stewart last night, talking about the current bunch of politicos trying to fill Bloomberg's shoes ... and then displaying a really, teeny, tiny, itsy bitsy pair of Bloombergian footwear? Hilarious.
    I did see it. Better yet, was the Colbert piece where he displayed a picture of the mayor .,.. except you could only see his face from his eyes up, the implication being that he is too short to make the frame. Can't find the vid on the website.

    Kind of a cheap shot, but very funny.

  9. #54

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    I wonder what people will be thinking about Bloomberg in 2-3 years?

  10. #55

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    Mixed.

    But if he's not careful, people will better remember the way he's acted during his last term.

  11. #56

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    I know this is not a popular opinion on this board, so I will duck when I say this, but on the whole, I think his legacy is strong. In my estimation his biggest accomplishment was steering the city through what could have been a disasterous economic downturn, coming out relatively unscathed, with few if any service disruptions. When you consider the economic condition of some other major US cities, this is a major accomplishment. I realize the downfall of Detroit, and problems in Chicago were years in the making, but I still give him credit.

    Overall, he improved the quality of life for NYC residents. He improved public eduation (although many would argue), and the city is on sound financial footings. And remarkably (in my view anyway) the city escaped was relatively safe from both a crime and terrorist perspective during his administration. All of that is what he gets paid for. The other stuff - while annoying is really nothing more than a distraction, with the exception of stop and frisk, and housing development. I am not sure where I stand on his accomplishments here on the latter.

    I realize this is a senstive subject for many here, but he did promote development on the Manhattan and Brooklyn waterfronts, sometimes sacraficing aesthetics for commercial interests. In that regard, he could have done a better job. And the city, Manattan in particular is more and more becoming a location for high net worth individuals - there is a real risk of middle class flight.

    But this is a tough place to get things done. For instance many of the transportation policies he promoted, were shot down in Alabany, but were implemented as best practices in other countries. Many developing countries in particular who are in the process of archetecting their infrastructre are following some of the Mayor's blueprints.

    Again, not popular here, but overall I give him a B+. Give him credit, he
    Last edited by eddhead; September 10th, 2013 at 10:37 AM.

  12. #57

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    This article fairly well nails down Bloomberg:

    New Yorkers should be ready for a dose of populism right about now. Official statistics show that half of New York City's residents live at or near the poverty level, while the few who live at the other end of the scale are seeing their income soar to unprecedented heights.

    And yet, Bloomberg was able to win relatively strong approval numbers from New York City's population. He did it with a potpourri of policy positions that led de Blasio to observe: "On health and the environment, he is Franklin Roosevelt. On economic justice, he's Adam Smith. "

    With great respect for Mr. de Blasio, but that's not exactly right. Adam Smith was far tougher on corporations than most of those claiming his legacy today. But the candidate's point is well taken: Bloomberg was able to quell New Yorkers' dissatisfaction with his pro-wealthy and pro-corporate economics by assuming liberal positions on lifestyle issues.
    Source

  13. #58

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    I think it is a bit tough on him, but directionally, I get it.

  14. #59

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    The reduction of crime spanned two decades and three administrations. Although little mentioned, homicides were reduced in three of the four years of Dinkins' administration. The steady downward trend over this long time period, not only in NYC but elsewhere, would indicate that no one person can claim that his policy decisions were the impetus; rather that there were other broad-based forces at work.

  15. #60

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    I am perfectly willing to give credit to all three administrations for their role in reducing crime. While true, reduction in crime rates over time is more or less a national phenomena, NYC crime rate reductions seem to stand out.

    The other point I was making was with respect to NYC as a terrorist target - it seems that the city has a pretty high readiness state for terrorism. You may disagree.

    I do agree with your statement about the danger of allowing policies and positions adopted or fortified during his final administration to define him. Stop and frisk in particular is ugly and not something he should want to associate with his legacy.

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