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Thread: New Jersey running out of Open Space

  1. #31

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    I agree that there is no general rule regarding space (and density) and friendliness.

    In an apartment environment, it may take a little effort. It is not always evident that someone has moved in. Elevators, laundry rooms, etc are areas of commonality. All it takes is one nosy neighbor.

    The suburbs have back yards, but sometimes the layout discourages friendliness - such as a large front lawn.

    The best is probably the old "suburbs" ringing business districts - detached houses but close together, with front porches. This was repeated in countless Brooklyn row houses, with small front yards and big stoops. On a summer evening, you couldn't walk down the street without encountering a gauntlet of neighbors sitting out front.

  2. #32
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    The landowner thought the address was a joke, but when she looked at a topographical map, she realized she was ...
    Building a home on top of a volcano

    Wednesday, June 22, 2005
    BY JIM LOCKWOOD
    Star-Ledger Staff

    Stories about suburban sprawl in New Jersey usually contain a lament for lost farmland, but this story is about new homes on something much more scarce -- the state's last available volcano.

    The old "Beemerville Volcano" in the rural Sussex County township of Wantage now has a house on top.

    "I'm on the cone" of the volcano, said Kathryn Kelly Herkert of Hasbrouck Heights, Bergen County. "It's been extinct for 440 million years. I'm comfortable with that."

    The placid, picturesque knob last spewed lava in the Precambrian era and is officially classified as an extinct volcano. Now, it's just another plot of ground on which to build a home, although one with spectacular views of the neighboring countryside and a history dating to Mother Earth's childhood.

    Geologists lament losing the old volcano to a house because the formation is the oldest of the very few volcanic necks, or magma pipes, found in New Jersey. (The most well-known volcanic neck is the jutting "Fraternity Rock" alongside the New Jersey Turnpike in Secaucus.)

    Michael Carr, a geology professor at Rutgers University, once brought students to visit the Beemerville Volcano, but stopped about 20 years ago when homes began to crop up on the apex.

    "It is too bad that a geological rarity is turned into a suburban lot," Carr said after learning of the latest home built there.

    After blasting began for construction of the home, some residents mounted a petition to try to preserve the volcano, but nothing ever came of it, Kelly Herkert said.

    At least one resident does not begrudge Kelly Herkert her home on the volcano.

    Henry Byma had a dairy farm at the bottom of the hill for some four decades until moving three miles up the road in October. His son runs the farm now.

    "If people are really concerned, they could have bought it," Byma said of the volcano. "Some people blame me, saying I sold it, but I never owned it. I guess people who live down there didn't want to look at houses -- they wanted to look at cows. People are different. Some don't mind and some want to see open space."

    Over the years, Byma's cows often climbed the steep hill to graze on the grass atop the hill. Despite an elevation of 1,000 feet above sea level, the grass on the hilltop grew faster than anywhere else, perhaps because of heat coming up from the extinct volcano shaft, Byma said.

    Kelly Herkert said she did not know the five-acre hilltop had once been a volcano when she bought it around 20 years ago.

    "At that time, I thought the address Volcanic Hill Road was a joke," the 59-year-old teacher said.

    It was only after seeing a topographical map of her property imprinted with "extinct volcano" that she had a brief pause for concern, and figured she better make sure it was extinct before building. She had her engineer call experts at the U.S. Geological Survey to check.

    "I certainly don't want to get blown off," she said.

    Along with being the oldest volcanic neck in the state, the Beemerville Volcano is perhaps the most unusual because it produced a rare geologic discovery: carbonatite, a rock not often found in North America.

    And while the old volcano will never blow its top again, there is a potential danger because the carbonatites there are especially rich in radioactive elements that produce radon, Carr said. Houses built in that area should have radon traps or diverters to prevent high radon levels accumulating in living spaces, he said.

    Besides Beemerville and Fraternity Rock, evidence of other volcanic activity in the state includes the Palisades and Watchung Mountains, said Claude Herzberg, another Rutgers geology professor.

    "Our geology is rapidly disappearing in the state, in terms of good outcrops," he said. "It's been a bit of a frustration for us because in the old days we used to take busloads of kids to various sites."

    Herzberg said despite its age and the presence of carbonatite, Beemerville doesn't get the respect of the volcanoes to the east.

    "Beemerville is twice as old as the Watchungs and Palisades, but from a geological point of view, they are by far more important," he said. "They (date from) the breakup of continents and the formation of the Atlantic Ocean. You don't preserve things based upon age. It (Beemerville Volcano) had it's own interesting history, but when people go to scientific meetings, it's not the sort of thing they talk about."

    And, Herzog said, "one difficult thing for Beemerville is it's not a spectacular-looking volcano, like Mount Saint Helens."

    Still, the view isn't bad.

    Kelly Herkert's two-story cape- style home, which is still under construction, has lots of windows to take in the hill's magnificent vistas of the patchwork of farms, rolling hills and valleys in northern Sussex County and neighboring Orange County, N.Y. The tip of the High Point Monument in Montague is visible just above the treeline to the northwest, while Hamburg Mountain and ski resorts in Vernon form the horizon to the east.

    Reddish rock blasted away for the home's foundation is thought to be due to the prior lava flows, Kelly Herkert said. Byma also said the hill had bluish-green rocks.

    Kelly Herkert, who teaches special education and algebra at the Sussex County Charter School for Technology in Sparta, said she hopes to be able to have her students learn all about the volcano by visiting the site.

    "We are going to take field trips," she said.

    Jim Lockwood may be reached at jlockwood@starledger.com or (973) 383-0516.

  3. #33
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Which building are you referring to Guys?


    I was in a small 4 story between 1st and 2nd on Washington, and people did not do much to try to meet each other there.

    You came in with your group of friends, talked with them, and went out with them.

    The only times I saw people meeting others were in special cases, such as:

    If the people themselves were involved in something in common like Volleyball, Soccer, or even Ski Club.

    If they had kids. For some reason parents talk to each other more than singles. Maybe it is the pack instinct. I do not know.


    People that I have seen in Hoboken do not go out of their way to avoid contact. It is not as insulated as some other places, but it is like a soft buffer.

    People in my place were fine with each other when you bumped into them on the stairs, but in general noone in my building ever had a social event with any other in the building. It was all Import-Export...


    I am also wondering about the crowded factor. People tend to like to have their own space. The more you cram people together, the more they deliberately ignore a lot of things so that they are not bothered by the things that they wold normally not notice if they were living on their own land/lot.

    Once you break through this shell, the people are usually just as friendly as any other, but when it is up, they seem to be seperated by their own 10' of space that allows them not to be bothered as much in a crowded subway or listening to someone elses TV in the apartment next door.

    Ah well, just my observations....

  4. #34
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    State, Newark in talks on Highlands land buy

    Monday, June 27, 2005
    BY STEVE CHAMBERS
    Star-Ledger Staff

    The state is quietly negotiating with Newark officials to buy development rights to thousands of acres the city owns in the northern Highlands.

    Supporters call it an opportunity to ensure that 10,000 acres of prime property will be forever preserved -- at a relatively cheap price of $11 million.

    But critics call it a waste of money, saying the land, which surrounds the city's five reservoirs, is undevelopable. They argue the state should instead focus its limited resources on small landowners harmed by last year's sweeping preservation law or properties more imminently threatened by building.

    "It's another Newark bailout, as far as I'm concerned," said Dave Shope, who owns 58 acres in Lebanon Township that probably cannot be developed.

    The deal between Newark and the state's Green Acres program is being hammered out on the heels of last year's Highlands Preservation Act. That law, signed in August, puts more than 415,000 acres of Highlands off limits to large-scale development, including the watershed lands around the Newark reservoirs.

    Even before the Highlands law was passed, the Legislature barred development on watershed properties to protect water supplies. Still, supporters of the preservation effort point out that the city has for decades launched development proposal after proposal in a bid to shore up its teetering finances.

    "These are very important watershed lands that Newark made a huge investment in long ago," said Michael Catania, an architect of the 1998 bond initiative that raised $3 billion for land preservation. "We can help Newark, ensure this property never gets developed and open up some great recreation lands."

    Newark began amassing the property, which spreads across Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties, in the late 1800s, after deadly cholera outbreaks traced to tainted city wells.

    With state approval, the city began buying up property -- or taking it by condemnation when landowners stood in the way. It then built a series of reservoirs and a 21-mile pipeline to carry the pristine water southeast. Today, that system provides water to hundreds of thousands of New Jersey residents.

    Over the years, Newark repeatedly but unsuccessfully tried to develop the land. In the late 1970s, it proposed building 5,000 houses on thousands of acres. A decade later, plans called for housing as well as a golf course.

    Rather than try to battle each new proposal, the state began buying up the city's development rights, ensuring that nothing could ever be built. Green Acres has already paid the city $27 million over the past few years to restrict building on about 75 percent of the city's 35,000 acres of watershed property. The current negotiations would lock up the remaining 10,000 acres at a price of about $1,100 an acre.

    The negotiations, however, have been clouded by the Highlands bill. When they approved the law, lawmakers pledged to compensate private landowners whose property could no longer be developed at pre-law prices. But the state's $3 billion open-space fund is starting to run dry and the $11 million price tag amounts to a big chunk of the $50 million Green Acres intends to spend in the Highlands this year.

    That has some landowners uneasy.

    Told of the Newark negotiations, Ed Gagne, an architect in Hunterdon County who owns 17 vacant acres, said no one in the state has expressed an interest in buying his land.

    "I'm tired of supplying the water to lowlanders, so they can make a huge profit at the expense of my land," he said.

    But Richard Monteilh, Newark's business administrator, said it is only fair that the city receive some compensation for giving up any hope of developing its property. He said the city is selling the land cheaply in the public interest, unlike some landowners who seem bent on holding out for higher prices.

    "I'm sure Green Acres would run to other landowners if they would behave in a reasonable way to accommodate the interests of the state without breaking the bank," Monteilh said.

    John Flynn, who heads Green Acres, agreed that it is a matter of fairness, and he also insisted that taxpayers are getting a good deal. He said that by purchasing development rights, the state will be able to make the land available to hikers and other recreational users.

    "This land is the best of the Highlands," he said.

    Others worry about large-scale development proposals that are moving forward in the Highlands. Near the Pequannock watershed lands in West Milford, for example, residents and local officials are fighting a development of 280 townhouses by K. Hovnanian Homes. Although the land is in the Highlands preservation area, K. Hovnanian won enough approvals before passage of the act to win an exemption.

    "There are a lot of properties that are in play up here," said Robin O'Hearn of Skylands Clean, an environmental group in Passaic County. "I would rather see them buy land that is threatened with development than land that is never going to be developed."

    Most of the 10,000 acres in question are in West Milford, a rural community that has long sparred with Newark over issues of development and taxation.

    West Milford fought Newark's largest housing proposal through years of litigation that ended in 1983.

    After losing the case, Newark filed appeals that reduced its contributions in lieu of taxes by more than $4 million, said Martin Murphy, a Riverdale lawyer who defended the township.

    If the state buys the remaining development rights, it could be a double whammy for West Milford. Kevin Byrnes, the West Milford clerk, predicted the city would then likely seek a further tax adjustment, claiming the land would now be worth less.

    "Between the Highlands Act and the old moratorium on development of watershed properties, these lands aren't going to be developed," he said. "A lot of questions are being raised up here about taxpayer money being spent on this property or any others."

    Steve Chambers covers land-use issues. He may be reached at schambers@starledger.com or (973) 392-1674.

  5. #35

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    August 17, 2005
    Driven by Development

    By GLENN COLLINS

    NORTH HALEDON, N.J., Aug. 15 - Call it a tale of two townships.

    Across the state border, they are 30 minutes, and 20 highway miles, apart. The borough of North Haledon in Passaic County, N.J., is verging on maximum buildout. Seventy percent of the town of Tuxedo in Orange County, N.Y., is open land.

    But the towns are linked by more than the rainwater from Tuxedo that becomes the pure drinking water flowing from North Haledon's 1,431 wells.

    The destinies of both municipalities are being driven by the urgency of escalating development. That point was made very publicly last month when Randy George, North Haledon's mayor, rose to take the microphone at a crowded Tuxedo public hearing on a new subdivision. He was the only New Jersey official who had made the trip.

    Not unlike Marley's Ghost, he summoned up a dire specter: his premonition of Tuxedo's future.

    Developers lie, Mr. George said from all-too-personal experience. They offer charming architects' renderings that might bear little resemblance to the projects they build. They talk about revenue riches but leave towns with schools to build, sewers to pay for and taxes to raise.

    "The developers promise you everything, but you must remember, they are there to make money," he cautioned the audience in Tuxedo's 1928 town hall. "And as soon as they are gone, you're left holding the bag." The residents of 3.4-square-mile North Haledon and 45.6-square-mile Tuxedo are at the fulcrum of longstanding demographic and developmental forces that have increasingly claimed the attention of local governments and agitated residents across the region.

    New Jersey, the nation's most densely populated state, is expected to grow by more than 750,000 people in the next decade or so. Planners predict that the demand from young home buyers, and baby boom grandparents retiring to designer communities in record numbers, will quickly consume all developable land.

    "Development has been happening for hundreds of years, but it's more intense than ever because there is so little land left," Mr. George said.

    And in a surprising admission for a politician, the mayor said that he - and the six-person Borough Council that he works with closely - had, in part, failed. "We've done well in limiting development, but we couldn't stop it," Mr. George said. Of the new residents, he said, "Though they pay taxes, they cost us money for services." He ticked off a few of the borough's developmental headaches:

    Its insurers required North Haledon to buy a $750,000 new ladder truck for its volunteer fire department, to reach the tall new town houses being built in an abandoned quarry by K. Hovnanian Homes. Then the borough had to contribute $100,000 for an addition to the firehouse on High Mountain Avenue to shelter the new truck.

    On Sept. 27, voters will consider a $30 million referendum to replace a 100-year-old elementary school.

    The police force has grown from 17 to 18, and the public works department has hired new officials.

    North Haledon is planning a $950,000 addition to its public works garage. It already had to buy a new $300,000 Jet-Vac machine to scour its sewer lines. To pay for such amenities, the borough had to impose a sewer-connection fee of $7,400 per unit on developers "because the state won't support towns by enacting developer-impact fees," the mayor said.

    Burly and bearded, the 52-year-old Mr. George - who is on occasion taken for the actor John Malkovich - has held office since 1999. He and his wife, Lynn, have raised four daughters during the two decades they have lived in North Haledon. A lifelong Republican, he insists that despite his battles with builders, "I am not a tree-hugger."

    Like 14 of the 16 mayors in Passaic County, he is a part-timer. Salary: $5,000 a year. He regularly spends 35 hours a week on mayoral duties, and his political avocation has often competed with his painting contracting business.

    Developers have the upper hand because "they have more lobbying power than the towns, and more experience than many of the mayors and council people," the mayor contended. "They know more than I'll ever know about getting what they want."

    Or as the North Haledon council president, Bruce O. Iacobelli - like the mayor, a Republican - said in an interview: "You have to watch everything the developers do, because they try to get in and get out as quickly as they can."

    The borough's vigilance is such that on Aug. 3, it declared one developer, Belmont Homes, in default of its agreement to complete a six-unit complex on Sturr Street after an inspector found construction deficiencies. The developer has promised to address the problems.

    The adversarial relationship seems never-ending, Mr. George said. Hovnanian tried to pack more than 700 town houses on its 101-acre quarry property but North Haledon wrestled the builder down to the current total, 301, he said.

    "There are always negotiations that go on between a town and a developer," said Doug Fenichel, a spokesman for Hovnanian. He rejected any suggestion that Hovnanian has a build-it-and-run approach: "You don't survive in business since 1959, as we have, if you aren't taking care of municipalities."

    Well-manicured, working-class and proud of it, this borough some two miles from Paterson had a 2002 population of 8,033, according to a census estimate, but will soon reach 9,000, Mayor George said.

    In Tuxedo, there is still farmland and open space, but, according to Mike Edelstein, a psychology professor at Ramapo College who is the Democratic candidate for Orange County executive in the Nov. 8 election, "we are moving toward buildout like lightning."

    Although formerly agrarian New Jersey towns saw a prodigious amount of development after World War II, the current growth in Orange County is "happening at a pace that is much faster," Dr. Edelstein said. "Without effective planning, we are heading toward a high tax base, a relative lack of services, impossibly congested roads and school-tax revolts."

    In Tuxedo, Mayor George spoke in opposition to a plan to build Sterling Forge, 107 minimansions on a 575-acre tract of privately owned land within the 20,400-acre Sterling Forest, a preserve that New York, New Jersey and private donors spent $78.2 million to make forever wild. The turnout was so large that the hearing will be resumed Monday night, and Mayor George will be there. Mary Yrizarry, a longtime Tuxedo resident, is looking forward to the mayor's return, since his original speech "gave comfort to a lot of people who are afraid that town governments are not paying attention to these issues," she said.

    "The idea that one town government would tell another town government how it really was - that's quite unusual."

    But to Louis Heimbach, the president of Sterling Forest L.L.C., the Tuxedo developer, opponents of Sterling Forge "don't want anything to happen here."

    "The world we live in has been built by development," he said. "Our world didn't get here thanks to the tooth fairy. Without developers we'd all be living in caves."

    Developers insist that towns have all the advantages, by determining zoning in their state-mandated master plans, and in requiring new developments to satisfy inspections, performance bonds and "150 different permits with five different layers of government involved," said Patrick O'Keefe, chief executive of the New Jersey Builders Association in Robbinsville.

    Mayor George responded, "I want them regulated by as many people as often as possible."

    But Mr. Fenichel of Hovnanian worries that antigrowth bias will drive New Jersey residents - and jobs - away.

    The state should be building 50,000 homes a year to keep abreast of its growing population, he said, but "only 25,000 to 35,000 new homes a year are being built."

    Mr. O'Keefe said: "Nimby says go elsewhere. But when young people need a new place to live, or aging parents need a place to downsize, or if the marriage breaks up and the partners are looking for a place to go, they find that elsewhere is not a place on the map."

    Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company

  6. #36
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    "The state should be building 50,000 homes a year to keep abreast of its growing population, he said, but "only 25,000 to 35,000 new homes a year are being built."

    Mr. O'Keefe said: "Nimby says go elsewhere. But when young people need a new place to live, or aging parents need a place to downsize, or if the marriage breaks up and the partners are looking for a place to go, they find that elsewhere is not a place on the map.""


    Awwww.


    Well guess what, overbuilding ahead of infrastructure does NOONE any good. You get an additional 5000 people in a town of 20,000 (which is a decent sized suburban town) and you will have school, FD, PD, drainage, sewerage and power problems.

    You build a bunch of luxury homes, like what they did by Ramapo Reservation in northern NJ, and cut down all the trees on the lot to make construction easier, you get deer coming out, in broad daylight, to look for a way to cross the street from somones newly-sodded back yard back over to the reserve.

    You get "horrible" tales of bears "invading" residential areas that were once THEIR homes.

    Tree hugger or not, it annoys me when I hear some of these things and see the result of greedy "back 'em in as tight as you can" 'luxury' developments. You think they would try a bit harder to make people happy in the long run.

    Besides their shareholders and executives that is.

  7. #37

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    If the people in Tuxedo are smart, they will try to limit the development from going full speed. Tuxedo, and Orange County in general, are growing fast, mainly because Westchester and Rockland are overbuilt in some areas and unaffordable in others. However, in Northern Weschester and in parts of Rockland that are inland, you have towns that have sucessfully preserved open spaces. If you go to some of these towns, there are preserved barns, forests, and dirt roads. I would hope that people in Orange, Putnam, and Dutchess preserve as much land as possible, lest they want McMansions to devour everything.

  8. #38
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Lightbulb To vote or not to vote for open space

    NJ.com
    Open space question to be on ballot

    The state's voters will decide in November whether to approve borrowing $200 million to preserve open space under a bill to be signed today by Gov. Jon S. Corzine.

    The plan proposes spending $109 million for preserving open space and parkland, $73 million to preserve farmland, $12 million on anti-flooding efforts and $6 million on historic preservation through the year 2010.

    The money would replenish the Garden State Preservation Trust program, which has preserved more than 292,650 acres of land in New Jersey since 1998.

    Corzine would prefer to fund open space preservation through his plans to make more money off state assets such as toll roads, but environmentalists worried that any delay would risk losing more land to development.

    "New Jersey, the nation's most densely populated state, is running out of time to protect diminishing tracts of open space,'' said Assemblyman John McKeon, D-Essex, a bill sponsor. "New Jersey is losing 50 acres a day to development. Passage of this land preservation referendum is critically important.''

    Under a compromise between Corzine and legislators, debt incurred by the borrowing could be paid off from money raised through Corzine's plan if it is approved. Corzine hasn't yet unveiled a formal proposal.

    The open space question will likely be among four public questions on the November ballot.

    Already approved are questions asking voters whether to:

    — Permanently dedicate all money earned from last year's sales tax increase to property tax relief.

    — Revise language outlining when voting rights can be denied. The plan would delete the phrase "idiot or insane person'' and replace it with the phrase "person who has been adjudicated by a court of competent jurisdiction to lack the capacity to understand the act of voting.''

    — Approve borrowing $450 million to fund stem cell research for 10 years.


    Associated Press

  9. #39

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    here's the answer for future generations!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arcology

  10. #40

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    That doesn't actually seem like a bad idea. The likelihood lies probably around 2080 or so but it's a good idea nonetheless.
    Also, NJ should push muchmuch harder to preserve open space and force developers to build on our cities. Problem is, it's expensive to build in a city and the street grids are already setup; Whereas a new community development can be setup however they pleased

  11. #41
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    And I just LOVE the McMansion-shoulder-to-shoulder-20'-front-yard-Meandering-culdesac developments they are mushrooming up all over.

    And unlike California, we don't have wildfires burning the houses built on our former natural space.

    Unless we can get the national guard to start doing air exercises in different locations....


    Signal flare anyone?

  12. #42
    King Omega XVI OmegaNYC's Avatar
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    ^^^



    just let me know when ya ready!

  13. #43
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Open Space!

    Coalition campaigns for open space preservation

    by Dunstan McNichol Wednesday September 19, 2007, 1:17 PM


    Amanda Brown/The Star-Ledger


    Governor Corzine signed a bill in July which will allow New Jerseyans in November to vote for bond authorization for Green Acres funding.

    A coalition of environmental and government groups today announced plans to canvas the state with a campaign war chest of hundreds of thousands of dollars and a base of 350,000 volunteers to support of a measure to raise $200 million for open space preservation.

    Calling themselves the "Keep It Green Campaign," the coalition of more than 90 organizations promised to blanket the state with mailings, radio ads and phone banks in support of Ballot Question No. 3 on the Nov. 6 ballot.

    The question would authorize the state to borrow $200 million to continue operating the existing Green Acres and farmland preservation programs, and it would bankroll historic preservation projects, park development and the acquisition of homes and businesses in flood-prone areas.

    "We're running this campaign as if it were a person," Jeff Tittel, New Jersey Chapter Director of the Sierra Club, said at a press conference announcing the new campaign at the Statehouse this morning. "We want this to pass by one of the largest margins in state history."

    Supporters say the new funding is vital to maintaining an open space preservation program until lawmakers can devise a permanent source of funding for the program from annual state budget revenues.

    Information on the campaign can be found at their web site: http://www.outdoorrecreationalliance.com/kig.htm.

  14. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by OmegaNYC View Post
    ^^^



    just let me know when ya ready!
    AWESOME

  15. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCMAN320 View Post
    Coalition campaigns for open space preservation

    by Dunstan McNichol Wednesday September 19, 2007, 1:17 PM


    Amanda Brown/The Star-Ledger


    Governor Corzine signed a bill in July which will allow New Jerseyans in November to vote for bond authorization for Green Acres funding.

    A coalition of environmental and government groups today announced plans to canvas the state with a campaign war chest of hundreds of thousands of dollars and a base of 350,000 volunteers to support of a measure to raise $200 million for open space preservation.

    Calling themselves the "Keep It Green Campaign," the coalition of more than 90 organizations promised to blanket the state with mailings, radio ads and phone banks in support of Ballot Question No. 3 on the Nov. 6 ballot.

    The question would authorize the state to borrow $200 million to continue operating the existing Green Acres and farmland preservation programs, and it would bankroll historic preservation projects, park development and the acquisition of homes and businesses in flood-prone areas.

    "We're running this campaign as if it were a person," Jeff Tittel, New Jersey Chapter Director of the Sierra Club, said at a press conference announcing the new campaign at the Statehouse this morning. "We want this to pass by one of the largest margins in state history."

    Supporters say the new funding is vital to maintaining an open space preservation program until lawmakers can devise a permanent source of funding for the program from annual state budget revenues.

    Information on the campaign can be found at their web site: http://www.outdoorrecreationalliance.com/kig.htm.
    Oh the irony, on the one hand, NJ could definitely use more green space and slowdown of suburban sprawl. On the other hand, these preservation programs cost money...and we AALLLL know about the debt.
    Does Corzine still want to borrow for the stem cell centers? just curious

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