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Thread: Jersey City Rising

  1. #91
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    typo by paper

  2. #92
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    "some residents have been concerned there has not been enough housing to support the commercial element. They argued that without the proper mix of housing and office space, Jersey City risked becoming a "ghost town" after 5 p.m. "

    Yeah, so?

    Honestly, compared to some of the stuff I have seen out by the Science Center, i would prefer a buisness ghost town after 5 than the alternative.

    The area does not need to have all residential. You build residential OUTSIDE the buisness district. Brooklyn buisness, Midtown and Wall Street all look kind of lonely (depending on where you go) after hours. Jersey City should follow the same thing. Place some things outside to encourage people to build in the surrounding areas.

    make a good buisness and cultural center and you will get more people wanting to libe closer. You will get gentrification.

    But whatever.

  3. #93
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    Wall Street looks lonely after hours and that's a good example for Jersey City? Urban Planners are desperately trying to change Downtown for a reason, a 24/7 community makes a thriving urban core. Jersey City should try to have its own identity beyond being an extention of the NYC office market by day and a ghost town at night.

    But whatever.

  4. #94
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    Hoboken is Jersey City's answer to "Night life".

  5. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge
    Brooklyn buisness,Midtown and Wall Street all look kind of lonely (depending on where you go) after hours.

    lol, Isn't Midtown home of Times Square :P :wink:

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    He said "depending on where you go." There are plenty of areas of Midtown that aren't all that happening after dark.

  7. #97
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    WEST DISTRICT MAKEOVER
    Mayor unveils preliminary $6M plan for block-wide police-fire complex


    Monday, February 23, 2004

    By Michaelangelo Conte
    Journal staff writer

    Aproposal to build a new $6 million police and fire station in Jersey City's West District was unveiled by Mayor Glenn D. Cunningham at a community meeting last week.

    Cunningham was careful to say the plan is in a very preliminary stage, and even if that plan is the one that is implemented, it could still be two to three years before construction would begin on the Emergency Response Complex at Communipaw and Jackson avenues.

    "The police station is very aged and no longer fills the needs of the police department, and we need a new firehouse also," Cunningham said to the roughly 40 residents attending Wednesday night's meeting in the basement of the Miller Branch of the Jersey City Public Library. "It is a key investment in the community and will be an anchor for Martin Luther King Drive."

    The mayor touted the project as a way to improve safety and raise area property values. He said construction of the state-of-the art facility would allow police officers and firefighters to vacate the century-old buildings they now occupy on Communipaw and Monticello avenues.

    Cunningham said construction of the facility would be an investment into an area of the city largely overlooked by developers. He also said it would be possible to move the city Human Resources Department into the building by adding an additional story.

    "Everyone contributes to this city, and I want to give back to everyone," the mayor said. "We want every neighborhood to be a golden neighborhood. Most development has taken place Downtown, so we have to dig in and make resources available to all of the city."

    The new facility would occupy the entire city block bounded by Communipaw Avenue to the north, Seidler Street to the west, Clinton Avenue to the south and Jackson Avenue to the east, officials said.

    Police facilities would occupy most of the Communipaw Avenue frontage. Fire Department Engine Company 20 and Rescue 1 would access the facility on Seidler and Jackson avenues, utilizing a drive-through garage with doors at each end, officials said.

    There are 39 lots on the proposed site, with 17 of them owned by Jersey City and 22 privately owned. Four lots are vacant but 18 have structures on them. Twelve of the structures are residential and six are commercial, officials said.

    Most of the questions posed by residents at the meeting related to how the city would purchase the privately-owned properties, and what would happen to residents living in the proposed development area.

    If the proposed project were to move forward, Cunningham said, the city would use its power of eminent domain to force the private owners to sell to the city. But he assured residents that the city would help relocate those living on the site, and give the owners fair prices for their property.

    Councilwoman Viola Richardson, a former city police officer, spoke at the meeting. Her opinion of the current West District Police Station? It's "the pits."

    "It's not fit for human habitation," Richardson said. "It's not a healthy workplace for our police officers and firefighters."

    Fire Department Director Jerome Cala said the current fire station dates back to the early 1900s.

    "It's obsolete and it's too small for the new heavier, larger fire apparatuses," he said.

    The new complex, about a block from the current police and fire stations, would be paid for out of the city's capital budget, Cunningham said.

    A study of the soil on the land was completed in November and officials will now review that to determine if remediation is needed and feasible, he said.

    Michaelangelo Conte covers law enforcement. He can be reached at mconte@jjournal.com.

    Copyright 2004 The Jersey Journal.

  8. #98
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    WEST DISTRICT MAKEOVER
    Mayor unveils preliminary $6M plan for block-wide police-fire complex


    Monday, February 23, 2004

    By Michaelangelo Conte
    Journal staff writer

    Aproposal to build a new $6 million police and fire station in Jersey City's West District was unveiled by Mayor Glenn D. Cunningham at a community meeting last week.

    Cunningham was careful to say the plan is in a very preliminary stage, and even if that plan is the one that is implemented, it could still be two to three years before construction would begin on the Emergency Response Complex at Communipaw and Jackson avenues.

    "The police station is very aged and no longer fills the needs of the police department, and we need a new firehouse also," Cunningham said to the roughly 40 residents attending Wednesday night's meeting in the basement of the Miller Branch of the Jersey City Public Library. "It is a key investment in the community and will be an anchor for Martin Luther King Drive."

    The mayor touted the project as a way to improve safety and raise area property values. He said construction of the state-of-the art facility would allow police officers and firefighters to vacate the century-old buildings they now occupy on Communipaw and Monticello avenues.

    Cunningham said construction of the facility would be an investment into an area of the city largely overlooked by developers. He also said it would be possible to move the city Human Resources Department into the building by adding an additional story.

    "Everyone contributes to this city, and I want to give back to everyone," the mayor said. "We want every neighborhood to be a golden neighborhood. Most development has taken place Downtown, so we have to dig in and make resources available to all of the city."

    The new facility would occupy the entire city block bounded by Communipaw Avenue to the north, Seidler Street to the west, Clinton Avenue to the south and Jackson Avenue to the east, officials said.

    Police facilities would occupy most of the Communipaw Avenue frontage. Fire Department Engine Company 20 and Rescue 1 would access the facility on Seidler and Jackson avenues, utilizing a drive-through garage with doors at each end, officials said.

    There are 39 lots on the proposed site, with 17 of them owned by Jersey City and 22 privately owned. Four lots are vacant but 18 have structures on them. Twelve of the structures are residential and six are commercial, officials said.

    Most of the questions posed by residents at the meeting related to how the city would purchase the privately-owned properties, and what would happen to residents living in the proposed development area.

    If the proposed project were to move forward, Cunningham said, the city would use its power of eminent domain to force the private owners to sell to the city. But he assured residents that the city would help relocate those living on the site, and give the owners fair prices for their property.

    Councilwoman Viola Richardson, a former city police officer, spoke at the meeting. Her opinion of the current West District Police Station? It's "the pits."

    "It's not fit for human habitation," Richardson said. "It's not a healthy workplace for our police officers and firefighters."

    Fire Department Director Jerome Cala said the current fire station dates back to the early 1900s.

    "It's obsolete and it's too small for the new heavier, larger fire apparatuses," he said.

    The new complex, about a block from the current police and fire stations, would be paid for out of the city's capital budget, Cunningham said.

    A study of the soil on the land was completed in November and officials will now review that to determine if remediation is needed and feasible, he said.

    Michaelangelo Conte covers law enforcement. He can be reached at mconte@jjournal.com.

    Copyright 2004 The Jersey Journal.

  9. #99
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    I think the trend nowadays is to combine police and fire stations. Not sure if that's good or bad.

  10. #100

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    I think the Goldman Sachs Tower looks very similar to Two International Finance Center in Hong Kong, this tower was designed by Rocco Design Limited. Just much shorter.

    http://www.emporis.com/en/il/pc/?id=100614&aid=8

  11. #101

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    March 26, 2004

    RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE

    In Jersey City, Condos Are to Rise Near Light Rail Line

    By RACHELLE GARBARINE

    Three 1940's industrial buildings that sat vacant for years in Jersey City have been bulldozed to make way for a $40 million development of moderately priced condominiums, in the first phase of a developer's plan for almost 700 homes.

    Ground was broken last month on the development, a block from the Westside Avenue Station of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Line, that will include 172 condominiums, from town houses to apartments and lofts. They are to rise over the next two years on four acres on the south side of Claremont Avenue in a former industrial neighborhood close to the Newark Bay/Hackensack River waterfront and Route 440, a main retail corridor.

    The housing is the initial phase of a 15-acre project that the developer, Cathartes Investments of Boston, plans to continue on the north side of Claremont Avenue and stretch to Route 440. The entire project, to be called the Community at Westside Station, will have up to 500 more residences, as well as retail and office space.

    The project's first phase also supports Jersey City's plan to redevelop its other coastline, away from its reviving Hudson River waterfront, or Gold Coast, and bring development into neighborhoods in the city's western half.

    Robert Cotter, Jersey City's planning director, said that what is called the Bayside Development Plan focuses on a two-square-mile area that has neighborhoods of two- and three-family homes and vacant, underused and environmentally tainted sites. The goal, he said, is to improve the existing neighborhoods and to replace the dormant sites over time with a mix of uses to create a pedestrian-oriented neighborhood, with a refurbished Route 440 as its spine.

    The plan envisions up to 17,000 residences, 110 acres of parks and plazas, seven million square feet of office and retail space and educational facilities including elementary schools and a performing arts center. Mr. Cotter said the plan would advance "in small bites, with two or three of the areas most susceptible to change being redeveloped in the next few years."

    He said his agency was working with a number of developers, as well as with New Jersey City University, which wants to develop the 22 acres it owns in the area as a western campus. One of the developers is Cathartes, which expanded into the metropolitan New York area about four years ago.

    Mark Barer, the Cathartes project manager, said his company got involved with the Claremont Avenue site because of its experience in underdeveloped urban areas. He cited the 600,000 square feet of offices and several hundred lofts it developed in Boston's Seaport district before that area turned around.

    Mr. Barer said that among the factors supporting development in western Jersey City are the rebirth of the city's Hudson River waterfront, pushing growth westward; the nearby project being developed by K. Hovnanian Companies of Edison, which began in the 1980's, has 1,020 town houses and is adding a final 380-unit stage, and the nearby light rail line. The line now runs throughout Bayonne, Jersey City and Hoboken and eventually will extend to Bergen County. Other attractions, Mr. Barer said, were the city's grant of a 20-year tax abatement for his company's project, and its long-term vision for the area.

    Initial prices of the apartments will be in the low $200,000 to low $300,000 range, said Ted Hanley, president of Integrated Real Estate Resources of Jersey City, the project's sales agent.

    Eighty-four of the first residences will be built over the next year. They are to include town houses with two and three bedrooms and 1,400 to 1,500 square feet and two-bedroom apartments with 974 to 1,010 square feet. The remaining 88 residences will be lofts with 800 to 1,400 square feet in two mid-rise buildings, construction of which is to start this summer.

    Minno & Wasko of Lambertville, N.J., has designed the project to be a traditional urban neighborhood that blends with the rest of the city. Many of the homes will have garages in the back and porches, balconies or stoops in the front to encourage neighbors to socialize, Mr. Barer said.

    Mr. Hanley added that with the rail line nearby, which provides access to PATH and ferry stops to Manhattan, residents will not need cars for work or recreation.

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  12. #102

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    The Jersey Journal

    Jersey City

    Newark Ave. development plans get smaller

    Monday, March 29, 2004

    By Julia M. Scott
    Journal correspondent

    A massive development planned for Newark Avenue between Grove Street and Luis Muñoz Marin Boulevard is being scaled down a bit, architects for the project told the Jersey City Planning Board last week.

    Dubbed Grove Pointe and scheduled to open in fall 2006, the building will now be 29 stories at its highest point, instead of the originally proposed 34 stories, because plans for a hotel have been eliminated for marketing reasons, project manager Joseph Punia of the Bridgewater-based firm Schenkman/Kushner said.

    Grove Pointe will still house 525 residential units - 67 condos and 458 rental apartments - but the garage capacity will be reduced from 600 parking spots to 535, Punia said. But future residents will have a rooftop pool and deck to look forward to.

    As part of the project, developers will revamp a one-block section of Newark Avenue and the triangular park area at the entrance to the Grove Street PATH station, directly across from the building. Newark Avenue will be redone to feel like a pedestrian plaza, but the road will be strong enough to handle bus traffic, Punia said.

    The commission voted 6-0 Tuesday to approve the changes. Construction is scheduled to begin this fall and take about 24 months, Punia said.

    In other business, amendments to the Water Street Redevelopment Plan included adding a square block between Mallory Avenue and West Side Avenue and between Claremont Avenue and Pollock Avenue, minus a small section near Grant Avenue, to the designated redevelopment area.

    Within this eight-acre block, the redevelopment plan included requiring a dog run if any residential units are built in the southwest section of the block. The construction of four new streets within the newly designated section were also outlined by city planner Douglas Greenfeld.

    The board voted 6-0 to recommend the city council to declare the area in need of redevelopment.

    The board also voted 6-0, with commissioners Gregory Malave and Larry Eccleston absent, to:

    Approve an amended site plan for the Columbus Towers at 303 Warren St. to include a semi-circular drop-off instead of a full roundabout.

    Amend the Morris Canal Redevelopment Plan to bar new liquor stores from setting up shop in the area.

    Approve the conversion of four ground floor apartments to professional medical offices at 40 Newport Parkway.

    Approve preliminary and final site plans to construct three new two-family homes at 94, 96 and 98 Ege Ave. to be sold at market rate with the condition that the backyard, which borders the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail, have a fence at least 8 feet high.

    A Verizon Wireless application to install a rooftop cell antenna was carried to the April 20 meeting at the request of the applicant.

  13. #103
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    Jersey City goal: Attract tourists
    Mayor's wife named to head new council

    Saturday, April 03, 2004

    By Michaelangelo Conte
    Journal staff writer

    Jersey City Mayor Glenn D. Cunningham kicked off a campaign to popularize the city as a tourist destination yesterday, naming his wife, Sandra Bolden-Cunningham, as head of the new Council on Arts & Tourism.

    "We have heard the phrase that Jersey City's waterfront is the Gold Coast, but we believe the gold is not only on the coast but in Jersey City itself, and we believe that gold is ready to be mined by tourism," Bolden-Cunningham said.

    Formation of the CAT was announced at a breakfast with about 200 area business leaders and artists on the ninth floor of the Hyatt Hotel at Exchange Place, against the backdrop of sweeping panoramas of New York City and the Hudson River.

    At the program's unveiling, New Jersey Commerce & Economic Growth Commission Director the Rev. William Watley presented Cunningham with a check for $25,000 to pay for preliminary expenses.

    City spokesman Stan H. Eason said the CAT is an all-volunteer group that will seek grants in the hopes of hiring paid staff members at some point. CAT officials passed out a questionnaire to those at the meeting, seeking their input.

    The questionnaire asks:

    When you think of Jersey City, what comes to mind?

    Are you interested in becoming a member of the CAT Steering Committee to further develop our agenda?

    How can CAT help your business/industry become a focal point for visitors or tourists?

    Bolden-Cunningham said those at the meeting would be asked to volunteer their time and perhaps money to the endeavor.

    The focal point of the breakfast meeting was a short video that delineated important historical events in Jersey City from the 1600s to today and focused on recent development in the city as well.

    Among those in attendance was DoubleTree Club Suites Director of Revenue Management Judith Bichsel Newman, and she lauded the tourism initiative.

    "We've been waiting for something like this, and we hope it can create interest to get the attention we need," said Bichsel Newman. "If you want to do something cultural, come to Jersey City."

    In fact, Bolden-Cunningham touted Jersey City as a place in which 50 languages and 100 dialects are spoken in the schools, and a place she called New Jersey's most diverse.

    Also touted as a tourist attraction was the character of the city's historic neighborhoods, including Paulus Hook, famous for being the site of a Revolutionary War battle.

    The city's arts community was also listed as a draw for tourism, as was Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty, Liberty State Park and the Liberty Science Center.

    The city's role in the effort to assist New York during the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks was also cited, as was the nine-story Sept. 11 memorial, which city officials hope to have constructed by the fall.

    Cunningham said the city is the site of the first European settlement in New Jersey and he noted that the Underground Railroad passed through.

    Jersey City is also the location of the state's four tallest buildings, he said, including the Goldman Sachs office tower, which is the tallest.

    Speakers also cited the Hudson River Waterfront Walkway being built from Bayonne to Fort Lee and the ferries, bridges and PATH trains that make New York City easily accessible.

    Jersey City Planning Director Robert Cotter also gave a presentation in which he discussed recent development in the city and projections for future growth. Watley closed his address on that topic as well.

    "The New Jersey Growth Commission is pleased to stand in partnership with you as you show how a community can have a turnaround season," Watley said. "We salute you, Jersey City, New Jersey, perfect together."

    Copyright 2004 The Jersey Journal.

  14. #104
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Jersey City has been named one of the 12 Best Walking Cities in the Nation. Click link to take you to website. Jersey City second most expensieve place to live in the country and one of the 12 best walking cities in the country, hmmm I like this.

    http://www.prevention.com/cda/featur...1-6862,00.html

  15. #105
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    Sometime I should explore a little more there. The only place I've walked through is the southern Downtown area, and both times it was accompanied by freak storms.

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