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Thread: Jersey City Rising

  1. #121
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    The only problem is the NY and NYC dont ever wake up, they always raise taxes and make it impossible for business to stay here, thus JC keeps rising.

    Maybe NYC shoyld stop giving developers Liberty Bonds to convert good office space in Lower Manhattan so these firms cant rent space here when they have to grow.

  2. #122
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    You mean the conversion of OBSOLETE, prewar office space. Ninety Washington Street aside, all of the buildings that are undergoing or have completed residential conversion are from the 1930s or earlier.

  3. #123

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    Maybe, instead of spending money on housing projects, NYC could construct office projects :P :wink:

  4. #124

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    August 11, 2004

    OUR TOWNS

    Between Art and Commerce, Taking a Stand

    By PETER APPLEBOME


    Bill Rodwell, a sculptor, in an entrance at 111 First Street in Jersey City, an artists' haven being considered for residential redevelopment.

    Jersey City IN the beginning, everyone agrees, it was like an uncertain journey to the end of the earth - a ruined industrial landscape of half-deserted 19th-century warehouses and grimy streets, with the air accented by the occasional smell of a burning car or a stray trash fire.

    In the beginning, everyone also agrees, it was quite magical - every nook and cranny, it seemed, harbored a surprise: an abandoned David Hockney painting, a room with a 15-foot high mound of old carriages and wheels, thousands of square feet of left-behind granite, mounds of surplus teddy bears, tobacco-drying racks and exotic fabrics.

    Now, 15 or so years later, the mammoth red brick fortress at 111 First Street has gone from a place at the jagged edges of a struggling city to an unruly assemblage of perhaps 100 artists in the midst of a real estate dream world of shiny new office towers and condos.

    Along the way, it has become a symbol of the funky, iconoclastic side of this city's quite remarkable renewal. The issue being fought over now is this: Do the artists get to stay in the neighborhood they helped create, or does this become the urban version of a suburban subdivision named for fauna and flora that were destroyed so it could be built?

    There's still both darkness and magic at 111 First Street. Filled with warrens of artists of every stripe, the hulking building sprawls over 328,000 square feet of oak plank floors and exposed pipe making up an entire city block.

    It has Stygian bathrooms and an air of prehistoric disrepair. But walk into the studios behind every door and there's magic everywhere: the dreamlike photographs Ed Fausty makes largely from the world at 111 First, the delicate tiles at Lisa Portnoff's Riverside Tileworks, the van Gogh-like swirls of energy at Elizabeth Onorato's studio, inspired by her study of physics.

    Sooner or later, the real world of the real estate boom had to impinge on 111 First. After a three-year ratcheting-up of hostilities over rents and repairs, the time has come. Lloyd Goldman, whose New Gold Equities owns the building and a smaller one at 110 First, across the street, has begun dismantling the smaller one. He has also begun a repair project to knock 50 feet off the giant smokestack in the middle of 111 First.

    His development plan calls for a 20-story residential building at 110 First and a redevelopment of 111 that would combine artists' studios and living quarters at the edges of the property with another 20-story tower growing out of its center.

    "The landlord and the tenants are on the same side,'' said Michelle Berliner, director of development for BLDG Management, the agent for New Gold Equities. "They want to maintain an artists' community, and so do we."

    But after proposals that would have doubled many rents, and after assorted squabbles in recent years, the artists figure that there would be nothing so tenuous as their existence at below-market rates in a high-dollar residential complex. They have proposed forming a nonprofit organization, 111 ArtsFirst, to own and operate the building as a place where artists can live, have studios and operate galleries or education spaces.

    "We need a divorce as soon as possible,'' said Bill Rodwell, a sculptor who heads the building's tenants association. "They want us out by hook or by crook. We've got cops in the buildings, alarms on the doors; it's like we're under siege."

    He and the other tenants know their history - that artists are usually better at discovering hip places than managing to stay there once they're discovered. But this isn't a wholly one-sided battle. The city has found various ways to support the artists, and the tenants have their own well-regarded development consultant.

    The city is considering a long-awaited plan to establish a historic district in the area, which would severely limit what developers and property owners could do. And 111 First has become enough of an admired institution that an attempt to dismantle it would be political poison - it's the artists, not the building owners, after all, who are throwing a big party on the steps of City Hall on Saturday, with music and an art bazaar.

    THE battle over 111 First is just part of the larger question of whether to move forward with the Powerhouse Arts District, which has been in the works since the mid-1990's. There's a lot of money at stake, but there's a lot of civic pride, too. The artists don't have the millions it will take to buy and redevelop 111 First, but there are development groups like the New Jersey Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency that might be able to provide financing for a nonprofit to run the building, allowing New Gold to make a decent return from 111 First and build its tower across the street.

    That might not happen. But after 15 years, if the artists have learned anything, it's that it will take more than magic and art for them to stay in Jersey City's arts district.

    E-mail: peappl@nytimes.com

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  5. #125
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    SCHOOL CITY
    Jersey City's colleges offering courses on waterfront; Rutgers coming, too
    Thursday, August 26, 2004

    By Kelly Heyboer
    Newhouse News Service

    Where the world sees growing throngs of corporate workers rushing about Jersey City's waterfront office buildings, the state's colleges and universities see thousands of potential students.

    Within the crowds might be a middle manager looking for a graduate degree and a promotion. Perhaps a bored office worker eager to take a few classes and consider a career change. Or a young city resident who wants to earn an undergraduate degree close to home.

    As the boom in Jersey City continues, the city is growing into New Jersey's hottest higher education market.

    Three of the city's colleges - Hudson County Community College, New Jersey City University and Saint Peter's College - all have ambitious expansion plans in the works.

    The University of Phoenix, a for-profit school that spent years lobbying the state to license it to offer degrees on a waterfront campus, has also opened a campus in the Newport section.

    And now, Rutgers University is planning to open its doors in Jersey City. The state university's business school will open a satellite campus at Harborside Financial Center at Exchange Place this fall.

    With its growing real estate market, proximity to New York City and mass transportation, setting up in the state's second-largest city made sense, said Howard Tuckman, dean of Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick.

    "I've had Jersey City in the back of my mind for five years," Tuckman said. "Watching the development on the waterfront, you don't have to be Albert Einstein. This is a developer's dream."

    Once Rutgers moves in, Jersey City will have five colleges and universities. (Newark, the state's largest city, has four.)

    Jersey City officials say more college students and professors will bring more business to area restaurants and shops. Expanding Jersey City's campuses into surrounding neighborhoods also may help revitalize neglected corners of the city.

    Robert Cotter, the city's planning director, said the idea of Jersey City as a college town is not far-fetched.

    "I don't see it being an Ivy League, leafy sort of place," Cotter said. "But it's an urban campus."

    The University of Phoenix, which specializes in offering courses for working adults, opened its campus in 20,000 square feet of office space on Pavonia Avenue. The university has no sports teams, dormitories or student center. Instead, it offers accelerated evening and weekend courses for workers who want to earn undergraduate degrees.

    Rutgers will open its satellite campus this fall in rented office space currently being converted into classrooms at 34 Exchange Place.

    The university, which has similar satellite campuses in Morristown and Hopewell, plans to start by offering master's level courses in business administration. The university hopes to initially attract about 35 new students, then expand to offer other business education and certificate programs.

    Bill Bruckner, an account manager at Jersey City-based Pershing, was weighing whether to enroll in the Rutgers MBA program this fall. Rutgers' reputation and flexible class schedules are tempting, he said.

    But the location of the new campus, less than five minutes from the financial company's offices, is "probably the biggest attraction," said Bruckner, 30, during an interview earlier this summer.

    Seton Hall University also is looking to get into the Jersey City market. The university is talking with local corporations about offering business classes via a television hookup from its South Orange campus, a spokeswoman said.

    Officials at Jersey City's existing colleges say they are not worried about the competition.

    "The Jersey City/Hudson County market is large enough and diverse enough to absorb a large number of higher education providers," said Carlos Hernandez, president of the 9,400-student New Jersey City University.

    While the competition is concentrating on the waterfront, NJCU is looking to expand its 46-acre Kennedy Boulevard campus into Jersey City's "other waterfront" on the west side. The public university is working with the city to find ways to develop a 700-acre tract on Newark Bay, Hernandez said.

    Neighboring Saint Peter's College already has branched out of its Kennedy Boulevard campus to begin offering classes near the waterfront and inside several corporate offices.

    The 3,000-student Catholic college also is searching for space to set up a permanent campus on the waterfront to attract the same students Rutgers and the University of Phoenix are eyeing.

    Eugene Cornacchia, the college's provost, said Saint Peter's welcomes the competition in a city where it has been for 132 years.

    "It shows Hudson County is the place to come if you want to get an education," Cornacchia said.

    HCCC to expand

    At Hudson County Community College, enrollment has increased more than 110 percent since 1992, thanks to increasing demand and new programs. Glen Gabert, the two-year college's president, expects enrollment will double again in the next 10 to 15 years.

    The 6,400-student county college will open a $25 million classroom building in Journal Square next summer. In 18 months, the school plans to break ground on a campus on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail line in Union City.

    The new universities in town will only mean more students for everyone, Gabert added. Hudson Community already has agreements to help graduates transfer to Rutgers and the University of Phoenix's new campuses.

    "They are going to help us and we are going to serve them . This could actually increase all of our enrollments," Gabert said.

    "There is enough ignorance out there for all the colleges to flourish," he added with a laugh.

    Copyright 2004 The Jersey Journal. Used with permission.

  6. #126
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    Has anyone noticed the roof of this tower (on the right) in Jersey City at night? It does a little light show....


    Photo borrowed from hkskyline at skyscraperpage.com in one of his New York City photos threads.

  7. #127
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    its plain and simple, New Jersey invests in firms and offers great deal, NYC wastes prime development sites on apartments for the rich. In the end this will continue they already are the financial capital of the world.

  8. #128

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    Quote Originally Posted by NYatKNIGHT
    Has anyone noticed the roof of this tower (on the right) in Jersey City at night? It does a little light show....
    I saw the new buildings in Newport have light show on their roof. Pretty much red, white and blue. I don't like them to be honest. They look cheap.

  9. #129
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    Oh, I saw all white lights. Yeah, it seems out of place and maybe a little tacky, but it livens up the shoreline over there a bit.

  10. #130
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    You know what guys sorry Jersey City isn't as rich as Manhattan, thats all we can afford and alot of people over here like it. So say whatever you want because nothing we do ever seems to please you guys and you always have a problem with what we do, so if you dont like it, tough.

  11. #131

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCMAN320
    You know what guys sorry Jersey City isn't as rich as Manhattan, thats all we can afford and alot of people over here like it. So say whatever you want because nothing we do ever seems to please you guys and you always have a problem with what we do, so if you dont like it, tough.
    :roll: Does someone need to relieve the wedgie??

  12. #132
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    Nice one. Hey say what you want ok, I'm just tired of someone always bashing Jersey City to make kind of pathetic point that Manhattan is the end all to be all.

  13. #133
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    Nobody has been, at least not here...

  14. #134

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCMAN320
    You know what guys sorry Jersey City isn't as rich as Manhattan, thats all we can afford and alot of people over here like it. So say whatever you want because nothing we do ever seems to please you guys and you always have a problem with what we do, so if you dont like it, tough.
    Nice said. Jersey city does its best with what they have and although they can't compare with Manhattan, Jersey City has a great skyline wich will keep expanding till god knows when.

  15. #135

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCMAN320
    You know what guys sorry Jersey City isn't as rich as Manhattan, thats all we can afford and alot of people over here like it. So say whatever you want because nothing we do ever seems to please you guys and you always have a problem with what we do, so if you dont like it, tough.
    I don't have a problem with Jersey City. I just don't like the light show on those two buildings in Newport. Especially for the NOC VII building. I really like that building. It looks good with JC skyline in day time. But the light show just does not fit JC skyline at night. In my opinion, when the office space got filled up, the office lights on the building alone will make it better without the light show. By the way, I did not compare JC to Manhattan either.

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