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Thread: R.I.P. Johnny Winter

  1. #1

    Default R.I.P. Johnny Winter

    Blues Legend Johnny Winter Dies In Switzerland
    https://uk.news.yahoo.com/blues-lege...7.html#Qi8x1dA

  2. #2

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    Can I suggest these rather lazy posts be combined into a tidier "R.I.P" (the dumbest effing statement ever) thread?

  3. #3
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Maybe a sticky sub thread. Saw him MANY MOONS AGO and Emerson Lake & Palmer was the opening act. The acid was pretty good too!

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by IrishInNYC View Post
    Can I suggest these rather lazy posts be combined into a tidier "R.I.P" (the dumbest effing statement ever) thread?
    "Lazy" doesn't come into it, please show some respect for the dead Paddy. It would be useful if there was a dedicated section where the passing of public/famous/infamous personages could be posted.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wobert Wedford View Post
    please show some respect.............Paddy.
    Ironic?

  6. #6
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    I really do think....

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by IrishInNYC View Post
    Can I suggest these rather lazy posts be combined into a tidier "R.I.P" (the dumbest effing statement ever) thread?
    Mixed signals here.

    Do you want R.I.P. or something else?

    I can move all death threads to a sub-forum, but Edward would have to create it first. How about Obituaries in the News and Politics forum?

    Sub-forums don't need to be sticky. They are listed on the main page.

  8. #8
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    A single Obituaries thread might become a bit unwieldy?

    With a sub-forum, people can just view/contribute to the threads that interest them.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    Mixed signals here.

    Do you want R.I.P. or something else?

    I can move all death threads to a sub-forum, but Edward would have to create it first. How about Obituaries in the News and Politics forum?

    Sub-forums don't need to be sticky. They are listed on the main page.
    I find directing dead people to "rest in peace" a nonsensical, empty practice. I was just referring to the general topic as "R.I.P" based on what people tend to post.

    And, on considering it more, I would agree with Merry in that a single thread is not the right move. An Obituaries (not quite the right title either I feel) sub-forum would likely be the best option.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by IrishInNYC View Post
    I find directing dead people to "rest in peace" a nonsensical, empty practice.
    Why does that not surprise me? You may not have any belief in an afterlife but have a degree of respect for those that do. Didn't the Jesuits teach you anything at school!!! Say 6 Hail Mary's and 6 Our Father's for your confession you naughty boy!

    And, on considering it more, I would agree with Merry in that a single thread is not the right move. An Obituaries (not quite the right title either I feel) sub-forum would likely be the best option.
    As someone suggested earlier, 'Dearly Departed' is an apt and concise title for the topic. R.I.P. is even more to the point.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wobert Wedford View Post
    Why does that not surprise me? You may not have any belief in an afterlife but have a degree of respect for those that do. Didn't the Jesuits teach you anything at school!!! Say 6 Hail Mary's and 6 Our Father's for your confession you naughty boy!
    Has anyone ever explained to you that you're simply not funny?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wobert Wedford View Post
    As someone suggested earlier, 'Dearly Departed' is an apt and concise title for the topic. R.I.P. is even more to the point.
    Why all the fawning? "Recently Died" could not be more to the point but I would imagine that would offend?

  12. #12

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    I use the oft repeated phrase rest in peace to mark the demise of persons who I did not know personally but contributed to my quality of life. Johnny Winter fits the bill.

    One of the great blues rock guitarists of all time and a great act in his prime. He was influenced by the likes of Muddy Waters and Willie Dixon and in turn influenced Stevie Ray Vaughn, Duane Allman, and Jeff Beck, among others. His interplay with Rick Derringer was sometimes over the top but never less than impressive. I was a fan.

    Sorry if anyone thinks this is trite, but Rest In Peace.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddhead View Post
    I use the oft repeated phrase rest in peace to mark the demise of persons who I did not know personally but contributed to my quality of life. Johnny Winter fits the bill.

    Sorry if anyone thinks this is trite, but Rest In Peace.
    An entirely appropriate phrase.

  14. #14

    Default The Lion in Johnny Winter: A Tribute to the Guitar Icon

    What are the odds of that story coming true? What levels of self-belief, resilience and talent did it take to transform those biographical details — one could easily imagine, say, Thomas Pynchon conjuring them for a character (The whitest blues guitarist! Named Johnny Winter!) — into the stuff of a legendary career? As fellow blues guitar great Michael Bloomfield said when introducing Winter at a 1968 show at Manhattan's Fillmore East, "This is the baddest mother****er." Winter was that, no doubt, but also a testament to the idea that with a lot of skill and dedication and more than a little luck, music can open any door.
    It's probably overly romantic to say that one can hear any sort of outsider's howl in Winter's playing, which first came to wider attention via a 1968 Rolling Stone article that praised him for some of the most "gutsiest, fluid guitar you ever heard," but at its best, there's a beautifully articulated flamboyance to his music. Faster and flashier than his blues god contemporary Eric Clapton, Winter's musicianship — a hyperactive, high-octane intensity was his great blues innovation — had the electric flair of someone who was determined to take charge of how he was seen by others. It was as if his playing (and his gutsy singing) was a challenge to audiences. Okay, you're looking at me? Then watch this.



    The Lion in Johnny Winter: A Tribute to the Guitar Icon

    The life of the Texas guitarist, who died on July 16th at 70, was a testament to the power of the blues

    by David Marchese

    JULY 17, 2014
    Legendary blues musician Johnny Winter died in his hotel room in Zurich, Switzerland, on July 16th at 70 years old. There are plenty of reasons why that's notable — Winter was one of the first blues rock guitar virtuosos, releasing a string of popular and fiery albums in the late Sixties and early Seventies, becoming an arena-level concert draw in the process — but it's the barest facts that remain the most inspiring. Johnny Winter, from little Beaumont, Texas, afflicted with albinism and 20/400 eyesight in one eye and 20/600 in the other, made an iconic life for himself by playing the blues.

    What are the odds of that story coming true? What levels of self-belief, resilience and talent did it take to transform those biographical details — one could easily imagine, say, Thomas Pynchon conjuring them for a character (The whitest blues guitarist! Named Johnny Winter!) — into the stuff of a legendary career? As fellow blues guitar great Michael Bloomfield said when introducing Winter at a 1968 show at Manhattan's Fillmore East, "This is the baddest mother****er." Winter was that, no doubt, but also a testament to the idea that with a lot of skill and dedication and more than a little luck, music can open any door.

    Johnny Winter and the 100 Greatest Guitarists

    In Mary Lou Sullivan's entertaining biography, Raisin' Cain, Winter, whose brother was multi-instrumentalist Edgar Winter (of "Frankenstein" fame), explained that, "Growin' up in school, I really got the bad end of the deal. People teased me and I got in a lot of fights. I was a pretty bluesy kid." That alienation, he believed, gave him a kinship with the black blues musicians he idolized. "We both," he explained, "had a problem with our skin being the wrong color."

    It's probably overly romantic to say that one can hear any sort of outsider's howl in Winter's playing, which first came to wider attention via a 1968 Rolling Stone article that praised him for some of the most "gutsiest, fluid guitar you ever heard," but at its best, there's a beautifully articulated flamboyance to his music. Faster and flashier than his blues god contemporary Eric Clapton, Winter's musicianship — a hyperactive, high-octane intensity was his great blues innovation — had the electric flair of someone who was determined to take charge of how he was seen by others. It was as if his playing (and his gutsy singing) was a challenge to audiences. Okay, you're looking at me? Then watch this.

    As a concert draw and big-seller, Winter peaked in by the mid-Seventies. (New listeners should start with 1969's Second Winter; this year's True To The Blues compilation is comprehensive.) But stepping out of stardom's spotlight gave him the opportunity to do his most valuable work, as a steward to the music that changed his life. Starting in 1977, Winter produced a trio of swaggering, earthy albums for blues genius Muddy Waters, of which Hard Again is the first and best. Those albums reconnected Waters with his own greatness — Muddy's prior Seventies albums had been uninspired — and delivered him a late-in-life critical and commercial triumph. After Waters died in 1983, Winter, who by then had already inspired followers like his fellow Texan Stevie Ray Vaughan, settled into a journeyman's role, releasing albums at a steady pace and touring even more frequently than that. It wasn't always an easy ride— there were struggles with addiction and duplicitous management — but it was as good, and honorable, as a blues musician can ask for. They wouldn't be called the blues if everything was rosy.

    Tribute to the Lone Star State: Dispossessed Men and Mothers of Texas — Our 1968 Cover Story
    When he wasn't on the road, Winter, who, it must be said, cut a striking figure on-stage up through his last gigs, spent his time with his wife at home in rural Connecticut, and was able to bask in the respect of fellow musicians, a testament to the truth that if you give your being to the music you love, the music can turn that being into a remarkable life. His now-posthumous upcoming release, Step Back, is due out in September and features appearances from Clapton, ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons, Ben Harper, Dr. John, Aerosmith's Joe Perry and others. They all knew what Winter meant.

    Towards the end of Raisin' Cain, Winter is asked how he'd liked to be remembered. He answered, simply, "As a good blues player."
    Johnny Winter was much more than that.

    http://www.rollingstone.com/music/ne...-icon-20140717

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