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Thread: Hoboken

  1. #61
    The Dude Abides
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    Rendering of the hotel from the same article:


  2. #62
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    I was by the W Hotel site in Hoboken today. It looks like they are getting ready to do foundation work. There was also a sign up showing a rendering of the building there that will be next to the hotel. Thankfully, no pyramid on the top of it.

  3. #63
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimmyG
    I was by the W Hotel site in Hoboken today. It looks like they are getting ready to do foundation work. There was also a sign up showing a rendering of the building there that will be next to the hotel. Thankfully, no pyramid on the top of it.
    I walk by it twice a day on the way to and from work.

    They had two large stacks of things on the site for a while. I guess that was for surface consolidation/compaction, but I am not sure. Also, it looks like they have a bunch of standpipes and a few trial piers (probably site survey, checking blow count and water table levels).

    I just wish they would start already. It is just collecting garbage now.....

  4. #64

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    The most exciting culturally anchored, transit-based, mixed-use community in Hoboken’s hottest market is yours to call home.
    Immediately adjacent the 9th Street/Congress Street NJ Transit Light Rail Station and the core of Hoboken’s bourgeoning Northwest sub-market; Monroe Center is a luxury mixed-use development project with 435 condominiums, 125,000 square feet of retail, 1,120 parking spaces and the internationally renowned Monroe Center for the Arts. Monroe Center offers city living with a softer edge™. Features include stunning views of NYC, an emphasis on the arts, ample open space, rooftop gardens, a sense of community, and the charm of Hoboken.


    ABOUT TO BREAK GROUND? The developers of the Monroe Center believe that their artist friendly and transit-accessible project will attract area home buyers.

    Monroe Center Development, LLC is ready to break ground on Jan. 27 on a high-rise condominium tower at 800 Monroe St.
    This will ultimately be part of a 435-unit development on a 5.5-acre site just steps from the Ninth Street stop of the Hudson Bergen Light Rail.

    Not only is this one of the largest projects in the city, it is also one of the most ambitious. Just a decade ago the city's west side was filled with blighted and underutilized properties. But with Hoboken's real estate boom, and the western alignment of the Hudson Bergen Light Rail, the conditions were right for construction.
    The developers hope to create a mixed use transit village, with condos, restaurants and shopping, while supporting and bolstering the local artist community.

    Nuts and bolts

    When completed, the Monroe Center project, which will be built between Seventh and Ninth streets on Monroe and Jackson streets, will include four high-rise residential buildings of between 10 and 13 stories, with ground floor retail, commercial arts space, and mezzanine space. The residential component will be built in several phases.
    On Jan. 27, the developers are scheduled to break ground on the 123 unit tower at 800 Monroe St. This building will take between 16 and 18 months to complete, said the developers.

    In addition, two former industrial buildings at 700 Monroe St. which house the Monroe Center for the Arts' office and loft spaces, theaters and galleries, are being completely renovated.
    The total project also will include be 125,000 square feet of retail space.
    Dil Hoda, the managing partner of the development team, added that he is looking forward to finally starting construction. "When we started out, many people this property was really far out on the west side of the city," Hoda said. "But now it's an area that is blossoming."

    Artists and small businesses

    Already underway is the renovation of the interior of the existing Monroe Center for the Arts at 720 Monroe St. Since opening in 1990, the converted Levelor Blinds Factory has maintained an eclectic mixture of businesses that now include ad agencies, interior designers, cake bakers, architects, toy makers, dance instructors, and yoga studios.
    Over the years, the Monroe Center has gained the reputation for attracting some of the city's best artists and most innovative small businesses and entrepreneurs.

    Currently, 95 percent of the 110,000 square feet of office space located within the center is being leased by 70 artists and 130 small businesses.

    Hoda said that featuring the artists will helps everyone involved. "[The condo owners] will have full access to all of these services. Imagine being able to walk next door to take lessons from a Julliard-trained musician, or take a pottery or dance class. But the artists also benefit because they have a new customer base just steps way," Hoda said.

    The new construction of the project will also include seven new artist work and live loft spaces, a two-screen independent movie theater, and a public open area with outdoor performance space.
    An 'urban transit village'

    Another selling point, said Hoda, is the project's location. Hoda said that because of the property's proximity to the light rail, this project will be a good example of the "smart growth" principle of a "transit friendly community."
    A transit village is a state-promoted planning initiative to redevelop and revitalize communities around transit facilities, making them appealing choices for people to live in, while lessening their reliance on cars.
    More than required parking

    In Hoboken, parking is always an issue, and this is one of the few projects that will provide more parking spaces than the zoning requires. When fully built out, the project will have 1,120 garage parking spaces to complement the surrounding off-street parking.

    Park space

    According to the developers, outdoor areas at Monroe Center will include one large plaza with stylistic fountains, seating decks and a "hammock park." Each new building at the community will also feature rooftop gardens. "Monroe Center's appeal as a destination will be enhanced by its substantial outdoor public areas," points out Gerard Saddel, a partner of Monroe Center Development, LLC. "A series of public parks and a plaza will be scattered throughout the entire development."
    According to the developers, condominiums will run between $450,000 and $1.5 million, and they expect to have a Web site and sales office open in the next month or so.

  5. #65
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    This is where Hoboken fails to be a good neighbor and becomes pig headed and self-centred. Those towers better not be taller than the Palisades of the JC Heights above. JC has been trying to fight these stupid towers and Hobokens pompus mayor shurggs us off. Hoboken already f'd around with us with the those ugly towers near the 2nd Street Light-Rail station (which is in JC not Hoboken, they just try to make it their own, same as the 9th/Congress St. Lightrail station but atleast they included the Heights St. where the elevator goes to). Hoboken has some nerve they are not good neighbors at all. Again JC is still fighting to get those towers lower than the Palisades if they aren't already.

  6. #66

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    Sorry JCman I have to disagree with you why should people in the Heights be guaranteed views of NY. Alot of people in Downtown JC had views of NY before they started building 40 to 50 storey buildings. If it's any body being pigheaded it's people from the Heights. Think of the people who are going to buy at Trump Plaza who are paying 1mil + for their great views. Who don't know if Harborside 7 is built their views are gone no one is guranteed a view.

  7. #67
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by macmini
    Sorry JCman I have to disagree with you why should people in the Heights be guaranteed views of NY. Alot of people in Downtown JC had views of NY before they started building 40 to 50 storey buildings. If it's any body being pigheaded it's people from the Heights. Think of the people who are going to buy at Trump Plaza who are paying 1mil + for their great views. Who don't know if Harborside 7 is built their views are gone no one is guranteed a view.
    I partially agree with both of you on this.

    I hate the "great wall of Hoboken" that is being built along River/Sinatra/Whatever they want to call it today, but at the same time, they have been doing this for a while on a lot of projects.

    Also, somehow Hoboken should be the one made to feel guilty about building up when places like the Galaxy, the Doric and other multistory high rises have already been built OVER the edge of the Pallisades, blocking EVERYONE'S view behind them?

    I do agree that they should try to keep hoboken's skyline below the pallisades if for one reason, keeping them visible to all, rather than building up. But calling Hoboken pompous while downtown JC is trying to be the next Downtown Brooklyn, especially with high rises built ON the water, is not exactly fair.

  8. #68
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Mac they shouldn't be sacrificed up there. What the hell did they do. That view has been there for centuries. The Palisades have been there since prehistoric times and the Heights has grown there over hundred years. So just because they are up there and "out of the way" that they should be spurned, I think not. I undertsand with Downtown but if you know anything about JC history where all those highrises were were rail yards and terminals and warehouses. So the people may have had the view from Grove and Newark, but they couldn't even get to the waters edge with out risking their lives. The waterfront has always been a reflection of the national economy. Back in the day it was industrial and in todays worlds it service jobs.

    Ninja the highrises aren't built ON the water as you put it, they are built on the land that was once occupied by railyards and factories. Long Island City is starting down the same course as we did. When we were building it was building up a new economy when our city was in crisis and it just snowballed. I'm not saying Hoboken can't have a skyline, it think it's awesome. But right at the base of the Palisades is pushing the limit. I also agree that Guttenburg and West New York ruined their section of the Palisades.

  9. #69
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    I am talking about that monolith right at waters edge.

    If that is not on the water, I do not know how you could get any closer without pontoons.

    And yes, I have also worked on the design of several of the buildings that have gone up ON the piers, so I know what "on the woter" means literally.

    Also, it still does not address the Doric, or the one building a bit further up, or the Galaxy, all high rises built not only on the edge of teh pallisades, but over them, constructing ugly scaffolding all over the side.

    And then there are the popcorn condos going up all over the waterfront which do not block the view of the pallisades, but do mar their original stark profile.

    I guess what I am saying JC is try not to demonize any one municipality. That never gets things done and only starts a fight.

  10. #70
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Yea i agree the Dorifc and Galaxy and Troy towers suck. I still long for the day that they get torn down. I hear ya us Jerseyans especially in Hudson County have to stick together.

  11. #71
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    Default Hoboken to Vote on Condemning Factory

    I hope the city council votes against using eminent domain on this factory. Aside from all the arguments for/against this type of eminent domain, Hoboken doesn't really need another block of apartments that will probably be exactly the same as all the other buildings put up on the west side of town.

    Hoboken factory sits in city's crosshairs


    HOBOKEN - D. Kwitman & Son is one of the last vestiges of the Mile Square City's industrial past.
    But the factory - which has produced drapes and other home furnishings for the past 23 years - may soon be on its way out as the City Council is expected to vote tonight on whether to use the power of eminent domain to take the property, as well as a neighboring self-storage facility, and turn it over to condominium developer Ursa/Tarragon.
    The Kwitman factory sits on a quiet cobblestone stretch of Grand Street near 10th Street in what was once an area of vacant and abandoned factories and warehouses.

    In 1998, a 20-block area that included the old factory was condemned and slated for redevelopment by Ursa/Tarragon, which aims to build a six-story, 150-unit building with one level of parking. In return, the developer offered givebacks including open space, a supermarket, 200 units of affordable housing and a community center and swimming pool.
    City officials say they have no choice but to honor the deal or face mounting legal challenges.

    "This was not the dream of the developers; this was the dream of a community advisory panel," said Councilman Michael Cricco. "The agreement was done in 1998 and the town already appreciated the reward from the plan."

    But some area residents say what seemed like a no-brainer a decade ago now has to be rethought given Hoboken's red-hot real estate market.
    "This area is hardly in need of economic development," said Thomas Pini, a Grand Street resident who blasted the city's plan at a public meeting held last week. "I have a great problem with two viable businesses being seized by the government and turned over to developers."

    Harold Kwitman, whose family has owned the business for 70 years, said if he's forced to sell, he will likely reopen in another location. However, he doesn't know where or when, and he worries some of his several dozen employees won't be able to follow him.

    "The government and real estate developers are in a close relationship, and unfortunately this is the way it is," Kwitman said.

  12. #72
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    ONE parking level?

    What frigging planet are they coming from?

    They need at least 2 if you have 6 floors of residential above it!!!!


    hell, I am in favor of developing these things, but you have to make sure that it does not make life harder for everyone else around it just because the developers are too greedy to build a functional attractive living space!

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    Originally Posted by Ninjahedge: They need at least 2 if you have 6 floors of residential above it!!!!
    I think the six floors listed in the article includes the parking level (1 level of parking, 5 of housing). That would match the design of the other buildings in the area.

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    Hoboken Council greenlights seizure of two businesses



    Friday, March 03, 2006 By BONNIE FRIEDMAN

    JOURNAL STAFF WRITER
    HOBOKEN - The City Council introduced an ordinance Wednesday to use eminent domain to seize two businesses on Grand Street and turn them over to a condominium developer, angering area residents who say the 150-unit building will destroy the character of the block.

    "We purchased the condo specifically because it's a quiet neighborhood," said Maxie Plant, who lives across the street from the two properties. "By constructing a massive complex, it will extremely alter the character of the neighborhood."

    The two properties - a factory and a self-storage facility - sit in the Northwest Redevelopment Zone, a 20-block area that runs from Seventh Street at the western edge of the city to the 14th Street Viaduct. In 1998, when the city approved the redevelopment plan, the area was overrun with vacant factories and warehouses.
    Eight years later, the northern part of the city is rife with development, leaving many to wonder how the city can justify taking the property for the economic good of the city.
    "We do understand that the plan was put into place eight years ago," said Grand Street resident Rick Hemmer. "We appreciate that fact, but things have changed."

    City officials say they have no choice but to honor the redevelopment plan because the city has already realized benefits from the developer, Ursa/Tarragon.

    In exchange for redevelopment rights to several parcels within the district, Ursa/Tarragon offered give-backs, including 200 units of affordable housing, open space, and a supermarket. The developers have also promised to build a community center and a swimming pool.

    "It would be easy to say, 'let's not do it,'" said Councilman Michael Cricco. "But we are trying to do something right, and to do that we have to follow through with the process."

    Stuart Deutsch, the dean of Rutgers Law School-Newark, said the law does not specifically address how long a redevelopment plan can remain in place.
    "That is one of the questions unanswered in Kelo," said Deutsch, referring to the recent Supreme Court case that reaffirmed the government's right to hand over private property to developers as long as it provides for the public good.

    Mark Settembre, a principal of Ursa/Tarragon, tried to allay residents' concerns at a meeting last week, promising to keep the style of the building in line with the architecture of the neighborhood and to preserve the cobblestone streets and trees.

    "We have no problem designing it like a factory building," Settembre said. "But the buildings have to come down. This is part of a contract we made with the city and we have to fulfill it."

    While all nine council members voted to introduce the ordinance, Councilman Peter Cammarano said his mind is not yet made up.
    "I have concerns at the general level about the city using its eminent domain power to accomplish what we are trying to accomplish here," Cammarano said. "I am sympathetic to business owners who don't want to go out of business. I can't say we are not listening to their concerns."

    Harold Kwitman, owner of D. Kwitman and Son, which has manufactured drapes and home furnishings in Hoboken for 23 years, said he does not want to relocate his business, which employs several dozen workers.
    "I'm not thrilled," he said. "The cost to move is expensive and the cost to find a new place is expensive. I own the property outright and I can't even develop it myself. I can only sell it to one person."

  15. #75
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimmyG
    I think the six floors listed in the article includes the parking level (1 level of parking, 5 of housing). That would match the design of the other buildings in the area.
    Tim, I live there.

    The other buildings in the area made the parking situation worse, not better.

    Therefore, they should be building places, especially LARGE places, with more parking capacity than the TOTAL anticipated resident load. (IOW, Hoboken is filled with people between 25 and 40 years old. A lot of them meet someone and move in together in this area before they move out. Most have cars. So even a 1 unit to 1 parking space ratio is not enough. But I believe the current ratio required for building is some small 1 for every 2 or something similar.)

    So the current regulations, and current building scheme does not work, therefore it should not be used as the standard for other structures being built in the area.

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