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Thread: Airbnb

  1. #1

    Default Airbnb

    Hi all,

    Heading to NYC in September, can't wait.

    Just wondering if anyone has used airbnb before?

  2. #2
    Forum Veteran
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    it's reputation based, on both the buy & sell side. You won't have any problem finding a reputable share, but being accepted to stay there is a whole other issue as a new user

  3. #3
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    NYC is full of scammers. Liars & Cockroaches (as an old friend used to say).

    Buyer Beware!!!

  4. #4
    Forum Veteran
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    Check out this guy LOL

    http://youtu.be/hBTgFE8i6rE

    He's putting 22 bunk beds, yes TWENTY TWO beds in his 2 bedroom apartment for rentals

  5. #5
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    the guy already took down the video, but gothamist stole it and republished:



    http://gothamist.com/2014/08/29/chec...ry_manhatt.php

  6. #6
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Don't be hostile to hostels! City Councilman Mark Weprin wants to open up the city to European-style lodging

    By Jennifer Fermino
    March 8th, 2015


    Mario Tama/Getty Images

    The more the merrier! One city councilman is pushing for more hostels — that's up to eight tourists to a room — in the city.


    Forget about Airbnb - the city could be on the verge of getting a glut of cheap lodgings that start as low as $30 a night.

    The City Council will take up legislation Monday that aims to bring European-style hostels to the Big Apple — five years after a state law inadvertently decimated the burgeoning industry.
    City Councilman Mark Weprin (D-Queens) is introducing a bill that would make dormitory-style lodgings legal, provided they are licensed by the ci

    Under the bill, the hostels could have up to eight beds in a room, shared bathrooms and communal eating areas for guests.

    “They’re cheaper [than hotels] and it’ll encourage young people to come to New York,” Weprin told the Daily News.

    He will announce the new bill on the steps of City Hall Monday at noon, along with hostel operators from other parts of the world eager to open in New York City, the country’s top tourist destination.

    The push to bring hostels here comes as the city is grappling with an ongoing debate over Airbnb, an online apartment sharing service for short-term rentals.

    The company is wildly popular — both in New York and other cities — but because of strict laws in the city that forbid using your apartment as a hotel, many of the company’s listings in New York are illegal.

    Airbnb, which is lobbying pols to change the laws that forbid its business, declined comment on the hostels bill.

    New York still has a few hostels — including ones in Chelsea, the Upper West Side and Williamsburg — but the number pales in comparison to most international cities.

    Last year, London sold 1.6 million hostel beds. New York sold a mere 300,000.

    Part of the reason is a 2010 law that aimed to curb illegal hotels, which inadvertently ended up putting restrictions on hostels.

    Since the law passed, 55 hostels went out of business in New York City.

    But even before the law passed, New York wasn’t much of a hostel town, said Feargal Mooney, the CEO of HostelWorld.com, an online booking service that specializes in hostel travel.

    That’s because there was no framework for opening them, and many operators were wary of investi

    Councilman Mark Weprin eyes a sea of tourist beds in NYC — "They’re cheaper [than hotels] and it’ll encourage young people to come to New York."

    “New York is missing out,” he said, pointing to studies his company conducted that show the city is losing out on nearly $300 million in lost economic activity from travelers skipping the five boroughs.

    “People think they are young students, they don’t spend a lot of money, but our research says they do spend a lot of money,” said Mooney, who consulted with city officials on the bill that’s being introduced. “They’d rather spend it on shows, tours, and restaurants [than on their hotel].”

    The few hostels that are here tend to sell out quickly, especially during busy times, he said.

    “Travelers aren’t going there [New York] because they just can’t get affordable accommodations,” he said.

    The politically-connected Hotel Trades Council, which is leading the fight against Airbnb, said it wouldn’t fight the bill if it gives communities “a strong voice in the licensing and development process.”

    "Even with the unprecedented hospitality glut facing NYC, we aren't opposed to a highly regulated youth hostel industry,” said spokesman Josh Gold.

    A similar bill trying to regulate hostels was introduced in 2013. That bill faltered after not getting much support, but Weprin said that’s because it was introduced late in the session.

    He claims his bill already has some support, particularly from Manhattan Council members

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/...icle-1.2142185

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