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Thread: Tappan Zee Bridge Alteration or Replacement

  1. #91

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    http://www.tzbsite.com/

    For Immediate Release: September 26, 2008

    Contact: Charles Carrier
    New York State Department of Transportation
    518-457-6400

    PROPOSAL FOR TAPPAN ZEE BRIDGE & I-287 CORRIDOR UNVEILED
    Team Recommends Bridge Replacement, Addition of Bus Rapid Transit & Commuter Rail


    The leaders of the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT), the State Thruway Authority and Metropolitan Transportation Authority Metro-North Railroad (MNR) were joined today by Westchester County Executive Andrew J. Spano and Rockland County Executive C. Scott Vanderhoef when the agencies announced their recommendations for the Tappan Zee Bridge/I-287 Corridor. The three-agency team has recommended that the bridge be replaced with a transit-ready bridge and that bus rapid transit and commuter rail transit be added to the corridor.

    The proposal was announced at a news conference in Tarrytown after the Tappan Zee Bridge/I-287 Corridor Environmental Review project team briefed the Westchester Rockland Tappan Zee Futures Task Force, which had been appointed by the two county executives. The proposal calls for a complete replacement of the existing bridge and the construction of a bus rapid transit system along the 30-mile highway corridor across Rockland and Westchester counties in the lower Hudson Valley. Bus rapid transit will be operational when the new bridge opens. The proposal also recommends a commuter rail transit system across Rockland County and the new Tappan Zee Bridge to provide New York City commuters access to Grand Central Terminal.

    “The Tappan Zee Bridge is a vital link in the transportation network of New York State. It is a central part of life for people in this part of the state and, with planning and foresight, we can make even better use of this stretch over the Hudson River,” said Governor David A. Paterson. “I am pleased the project team and the county executives have come to resolution on the best way to move forward. Focusing on New York State’s critical infrastructure needs must continue even during this challenging economic time, as these projects keep our economies strong and our state thriving.”

    Project staff will be hosting public information meetings on October 28, 29, and 30 in Westchester, Rockland and Orange counties, respectively, to explain the recommendations in detail. The project team will then move forward with the environmental study, while at the same time developing a comprehensive plan and innovative ways to finance the project.

    “Improvements to the I-287 corridor are critical to the health of our region and the continued high quality of life in Westchester,” Westchester County Executive Spano said. “A new east-west transit link will provide the backbone for appropriate growth and continued revitalization of our downtowns. I commend the state Department of Transportation, the project team and the task force for their thoughtful and rigorous work. We are happy to see this project moving forward."

    Rockland County Executive Vanderhoef said, “Rockland County will continue to move toward a bright and thriving future only if it is served by a comprehensive transportation infrastructure that includes more transit options. We believe the project team has come up with the right solutions for the region. We look forward to working with the team as it advances this project.”

    Today’s announcement means that the project team will focus exclusively on studying the replacement of the Tappan Zee Bridge with a transit-ready bridge and construction of cross-corridor bus rapid transit as well as commuter rail transit across Rockland County and on to New York City. The project team is made up of NYSDOT, MNR and the Thruway Authority and is led by NYSDOT.

    Accompanying the announcement was the release of the project team’s two voluminous in-depth studies: “Alternative Analysis of Rehabilitation or Replacement of the Tappan Zee Bridge” and “Transit Mode Selection Report.” Both documents are available on the project Web site (here at www.tzbsite.com).

    Full implementation of the project team’s proposal would cost: $6.4 billion for a new bridge accepting bus rapid transit and commuter rail transit; $2.9 billion for bus rapid transit andhighway improvements; and $6.7 billion for the build-out of commuter rail transit in the future. The preliminary cost estimates may change as choices are made on alignment, bridge design and other details during the next few years. NYSDOT is finalizing a contract for a financial advisor to develop options for funding the project and will release the initial phase of a finance study soon.

    In developing the recommendations announced today, NYSDOT, MNR and the Thruway Authority worked in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Transit Administration. Since last year, the project team has analyzed seven bridge rehabilitation or replacement options and eight transit mode alternatives. Those analyses, which also incorporated a lengthy public comment record, have been completed, resulting in today’s recommendations.

    The recommendations announced today, once finalized in a Final Scoping Report to be issued after the public information meetings next month, will be the subject of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). The DEIS is scheduled to be completed by late 2009, with a Final Environmental Impact Statement to be completed in early 2010.

    The DEIS will evaluate the environmental impacts of various ways to implement the chosen plan, including alternative bridge designs, highway improvements and alignments, all of which will accommodate both bus rapid transit and commuter rail transit. The project team will present the final DEIS alternatives to the public at an open house early next year. The Record of Decision that will result in 2010 will identify the preferred alternative.

    “After extensive planning, public outreach and analysis, the project team has developed an environmentally responsible proposal that will address the transportation needs of this critical interstate corridor for decades to come,” NYSDOT Commissioner Astrid C. Glynn said. “We have insisted on the utmost rigor in all the analysis that we are releasing today, and I and my partners at the Thruway Authority and Metro-North greatly appreciate the support the project team has received from county executives Spano and Vanderhoef throughout this process. We will continue to work with them as we move the project forward.”

    Thruway Authority Executive Director Michael R. Fleischer said, “After intensive scrutiny of whether rehabilitation of the Tappan Zee Bridge could yield the engineering, environmental, safety and mobility goals set forth in this study, a new bridge is the best option for the traveling public, the corridor and the economic well-being of the region and state. While the process of finding the best transportation solution for this region continues, the Authority will continue to fulfill its responsibility to maintain and operate the Tappan Zee Bridge by continuing to make the necessary investments to assure safe and efficient travel for the millions of motorists that use the bridge annually.”

    Metro-North President Howard Permut said, “This region will see enormous growth throughout this century and needs a transit system that will help it grow in a sensible and environmentally sustainable manner. Our recommendation that the cross-county corridor be served by bus rapid transit and that the huge travel market to and from New York City be served by new commuter rail service will provide a transit system for the 21st century. Our plan links new rail infrastructure with Metro-North’s existing network while providing an additional east-west transit solution to congested roadways, high energy prices and long travel times.”

    The Bridge

    In the analysis just completed, the project team’s objective was to determine which rehabilitation and replacement alternatives are reasonable options to be evaluated in the DEIS. Alternatives analysis found that replacing the bridge is the best way to provide better engineering performance, lower maintenance costs, shortest construction time, least environmental impacts and the longest life cycle for the bridge.

    The Tappan Zee Bridge, constructed 52 years ago, was built according to prevailing standards in the early 1950s. While the bridge is safe, its design does not meet current national standards for structural elements and some of its deficiencies can not be addressed – even in the most robust rehabilitation scenarios – because of the structure’s basic design characteristics.

    Bridge replacement options proposed for study include three scenarios designed to accommodate bus rapid transit and commuter rail transit, as well as bicycle-pedestrian access. The options feature single- or dual-level bridge designs.

    The Transit Solution

    The recommended transit solution calls for full-corridor bus rapid transit from Suffern to Port Chester with transfer points and new stations in between, as well as a new, two-track commuter rail transit service from the Port Jervis Line at Suffern, across Rockland County with several new stations and over the new bridge, connecting to the Hudson Line south of Tarrytown and thus providing direct service to Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan. Some bus rapid transit service routes would extend beyond the project limits and could be modified as demand changes.

    Anticipated growth in travel demand in this region and the ability of the proposed transit modes to accommodate it were among the most important considerations in making this recommendation. The combination of bus rapid transit and commuter rail transit also would provide the most flexibility to accommodate multiple markets, including the cross-corridor and New York City travel markets. Completion of the Access to the Region’s Core project was taken into account in the developing the recommendation.

    Public Meetings

    Public meetings to present the recommendations in detail will be held at the following times and locations:

    Westchester County – Tuesday, October 28, 2008, at 4:30 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
    White Plains High School, 550 North St, White Plains, NY

    Rockland County – Wednesday, October 29, 2008, at 4:30 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
    Rockland Community College, 145 College Rd, Suffern, NY

    Orange County – Thursday, October 30, 2008, at 4:30 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
    Central Valley Elementary School, 45 Route 32, Central Valley, NY.

    Comments

    Submit written comments at any time during the comment period, which ends on December 1, 2008 to:
    TZB/I-287 Environmental Review
    660 White Plains Road, Suite 340
    Tarrytown, NY 10591

    Fax to: 914-358-0621

    Email to: tzbsite@dot.state.ny.us

  2. #92

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    I don't see how this solution could tie into the proposed NYC-Albany HSR and a fast link to Stewart airport?

    The Albany HSR was proposed to be built along the Thruway and connect over the new TZ bridge.. The same line would have allowed Stewart airport access thus allowing the airport to be reached from NYC in reasonable time...

    However, a two track link will not allow an express train over take local trains.. right? So, isn't this a little short sighted here?

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    So whats the recent news on this? I heard there going with an Elevated Rail and Not underground on the Rockland side?

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    Its years away from even being ready to build - they're still in the planning stages. Latest I heard was a bridge with commuter rail, bus lanes, and a 16 billion price tag (at least) that no one knows how to pay for.

    I wouldn't look for anything for at least a decade. They just started a 150 million dollar deck replacement program thats supposed to extend its lifespan 10-20 more years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    ^ What's "urban sprawl"?
    New Jersey

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    Quote Originally Posted by dtolman View Post
    Its years away from even being ready to build - they're still in the planning stages. Latest I heard was a bridge with commuter rail, bus lanes, and a 16 billion price tag (at least) that no one knows how to pay for.

    I wouldn't look for anything for at least a decade. They just started a 150 million dollar deck replacement program thats supposed to extend its lifespan 10-20 more years.
    How they come up with 16 billion is surprising....., 1 Billion for BRT what a joke.... The Commuter Rail plans West of the Hudson don't even use the old Piermont branch which is still intact and could cut the commuter Rail cost by half.... They don't seem to factor in the grade between Nanuet and Nyack , trains should be placed on a curve.... This whole project seems rushed and poorly designed...

  7. #97

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    I wouldn't call $16 billion surprising. I would call $16 billion unconscionable and terrifying. How can a roughly 4.8 kilometer bridge, even with all the trimmings, cost three times as much as an 18 kilometer cross-sea tunnel in Europe? Last I checked, Denmark and Germany were not callous in their handling of the environment nor blessed with radically cheap labor.
    Last edited by marnegator; May 25th, 2011 at 11:58 PM. Reason: forgot to finish typing!

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    Quote Originally Posted by marnegator View Post
    I wouldn't call $16 billion surprising. I would call $16 billion unconscionable and terrifying. How can a roughly 4.8 kilometer bridge, even with all the trimmings, cost three times as much as an 18 kilometer cross-sea tunnel in Europe? Last I checked, Denmark and Germany were not callous in their handling of the environment nor blessed with radically cheap labor.
    It sounds so off , 16 Billion $$ can get you all the MBTA or SEPTA build out plans. This sounds like a poorly planned project , an Elevated structure is planned for Rockland County , i thought a tunnel was planned? And what kind of half ass contractors and designers are they higher , my engineer friend says a grade that steep isn't safe for trains and should be built with a curve. The plan ignores existing ROW between Spring Valley and Suffern which is intact and all it needs is tracks and station rebuilds. He estimates that reusing that could save the Rail project 2 billion $$ , since no New ROW would be needed and the grades are gentle. He also questions the bridges cost , since we abandoned the Cable stayed and Suspension bridge why is it costing so much? 1 Billion for BRT , its just a lane with a few stations why is it costing us a billion? I mean the whole project sounds like its mored in corruption , but this also makes you question the SAS and 7 extension costs? The ARC Tunnel and alot of other projects..... European Unions are more powerful then our unions yet there projects cost considerably less then ours.

  9. #99
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Cool idea. It's a beautiful bridge.

    A short video accompanies the article.


    Green Future May Be In Store For Old Tappan Zee Span

    By: NY1 News

    New York State is considering turning the Tappan Zee Bridge into a greenway instead of demolishing it once a new bridge is built next to it.Governor Andrew Cuomo says his administration is discussing whether to turn the bridge - which connects Rockland County to Westchester - into a walkway for pedestrians and bicyclists, similar to the High Line in Manhattan.

    Cuomo says the move would offer outstanding views and recreational opportunities.

    http://www.ny1.com/content/top_stori...appan-zee-span

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    What a waste , no Transit on the New Bridge , but we can have a greenway on the old bridge....

  11. #101

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    You know what, I don't like the old bridge design because I find the steel work too messy. I'm not sure two bridges will look very nice side-by-side. In fact the old bridge might mess up the view of the new one. I say tear it down.

    Oh, and regarding NO TRANSIT ON THE NEW BRIDGE --- What the hell, that is outrageous. Cost cutting will come back to bite them.

    Also, this will affect future plans for connecting Stewart airport with Manhattan via fast rail , because they can only go via the NJ side without a decent river crossing. This could be the end of Stewart ever being more than regional airport.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    Green Future May Be In Store For Old Tappan Zee Span
    Will never happen. They're going to do a feasibility study and figure out just how many 10s of millions it'll cost this broke State to renovate and maintain the bridge and then they're going to send barges down the river with a bunch of welding torches

  13. #103

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    Yes, but no transit, now that is unforgivable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by futurecity View Post
    Oh, and regarding NO TRANSIT ON THE NEW BRIDGE --- What the hell, that is outrageous. Cost cutting will come back to bite them.

    Also, this will affect future plans for connecting Stewart airport with Manhattan via fast rail , because they can only go via the NJ side without a decent river crossing. This could be the end of Stewart ever being more than regional airport.
    Lets be real, at 60 miles from Manhattan Stewart airport is never going to be a true alternative airport. If rail were ever built to the airport it sure is not going to be "High speed" rail, it will be commuter rail. Amtrak's Acela between NY Penn and Boston averages about 60 mph, and that's the best we have in this Nation. To build true high speed rail to Stewart would cost probably double what the canceled Hudson rail tunnel would cost, and the ridership potential would be a fraction of the ridership potential for the ARC Hudson rail tunnel. All that money would be better invested in the existing airports, EWR, JFK and LGA.

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    Yeah, waste of money. Forget Stewart. Any direct rail link should focus squarely on JFK or Laguardia

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