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Thread: Albany, Troy and random NYS

  1. #1

    Default Albany, Troy and random NYS

    These were taken around Thanksgiving

    If you'd like to see pictures of downtown and the surrounding residential neighborhoods, please go here: http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8101

















    White metal panels are replacing marble ones that were expanding and becoming a hazard



    Last edited by kz1000ps; January 27th, 2007 at 01:56 PM.

  2. #2

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    now on to the Empire State Plaza


















  3. #3

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    Now we move on to the Harriman State Office Campus. (I think I've talked about this here before, but just in case I didn't) It was built in the late '50s and is a testament to auto-centric planning. Built at what was then the western edge of the city, it has no stop signs on its roads (other than any necessary ones in the parking lots) thanks to the system of two roads with u-turn loops in between them. It is nothing particularly beautiful, but the previous governor has been moving the state jobs back to various downtowns in the region, and the campus will be redeveloped into a "Research and Technology Park" to take advantage of the burgeoning nano-science programs next door at SUNY Albany (upper left of the aerial), so I felt compelled to document it in all its mid 20th-century glory before it's wiped away for something surely better.

















    SUNYA's new "University Hall".... recognize that glass? It's a Gwathmey Siegel product




  4. #4

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    These are the nanotech buildings, called the "Center for Environmental Science and Technology Management" aka the CESTM. The blue-glass buildings were built a couple of years ago for about $3.5 billion (green glass in '97), and these facilities played a large part in having the SUNYA's college for nano-whatever be named number one in the country by Small Times magazine. The capitol region is hoping to become the next Austin, TX, and has dubiously dubbed itself "Tech Valley."









    now briefly on to the little cities of Menands and Watervliet. They lie on the Hudson River, north of Albany but south of Troy






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    final stop on this trip: Troy. It has no structures taller than maybe 8 stories and there are next to no parking lots to be seen. It makes for a downtown that feels like it's been stuck in time for 100 years and is absolutely wonderful to walk around.



    This is the Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, renowned as an orchestra hall with some of the best acoustics in the world


















  6. #6

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    Last one for now.


  7. #7
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    beautiful photos, thanks. Troy looks really charming. I've never been there.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by kz1000ps View Post


    This building looks exactly like a warehouse in Long Island City, Queens. As far as Troy and Albany both cities look pretty clean and look to have growth and an economic base. Troy, Albany, Ithaca, and Syracuse seem to be faring the best of the upstate cities. Other small towns upstate, Niagara Falls, Buffalo, Utica, and Rochester are in near or full dire straits

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy View Post
    beautiful photos, thanks. Troy looks really charming. I've never been there.
    Hahahahahahahahahahaha. Sorry but I grew up in Troy. The place is a SHIT HOLE. Sure it is beautiful but there is nothing there and the areas outside of downtown are ghetto as hell.

    Thanks for the trip down memory lane kz. Did you happen to get up to RPI? There are some beautiful buildings up there along with very pretty residential areas.

    Did you happen to get any pictures inside of the Savings Bank Hall? It is STUNNING! I used to go there to hear my mother sing (local choral group).

    And you should have posted pictures of Troy City Hall just to show people that even Troy had some horrible modern architecture.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by kz1000ps View Post
    It has no structures taller than maybe 8 stories and there are next to no parking lots to be seen. It makes for a downtown that feels like it's been stuck in time for 100 years and is absolutely wonderful to walk around.
    These days, any place without parking lots is automatically a beauty spot.

    ...even to its detractors:

    Quote Originally Posted by vanshnookenraggen View Post
    Sure it is beautiful but there is nothing there and the areas outside of downtown are ghetto as hell.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by vanshnookenraggen View Post
    Did you happen to get up to RPI? There are some beautiful buildings up there along with very pretty residential areas.

    Did you happen to get any pictures inside of the Savings Bank Hall? It is STUNNING! I used to go there to hear my mother sing (local choral group).
    Concerning both, the short answer is no. Next time I'm home I'll aim (no pun intended) to do a proper photo-tour of RPI. And as for the Music Hall, I haven't tried to get inside, assuming it isn't open to the public during your typical work or weekend day. But I too know its beauty very well, as back in my high school days I was playing there 3-4 times a year with the Empire State Youth Orchestra (you know.. they do "Melodies of Christmas" on WRGB ch.6) and the associated Youth Percussion Ensemble. If you don't mind me asking, what group did your mother sing with?

    And uh, how blunt of you in your kind words for Troy

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    These days, any place without parking lots is automatically a beauty spot.
    Ain't that the truth. It's incredible how subtle an effect it (zero-gap streetscapes) can have on forming impressions when you're conditioned for the near-opposite.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stern View Post
    This building looks exactly like a warehouse in Long Island City, Queens.
    That was built as a catalog warehouse in the late '20s by Montgomery Ward, who (along with Sears) built lots of similar-looking structures across the country at the time.

    For instance, there's this building in Boston (originally built for Sears) with a very similar plan that is now a retail and office complex, named Landmark Center:


  14. #14
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    In 2005 Albany was 10th most dangerous city in the country with a population of about 100,000

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