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Thread: Jersey City Rising

  1. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCMAN320
    Nice one. Hey say what you want ok, I'm just tired of someone always bashing Jersey City to make kind of pathetic point that Manhattan is the end all to be all.
    This is WiredNewYork.com, it is not WiredJerseyCity.com. There is a common thread running through out this site that connects all the forum members - a love and appreciation of New York. If you're sick of hearing about New York or comparisons between Jersey City and New York, why not go to a site dedicated to Jersey City. You're acting like a person who hates apple trees, but hangs out all day in an orchard.

  2. #137
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Nicely put. Listen I repsect all of your opinons I'm just gonna leave it at that befoe this gets too ugly. Also just one last thing, I just don't understand why some people have to go out and pick apart a city that has come a very very long way and has achieved so much. I would just like someone to give us some repsect thats all. I'm not yelling or nothin I just would like to know why.

  3. #138
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    How was Jersey City picked apart or bashed in any way? If anything I was turning attention towards Jersey City, wondering what everyone thought of the new lights on that building - that's all. We critique buildings in New York too.

    So no hard feelings - let's move on.

    In fact, the Jersey City skyline looks fantastic now, especially at sunset. I'm ready for another tower to rise over there. What are the best prospects? Anyone?

  4. #139
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Your right I would like to apologize my pride sometimes gets the better of me. Sorry

  5. #140
    Senior Member Dynamicdezzy's Avatar
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    now that theres a sense of harmony.... I dont think Jersey city is a threat at all. on the contrary it helps NYC stay on its toes. i just always had the illusion that NYC and Northern Jersey could work more closely together. If the NY-NJ metro area worked together it could probably function better. What other cities have tried such a thing?? Looking at Jersey City (the financial district), DownTown Brooklyn, and Lower manhattan they are all so close to eachother, practically pointing at one another. It would be wonderful to one day see a skyline in combination of the three. something that would be nice to have would be a modernized subway (monorail??? or maglev>>might be out of the question) between NYC and Hudson County, maybe even With Newark.

  6. #141
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    The PATH is looking to expand its pilot of testing their readers that accept both MTA Metrocards and PATH Quickcards.

    As far as harmony... They all affect each other like it or not. A significant portion of the NYC workforce lives in NJ (I think I read it was about 1/3), likewise a growing number of people that live in NYC work in Hoboken and JC. Whether it is through healthy competition, joint projects like the freight tunnel, or companies locating data centers in disbursed locations throughout the metropolitan area, they all help and affect one another. They share the same airports, waterways, rail lines and highway systems and work together very nicely. I am more concerned about loosing business to other metropolitan areas and overseas than I am within the same community. Our transportation system is such that no matter whether a job is located in Brooklyn, LIC, JC or Newark, I will have no problem getting there; I will still pay taxes to one state, and my payroll taxes and income I generate for the company will be paid in another.

  7. #142

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dynamicdezzy
    now that theres a sense of harmony.... I dont think Jersey city is a threat at all. on the contrary it helps NYC stay on its toes. i just always had the illusion that NYC and Northern Jersey could work more closely together. If the NY-NJ metro area worked together it could probably function better. What other cities have tried such a thing?? Looking at Jersey City (the financial district), DownTown Brooklyn, and Lower manhattan they are all so close to eachother, practically pointing at one another. It would be wonderful to one day see a skyline in combination of the three. something that would be nice to have would be a modernized subway (monorail??? or maglev>>might be out of the question) between NYC and Hudson County, maybe even With Newark.
    True. If Newark would enter this connection better, who knows what growth would happen thought the area. Newark has a huge airport and harbor. Newark should get in

  8. #143
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    Newark is connected by PATH and NJ Transit/Amtrack. The airport and harbor are part of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

  9. #144

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    o. i did not know that. thanks for informing me about it.

  10. #145
    Senior Member Dynamicdezzy's Avatar
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    I ment in terms of: "let me take the "10" train from LIC to down town newark, or takin the "Y" train from downtown brooklyn to Jersey City and St. George Terminal." I always thought they would make the subway run over hudson county and down to staten island from manhattan and also from brooklyn. I would hate to live in SI.

  11. #146
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Greenway Trail leads to Powerhouse Arts District

    Thursday, November 18, 2004

    By Bonnie Friedman
    Journal staff writer

    Art lovers and outdoor enthusiasts toured the newly-designated Powerhouse Arts District Sunday afternoon, one of several weekend activities designed to coincide with the East Coast Greenway Alliance's seventh annual meeting held last week in Jersey City.

    Joshua Parkhurst, vice president of the Jersey City Landmarks Conservancy, took tour-goers on a walk through the many 19th- and early 20th-century warehouses that have come to define the district.

    "The Greenway is not just a trail," Parkhurst said. "The idea is that it leads to neighborhoods."

    The East Coast Greenway Alliance is a non-profit organization working to build a 2,600-mile off-road trail stretching from the Canadian border of Maine to Key West, Fla.

    Rita Finstein, a resident of New Brunswick and a member of the Union County hiking club, spent the weekend exploring the Brennan Court House, the Paulus Hook neighborhood and the Powerhouse Arts District.

    "I knew Jersey City was changing but I didn't realize how attractive it's become," Finstein said. "Some of the new buildings really conform in style to the historic neighborhood."

    The tour included stops at the A&P, one of the first buildings constructed with reinforced concrete; Butler Brothers, the largest building in the six-block zone; and the embattled 111 First St., a former tobacco factory where some 70 artists continue to rent studio spaces despite ongoing disputes with their landlord.

    Estella Haferling, a New York City resident and member of the Society for Industrial Archeology, said she is considering moving across the river after taking the tour.

    "I love this stuff," Haferling said. "It's like 'Brave New World'. These structures are my love."

  12. #147
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    Stepping Out of Manhattan's Shadow
    By JENNIE GREEN

    Published: November 21, 2004

    Phil Mansfield for The New York Times

    Yes, there is a Starbucks in Jersey City. But there's only one, directly across the street from the Pavonia/Newport PATH Station in the glimmering heart of a revived Hudson River Waterfront, whose glass-plated office towers and luxury high-rises stand proud and tall; these days not so much in the shadow of Manhattan's famous skyline but rather as a kind of graceful western extension.

    Yet coffee aficionados need not worry, as a variety of tasty brews can be found around town. The Hard Grove Cafe on Grove Street, for example, is a Cuban-American diner with gold foil palm trees that serves café con leche rich and piping hot.

    The aggressive development of Jersey City's waterfront and downtown districts that began roughly a dozen years ago, after a false start during the 1980's, has resulted in what some might refer to as an urban renewal of legendary proportion. But that didn't stop Julie Kaufman, who has lived in Jersey City since 1988, from recalling the bad old days: "First of all, Exchange Place didn't exist," she said, referring to a new PATH station in the city's financial center. "And the Pavonia/Newport PATH station was a total wasteland that you didn't walk across; you ran. There were hookers on the streets and drug deals going down right out in the open."

    Despite a vigorous and successful campaign by developers and city officials to "put Jersey City on the map," many people, including New Yorkers who live only a few miles away, continue to have little sense of the place.

    Sure, the Goldman Sachs building, Harborside Financial Center Plaza and the Newport development can be seen from the west side of Manhattan, but the glitzy new buildings in the waterfront area, built first to accommodate dot-com companies and then back-office divisions of major financial institutions, are merely the tip of the iceberg.

    Jersey City is as sprawling as it is diverse, and the fact that some real estate agents have taken to calling it "the sixth borough" is not entirely accidental. Like Brooklyn, Jersey City is huge and encompassing of many neighborhoods, or sections, each of which has developed a particular character over time.

    Historic downtown, for example, is not only within walking distance of the newly gentrified waterfront, it is also home to a significant portion of the city's brownstone row houses, which were built around Van Vorst Park and Hamilton Park at the end of the 19th century. Jersey City's downtown and waterfront were the areas most ravaged by poverty and decay during the decades after World War II. Yet these areas were the first to be remade.

    "At any point during the 1970's you could have bought a whole side of Van Vorst Park for $100,000," said Dan Frohwirth, director of real estate for the Jersey City Economic Development Corporation, a nonprofit organization that functions as a liaison between developers and the city. "Now you're going to pay over a million for a house with recessed lights and a Sub-Zero refrigerator."

    In contrast, Jersey City Heights is a densely populated residential neighborhood in the northernmost part of the city. Most of the Heights housing consists of detached two-family dwellings, with some low- to mid-rise apartment buildings. Greenville, on the southern tip of the city, has single-family houses built in the early 1900's, and the Country Village development, which comprises two-family detached and attached houses built in the early 1960's.

    The newest development in western Greenville is an exclusive waterfront community called Port Liberté, which has become increasingly popular among affluent families.

    And this is only the beginning. Also within Jersey City is the Martin Luther King Bergen/Lafayette neighborhood, a notoriously decrepit underclass stronghold that has suddenly turned up-and-coming because of its desirable brownstone row houses and proximity to downtown Manhattan via the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit. And Journal Square has recently become a focal point for commercial and residential developers, largely because of its precious PATH station.

    Michael Berney, an agent at Liberty Realty, which started in Hoboken and expanded to downtown Jersey City three years ago, said: "Jersey City is so hot right now with the waterfront and downtown basically finished, that a natural expansion has occurred. Potential buyers who previously wouldn't consider anything outside of Hoboken are now more than open to Jersey City."

    Checking the latest Hudson County Multiple Listing Service report, he continued: "There's been a 17.69 percent average price increase on all sales in Hudson County between 2003 and 2004. Year to date, the number of closed sales has also gone up 27.5 percent. Suddenly there are bidding wars."

    In Jersey City, where the real estate market is inexorably linked with the New York market, three features that most frequently attract urban home buyers are square footage, parking and outdoor space. At the upper end of the Jersey City market ($750,000 to $1.5 million), a buyer may purchase a downtown brownstone in good to mint condition, or a spacious condominium in a luxurious waterfront building with countless amenities. One such apartment that recently hit the market for $1.25 million is a 1,667-square-foot penthouse with an additional 1,500 square feet of private rooftop terrace space in a Washington Street building called the Sugar House.

    Many choices also exist in the $300,000 to $600,000 range. One is a two-family house in Jersey City Heights for $440,000, with an annual property tax bill of $5,103.

    Despite the fact that much Jersey City property has doubled in value since 1994, first-time home buyers need not be discouraged. According to a recent Multiple Listing Service report, there were a total of 115 available properties for less than $200,000 apiece in all of Jersey City. Most of these were one- and two-family houses in Greenville and Journal Square, one-family houses in Bergen/Lafayette and Jersey City Heights, and mostly one-bedroom but some two-bedroom condominiums all around town.

    For families, the biggest question about Jersey City can be said in a word: schools. Like systems in other densely populated urban areas, this one has a history of being strained by overcrowding, underfunding, high dropout rates and a multitude of other problems faced by districts that serve large numbers of disadvantaged children. Evidence can be found in the 2002-03 district SAT scores of 413 for math and 392 for verbal, compared with statewide averages of 518 and 500, respectively.

    But there are options. Between Jersey City and neighboring Hoboken there are at least four charter schools (Grades kindergarten through 8), three private schools (Cornerstone School in Jersey City and Stevens Cooperative School and Mustard Seed School, both in Hoboken) and too many parochial schools to count.

    Ms. Kaufman sends her children to the Learning Community Charter School, a public school on Grand Street in Jersey City. "The classes are small and the child-centered Bank Street method of education they use is really effective," Ms. Kaufman said. "Already, our third and fourth graders have tested above the statewide average."

    Jersey City is booming, but that doesn't mean it's a panacea. Jersey City property taxes run higher than New York City's, and some of the land remains polluted by obsolete manufacturing plants. Also, the place is too rambling for one pulsating hub like Washington Street in Hoboken or Seventh Avenue in Park Slope to emerge.

    Stephen Becker, who is 36 and single and has lived within walking distance of his waterfront office and the Grove Street PATH station for 10 years, has recently become the happy beneficiary of sushi restaurants, upscale bars and chain retailers like Pier 1 and Target.

    Still, when asked where in Jersey City he likes to go out for an evening of socializing or entertainment, Mr. Becker, who works for EquiServe replied, "Manhattan or Hoboken."

    At the same time, old neighborhoods have started to gel in new ways. Ms. Kaufman, who never expected to stay in Jersey City for the long haul of family life, can't imagine living anywhere else. "Both of my children," she said, "know every single person who lives on our block.''

  13. #148
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Jersey City mulls partnership in Bergen-Lafayette
    Partnership mulled for Morris Canal area

    Monday, November 29, 2004

    By Molly Bloom
    Journal staff writer

    An innovative partnership between a developer and a community association could bring a $25 million residential and commercial project to Jersey City's Bergen-Lafayette neighborhood.

    The proposal would give the community group, the nonprofit Morris Canal Redevelopment Area Community Development Corp., funding for the creation of neighborhood programs, as well as a say in the project, with the opportunity to provide input into the planning process.

    The Jersey City Redevelopment Authority voted Tuesday to consider approving the $4.5 million partnership between the Morris Canal group and Landmark Developers. The JCRA will vote on approving the partnership at its Dec. 21 meeting.

    Under the proposal, Landmark Developers of Jersey City would spend up to $4.5 million to buy and perform an environmental cleanup on the property at 100 Monitor St., which is currently owned by the JCRA. Any leftover funds - perhaps as much as $1 million - would then go to the Morris Canal association to fund community programs, said Ted Rosen, the organization's attorney.

    Landmark Developers would then redevelop the property at 100 Monitor St. as well as other properties it already owns at 317-319 Pacific Ave. and 406-420 Communipaw Ave. The proposed developments would include both residential and commercial space, with 57 of the approximately 197 units designated for affordable housing, said Frank Cretella, president of Landmark Developers.

    For the Morris Canal community corporation, the agreement is a triumph for a group that has often felt sidelined from redevelopment decisions. "This deal is unique in that it puts the community in control," said Leonard Joseph, a Morris Canal community corporation board member. "It lifts the burden of the city to always meet the needs of the citizens or the community groups."

    However, the proposal isn't a done deal yet. At Tuesday's meeting, JCRA board member and City Councilman Steve Lipski questioned whether there was a "conflict of interest" in the Morris Canal community corporation recommending a development deal that would benefit the corporation financially.

    "The incentive for the Morris Canal group is not strictly based on the project itself as much as it is to generate capital for their own nonprofit," he said.

    Though the Landmark proposal does not differ substantially from previous proposals, the up-front cash component was a significant part for the Morris Canal's community corporation's acceptance of it, Morris Canal community corporation officials said.

    Lipski requested that the Morris Canal community corporation present the JCRA board with precedents for the type of development agreement proposed. He also questioned the Morris Canal community corporation's ability to oversee a complex development agreement.

    "What authority . does a nonprofit organization have in determining a developer? Do they have the resources to monitor the quality and effectiveness of bringing a project to fruition?" Lipski asked.

    Joseph said that the corporation was well-prepared to handle the proposed project. "We have gained so much in terms of learning as we're doing," he said. "We know what residents in the community want. . If we're given the opportunity and tools and access to the process, we can't go any more wrong than the city."

    The Abyssinian Baptist Church has also successfully undertaken similar community development projects in Harlem under the leadership of Reverend Dr. Calvin O. Butts III, Joseph said.

    "Change scares people," Joseph said. "But we're definitely not reinventing the wheel. We're just bringing the wheel to Jersey City

  14. #149
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    Residences at Liberty

    Mmmmmm


    http://www.nbbj.com/whatwedo/markets/mixeduse/


  15. #150
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    The Phoenix and The Excelsior

    http://www.arquitectonica.com/flash.htm

    >projects > mixed use > Phoenix&Excelsior

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