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Thread: Jersey City Rising

  1. #5041
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up 312 Pacific Ave. New Infill

    GothamWest’s New Infill Project at 312 Pacific Avenue
    By Darrell Simmons - February 18, 2016


    312 Pacific Ave Rendering from Scott Mahaffey Architect

    GothamWest has another approved project in the works that they’re planning to begin construction on this spring. The Scott Mahaffey designed building at 312 Pacific Ave in Bergen-Layfatte will contain 14 residential units above ground floor commercial space.

    The amount of detail that goes into these designs is always fascinating. As Scott Mahaffey explains,

    “The apartments are all two bedrooms, with large windows in projecting bays that will provide lots of daylight into the units. The bays are placed to help the building fit the smaller-scale rhythm of it’s neighbors. Attention is paid to the materials, window size and placement to relate the street elevation to the historic fabric in this up and coming neighborhood.”

    Currently, 312 Pacific is a vacant lot. This new project with fill in the vacancy and restore the continuity of the streetscape.

    Although not a huge project, it’s a sign of the continued interest in Bergen-Layfayette as development spreads out from downtown. With the Baker Building finishing up construction, the Grind Shop‘s recent opening and now new infill residential projects, Pacific Ave is shaping up to become a hot corridor.

    http://jerseydigs.com/gothamwests-ne...acific-avenue/

  2. #5042

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    Quote Originally Posted by msands7 View Post
    Post on 54 Bright Street; 4-unit luxury condo building:

    http://www.mattsandelands.com/#!Hist...f20a08ed0a7054
    This has also been covered on New York Yimby and JerseyDigs today

  3. #5043
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Hudson County Leads NJ in Population Growth

    These N.J. counties experienced the highest population growth
    By Eric Strauss, March 24, 2016 at 10:27 AM

    Jersey City must be doing something right. The U.S. Census Bureau has released its population growth figures for 2015, and Hudson County showed the largest percentage gain among New Jersey's counties, adding 0.8 of a percent in population.

    Bergen County, the state’s most populous county, actually added the largest number of people from July 2014 to July 2015, with a gain of 5,670, to 938,506 residents, but its percentage growth of 0.6 of a percent was only good for second.

    Hudson County grew by 5,334 people, to 674,836.

    At the other end of the scale, Sussex County ranked last among the state's 21 counties, losing 0.9 of a percent of its population.

    The state as a whole grew 0.2 of a percent, to 8,988,013 residents as of July 1, 2015, the Census Bureau said.

    By way of comparison, the nation’s fastest-growing county was McKenzie County, North Dakota, which grew 16.7 percent.

    Here are the county-by-county results, in order of percentage gain/loss:

    -------------------------------

    * Hudson County: 674,836 residents, up 5,334 or 0.8 of a percent;

    * Bergen County: 938,506 residents, up 5,670 or 0.6 of a percent;

    * Union County: 555,786 residents, up 2,737 or 0.5 of a percent;

    * Ocean County: 585,916 residents, up 2,805 or 0.5 of a percent;

    * Middlesex County: 840,900 residents, up 3,561 or 0.4 of a percent;

    * Essex County: 797,434 residents, up 2,472 or 0.3 of a percent;

    * Somerset County: 333,654 residents, up 1,020 or 0.3 of a percent;

    * Gloucester County: 291,479 residents, up 581 or 0.2 of a percent;

    * Passaic County: 510,916 residents, up 1,003 or 0.2 of a percent;

    * Morris County: 499,509 residents, up 273 or 0.1 of a percent;

    * Warren County: 106,869 residents, up 14 or break-even;

    * Camden County: 510,923 residents, down 44 or break-even;

    * Monmouth County: 628,715 residents, down 303 or break-even;

    * Mercer County: 371,398 residents, down 203, or 0.1 of a percent;

    * Burlington County: 450,226 residents, down 451 or 0.1 of a percent;

    * Hunterdon County: 125,488 residents, down 322 or 0.3 of a percent;

    * Atlantic County: 274,219 residents, down 1,280 or 0.5 of a percent;

    * Cape May County: 94,727 residents, down 632 or 0.7 of a percent;

    * Salem County: 64,180 residents, down 490 or 0.8 of a percent;

    * Cumberland County: 155,854 residents, down 1,245 or 0.8 of a percent;

    * Sussex County: 143,673 residents, down 1,331 or 0.9 of a percent.

    For more information on the Census Bureau's population data, click here: http://www.census.gov/popest/estimates.html

    http://www.njbiz.com/article/2016032...ulation-growth

    Numbers for Jersey City and Newark have not yet been released.
    Last edited by JCMAN320; March 30th, 2016 at 09:33 AM.

  4. #5044

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    That's great to see, but I would venture a guess that Newark and Jersey City both were the biggest growing municipalities within their counties.

  5. #5045

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    That is most likely the case. The fast growing counties all have major cities or clusters of smaller cities that are growing quickly. Essex County has Newark and the Oranges. Hudson County has Jersey City and Hoboken, as well as Harrison and Union City/West New York. Union County has Elizabeth and a few suburbs are growing. Ocean County has Lakewood, which is growing RAPIDLY. Most of the others are majority suburban sprawl which is starting to become less popular or affordable.

  6. #5046
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Hudson County Leads in Immigrants Making Their Homes in NJ

    Quote Originally Posted by towerpower123 View Post
    That is most likely the case. The fast growing counties all have major cities or clusters of smaller cities that are growing quickly. Essex County has Newark and the Oranges. Hudson County has Jersey City and Hoboken, as well as Harrison and Union City/West New York. Union County has Elizabeth and a few suburbs are growing. Ocean County has Lakewood, which is growing RAPIDLY. Most of the others are majority suburban sprawl which is starting to become less popular or affordable.
    The suburban lifestyle is slowly becoming obsolete but will never totally disappear. The fact that many of NJ's urban centers are growing is a very positive statistic for New Jersey as it protects the great natural resources of NJ and moves NJ to a more sustainable future.

    In other demographic news, Hudson County along with Jersey City are also the leaders in New Jersey since 2010 of immigrants that have moved here.

    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=


    THE LIST: NEW JERSEY COUNTIES WITH THE HIGHEST IMMIGRANT POPULATIONS
    COLLEEN O'DEA | MARCH 28, 2016

    The foreign-born contribute in myriad ways to the Garden State, including counterbalancing the number of folks who move away each year. New Jersey's population continues to inch toward 9 million, driven in part by the more than 50,000 immigrants who settle in the state each year.

    The latest estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau put the state's population at almost 8.96 million people last year. That's about 20,000 higher than in 2014 and 166,000 more than the number who lived in the state in April 2010, when the previous official census was taken. Births are outpacing deaths by more than 30,000 a year, but between 40,000 and 60,000 people move out of state annually, so the influx of the foreign-born has been an important factor in New Jersey's population increases.

    These are the counties that took in the most immigrants in the first half of this decade and the number of the foreign-born who settled there between April 2010 and July 2015:

    1. Hudson County -- 52,065
    Long a haven for foreigners, dating back to the days when people came by ship into Ellis Island, Hudson County continues to be the New Jersey home of the most new arrivals in America. Census officials estimate that last year alone, nearly 11,000 immigrants made Hudson County their home, helping boost its population to nearly 675,000 and making it the fastest-growing county in the state.

    2. Middlesex County -- 41,929
    This urban Central Jersey county has a large Asian population -- nearly a quarter of the county's more than 840,000 residents are Asian. The largest group are Asian Indians. Middlesex's Asian Indian population is reportedly the third-largest in the nation, behind Santa Clara, CA, and Queens, NY.

    3. Bergen County -- 31,169
    New Jersey's most populous county also took in the third-largest number of immigrants since 2010. With nearly 940,000 residents, Bergen has a diverse population and a number of racial and ethnic enclaves -- for instance, Koreatown in Palisades Park, where nearly two-thirds of the population are immigrants.

    4. Essex County -- 29,493
    With nearly 800,000 residents, Essex is among the state's most urbanized. In most of its municipalities about three in 10 residents are foreign-born and in Belleville, more than a third are immigrants.

    5. Union County -- 20,754
    Union completes the link from Bergen to Middlesex and also has a sizeable immigrant population. Nearly half the population of Elizabeth, the county seat, was born in another country.

    6. Passaic County -- 19,716
    This county’s cities feature large immigrant populations -- a third in Paterson -- and municipalities where foreign-born population are growing significantly: Little Falls and Pompton Lakes have seen their immigrant populations increase by more than 75 percent since 2000.

    7. Mercer County -- 13,577
    Home of the state capital, Mercer's population of 371,000 is more than a quarter Asian or Latino. Princeton has the most immigrants -- about a quarter of the population.

    8. Morris County -- 11,733
    One of the state's wealthiest counties, Morris's foreign-born population has been rising and includes Hispanic enclaves in Morristown, Victory Gardens, and Dover, where nearly half the people are immigrants.

    9. Somerset County -- 9,261
    Another wealthy county, immigrants have been moving throughout the county in recent years, with most municipalities seeing their foreign-born populations rising by at least 40 percent since 2000.

    10. Atlantic County -- 8,527
    The southernmost county on the list, Atlantic is also the smallest, with a population of just under 275,000. Atlantic City has the most immigrants, but the ranks of the foreign-born are growing fast in several nearby municipalities.

    Click here for reuse options!
    Copyright 2014 NJ Spotlight


    http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/1...t-populations/

  7. #5047

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    The suburbs aren't going anywhere anytime soon, barring a sudden price shock of gas, but they are beginning to shrink as millennials favor the cities and retirees favor Florida

  8. #5048
    Forum Veteran West Hudson's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Condo Boom

    I couldn't help but notice alot of new projects on display on Marchetto/Higgins/Stieve Architecture website, and it looks like several of them are massive condo buildings. There's 75 Park Lane South in Newport (right next to the original two Newport towers from the late 80's), which will have 308 condo units and should be starting construction this year. And there are detailed renderings of Fields' U/C project in Paulus Hook. Also, although this one isn't in JC, there's also the design for K. Hov's project in Port Imperial, which has a stepped design. Check it out: http://mhsarchitects.com/in-progress/

  9. #5049

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    Montgomery Tower would have been amazing but it looks like it would be going in the area on Montgomery where that nondescript five story office park looking building and the larger 15 story office building that was recently refurbished are, where there was once talk those two properties were recently purchased for an eventual massive office/mixed use tower. Hopefully despite renovating the 15 story building(both located across the street from 101 Hudson) someday they will raze the smaller nothingburger complex and go big there.. it's at a perfect spot right by Exchange Place for a magnificent Lower Manhattan view. They also have that Baldwin Avenue project (two 25 story towers and two smaller ones replacing a massive Mueller pasta plant) as well as the large midrise near the Newport Mall. Very nice presentation, some really cool projects!

  10. #5050

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    Montgomery Tower? Where did that come from? I haven't seen anything on this site about it. Web site says 16 stories? Anybody know anything about this and how tall/stories will it be?

  11. #5051
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coralridge View Post
    Montgomery Tower? Where did that come from? I haven't seen anything on this site about it. Web site says 16 stories? Anybody know anything about this and how tall/stories will it be?
    It was proposed by Onyx, the company that owns the just recently just renovated 30 Montgomery Street. It's proposed for the site where 30 Montgomery is and the smaller PANYNJ office building. It was initially proposed back in 07 from the presentation video. Who knows if its still going to happen. Having Onyx just put a ton of money into renovating 30 Montgomery and promoting the building and two new retail spaces and PANYNJ putting in a new store front on Montgomery Street I don't see it happening anytime soon.

  12. #5052

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    It is listed on the architect's website as having a 2018 completion date.
    http://mhsarchitects.com/inprocess/montgomery-tower/

    The site plan has it replacing the taller portion of 30 Montgomery, which just underwent a significant renovation. Most of the mass is on the taller building's site while the low rise extension would largely be replaced by the glass atrium. I highly doubt it will happen now.

    75 Park Lane South is also a massive project at least 500 feet tall. Its site currently remains empty, and Google Maps curiously has it being in Hoboken while everything around it is in Jersey City...




    http://mhsarchitects.com/inprocess/75-park-lane-south/

  13. #5053

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    I like the first design better

  14. #5054

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    Me too... the second design looks like a more pedestrian version. The first one really looks appealing... really unique in style for Jersey City, really architecturally creative. While the second one isn't bad, shouldn't we aim more for "wow, that's in Jersey City?" to a "nice, but meh" kind of thinking? We're building higher, why not build better and make our skyline have a more distinct flair. Most of the buildings going up or built just don't stand out except for size. I like Journal Squared but if you're looking at the first tower from a distance it looks like a blander 432 Park knockoff.

    What is going on with the St. Peter's College partnered project near the Armory? a 22-story tower that was supposed to have a movie theater and some retail and student apartments? Has it stalled, is it still being planned as nothing has happened on the site.

  15. #5055
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by citybooster View Post
    Me too... the second design looks like a more pedestrian version. The first one really looks appealing... really unique in style for Jersey City, really architecturally creative. While the second one isn't bad, shouldn't we aim more for "wow, that's in Jersey City?" to a "nice, but meh" kind of thinking? We're building higher, why not build better and make our skyline have a more distinct flair. Most of the buildings going up or built just don't stand out except for size. I like Journal Squared but if you're looking at the first tower from a distance it looks like a blander 432 Park knockoff.

    What is going on with the St. Peter's College partnered project near the Armory? a 22-story tower that was supposed to have a movie theater and some retail and student apartments? Has it stalled, is it still being planned as nothing has happened on the site.
    In regards to SPU yes they are having a difficult time getting money together. The project is approved but they need to apply for some grant money to bring the project to fruition.

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