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Thread: Tappan Zee Bridge Alteration or Replacement

  1. #121
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    Tappan Zee Constructors Corp.? I sure hope liability extends to its member firms

  2. #122

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    That's not a bad looking design but the lack of mass transit is downright criminal. One politically driven shortsight begets another.

  3. #123
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    what mass transit exactly do you think would be a good fit here in the mid hudson valley?

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    The Growth of Corridor over the past decade along with future projects of upwards 600,000 move to west of the Hudson by 2050 warrant either 4A & 4B..


    http://www.tzbsite.com/public-involv...res-feb07.html



    Alternative 1 is the no-build alternative, one that is required for analysis in environmental impact statements. It is the yardstick against which the impacts of build alternatives are measured. Under this alternative, maintenance of the bridge and the Thruway would continue in order to keep the facilities in a safe operating condition. In addition, this alternative does include approved program improvements for I-287 in Westchester County, as do all other alternatives. However, it should be noted that no build does not mean no impact. There are transportation, environmental and cost impacts related to doing nothing.

    Alternative 2 involves rehabilitation of the existing bridge to meet current design and seismic standards. It also includes implementation of Transportation Demand Management/Transportation Systems Management (TDM/TSM) measures such as congestion pricing, ramp metering and increased E-Z Pass usage. Some of these measures are already being implemented by the Thruway Authority. These TDM/TSM measures are part of all build alternatives.

    The main span of the bridge would be rehabilitated, with the bridge remaining in its current configuration with 7 travel lanes and the movable barrier. It should also be noted that half of the bridge (the trestle section) would have to be entirely replaced. When completed, however, this alternative would result in ongoing high maintenance costs, traffic disruptions and traffic safety issues. For example, there are currently no shoulders on the bridge for motorists to safely pull out of traffic.

    For the major build alternatives, 3, 4A, 4B, and 4C, there are common highway improvements being considered for all. These include:



    • High occupancy toll, or HOT lanes, across Rockland County and over a replacement bridge. These HOT lanes are primarily for buses and high occupancy vehicles. Single occupancy vehicles would be allowed into the lanes on a dynamic toll basis, that is, a toll that increases as traffic congestion increases.
    • Rockland County is characterized by steep grades (3 to 4%) that affect the movement of traffic and also how rail transit would be implemented in the corridor. Thus, we are studying possible westbound and eastbound climbing lanes.
    • Finally, a possible lane extension near Suffern is being considered to balance the lane configuration on the Thruway.



    There are also common replacement bridge concepts for Alternatives 3, 4A, 4B and 4C. A replacement bridge would be constructed just north of the existing bridge. However, it is most important to note that the replacement bridge touches down in Nyack and Tarrytown in the same locations as the existing bridge. As shown in the enlargements, the dashed lines show the existing right-of-way for the bridge and Thruway. The replacement bridge touches down within the existing right-of-way.

    Alternative 3 is Full-Corridor Bus Rapid Transit, or BRT. It includes the HOT lanes and climbing lanes in Rockland and a replacement bridge as just described. Buses would use the HOT lanes in Rockland and over the bridge, keeping out of mixed traffic. In Westchester County, the buses would use exclusive bus lanes, largely on existing streets such Route 119, local streets in White Plains, and Westchester Avenue. These lanes could be used by existing bus services such as the (Westchester County) Bee-Line System, which would be a major benefit to bus users.

    Alternative 4A is the first of three alternatives involving commuter rail transit, or CRT. It would include the previously described highway improvements in Rockland County and a replacement bridge. From the transit perspective, it offers full-corridor CRT from Suffern to Port Chester with direct connections or transfers to the Port Jervis, Hudson, Harlem, New Haven lines and possibly to the Pascack Valley Line. There would be 9 or 10 new stations along the corridor, including a major station in Tarrytown, called the Tappan Zee Station. This alternative would offer a one-seat ride for passengers from Rockland and Orange Counties across the corridor to Stamford and also to New York City.

    Alternative 4B differs from 4A in the type of transit service across Westchester County. It includes the previously described highway improvements, a replacement bridge, and direct rail connection to the Hudson Line for a one-seat ride to New York City. In Westchester, the transit mode would be light rail, or LRT. This service would start at the existing Tarrytown Station, connect to the new Tappan Zee transfer station, and then continue across the county. It would be primarily in its own right-of-way along Route 119 and Westchester Avenue, and in White Plains it would be on local streets.

    Alternative 4C includes the previously described highway improvements, a replacement bridge, and direct rail connection to the Hudson Line for a one-seat ride to New York City. However, in Westchester, the transit mode would be bus rapid transit, generally following the bus routes described in Alternative 3.

  5. #125
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    A Colossal Bridge Will Rise Across the Hudson

    By JOSEPH BERGER

    (see article for more pics)


    Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

    [WOW!] \/



    David Capobianco was a toddler in 1964 when the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge slowly soared over his neighborhood of Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, and tethered it to Staten Island. As he grew up, the improbable notion of assembling something so big and of such gossamer design propelled him to become a civil engineer.

    Now after years of public argument and indecision, the first new colossal steel bridge in the New York area since the Verrazano is finally beginning to rise over one of the most spacious stretches of the Hudson River, a replacement for the decaying Tappan Zee, the longest bridge in the state, and Mr. Capobianco, 51, is its project manager.

    “All other projects I’ve worked on are dwarfed by this — the size of the equipment involved, the enormity of what we’re doing, the number of people involved,” he said.

    From a small boat on the gunmetal waters of the Hudson, weaving among an archipelago of stout barges and giraffe-like cranes, the scale of the work in progress is impressive. The eight-lane bridge — actually two parallel spans — that will stretch across a 3.1-mile breadth of the river between Tarrytown in Westchester County and West Nyack in Rockland County will by some measures be the widest in the world.

    By Christmas, dock builders on floating barges had used hydraulically driven vibrating hammers to pound 28 piles — steel tubes up to six feet in diameter and up to 300 feet long — into the bottom of the Hudson River, some drilled into bedrock, others held by the sheer density of the riverbed muck.

    A thousand piles will eventually be needed, so workers are hustling at a pace of eight piles every two weeks, although they have been slowed by the recent bitter cold. To make sure the piles can hold the weight of the daily traffic — 138,000 cars — workers delicately set a barge on top of the piles, fill it with water until it weighs 7 million pounds, adjust that force with hydraulic jacks, then test the piles for several days to see if any shifting takes place. For each of the four towers that anchor the cables holding up the bridge decks, more than 60 piles will be needed, clustered together like sticks of spaghetti in a cellophane package.

    For those who like to keep track of bridge terminology, the current Tappan Zee is a cantilever truss bridge; the new bridge will be a “cable stay” bridge: Cables anchored by midriver towers will support the weight of the roadway rather than cables anchored to land on both ends.

    Yet with an environmental consciousness that was far less evident when the Verrazano (a suspension bridge) was built, the workers are under firm instructions to respect marine life.

    To soften the underwater sound waves emitted by pile-driving, strong enough to kill fish, workers surround each pile with a “bubble curtain,” a square enclosure fitted with a compressor that produces sound-dampening bubbles. Dredging to enable barges and other craft to enter the relatively shallow waterway was allowed only until Nov. 1 to protect the feeding grounds of the Atlantic and shortnose sturgeon.

    “Three sturgeons have been found dead in the bridge’s vicinity, but that’s not atypical,” said Hayley Carlock, environmental advocacy attorney for the nonprofit conservation group Scenic Hudson.

    The two graceful spans that will take the place of the current deteriorating bridge will be supported by four angled towers, each shaped like a giant harp. The timetable calls for the first 96-foot-wide span, whose piles are rising just north of the current bridge, to open in December 2016. Two months later it is to accommodate eight lanes, four in each direction. Then the current bridge will be torn down and, by summer 2018, a parallel span — 87 feet wide — is scheduled to take its place just 40 feet south of the first span.


    A rendering of the new bridge. The first section is scheduled to open in December 2016.
    Tappan Zee Constructors and HDR Engineering

    Each span will then be reconfigured to accommodate four lanes of cars, with traffic on the northern span heading to Rockland and traffic on the other to Westchester. Each span will also have an express bus lane and emergency shoulders, and the northern span will have a special lane for cyclists and pedestrians.

    When the silvery Tappan Zee opened in 1955, it succeeded in turning sleepy Rockland County into one of the state’s fastest-growing regions, transforming farmland and bungalow colonies into a flourishing suburbia. The opening on Dec. 16 of that year marked the near completion of the 427-mile New York State Thruway from Buffalo to the Bronx, where it connected to the Major Deegan Expressway and Manhattan. In the bridge’s first two hours, The New York Times reported, 2,162 vehicles crossed it, with most drivers paying a 50-cent toll. Its name combined the name of a branch of the Delaware/Lenni Lenape Indians and the Dutch word for “sea.”

    But because of the Korean War, materials were in short supply. The Tappan Zee was built on the cheap. Expected to last only 50 years, the bridge’s expiration date has passed, and its condition makes more than a few commuters anxious. Heated debate began in 1999 on whether hundreds of millions of dollars should be poured into structural repairs or whether a new bridge should be built. In 2011, a decision was reached in favor of a new bridge that would last at least a century and might alleviate the regular traffic jams on a bridge with frequent accidents and no shoulders. The new bridge is estimated to cost $3.9 billion.

    Tappan Zee Bridge Opens for Business in 1955

    A December 1955 article in The New York Times on the opening of the Tappan Zee bridge.


    The project presented major engineering challenges. A single span would have required too great a width to stretch for 3.1 miles, according to officials of New York State Thruway Authority, which owns the bridge, so two spans had to be built. Plans for a commuter rail line, a dream of mass-transit advocates, were shelved as too costly for now. Should the will ever crystallize, officials say a rail span could be squeezed between the two automobile spans.

    Construction is being handled by a consortium of companies experienced in building bridges that have banded together under the name Tappan Zee Constructors.

    To direct the project, the authority has hired Peter Sanderson, 65, the engineer who oversaw the speedy replacement of the Interstate 35 bridge in Minneapolis that collapsed in 2007, killing 13 people. Mr. Capobianco, the project manager, is his deputy. By the time it is finished, 400 engineers will have had a hand in the new bridge, with workers putting in 6 million hours of construction.

    The Tappan Zee Bridge, completed in 1955, was expected to last about 50 years.
    Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times


    Thruway officials say Tappan Zee Constructors will bear most of the risk for cost overruns, a result of legislation Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo signed in 2011.

    The builders are calling on the Left Coast Lifter, one of the world’s largest floating cranes, with a hoisting power of 1,750 metric tons (or as the Thruway authorities like to say, 12 Statues of Liberty). It left Oakland, Calif., just before Christmas, passed through the Panama Canal last week and will take a few weeks to travel up the East Coast.

    The span of the new bridge will slope about half as steeply as the current bridge; the Tappan Zee’s incline is believed to contribute to fender-benders as trucks slow. The bridge will also have all-electronic toll collection, eliminating backups at tollbooths.

    Bottlenecks may not end entirely, Thruway officials concede. Two miles beyond the bridge in Rockland County, there is an uphill slope where the Thruway slims to three lanes from four, a constriction that could occasionally back traffic up to the bridge.

    Because the new bridge will use the current bridge’s landings on the Rockland and Westchester shores, no homes were seized by eminent domain, officials said, though some slivers of private shrub land were needed.

    The new bridge still has yet to be named. It may remain the Tappan Zee. The Thruway Authority’s website talks about a generic “New New York Bridge,” but officials admit that the name is up for grabs. The question will be mulled by a task force that is studying the bridge’s financing, looking at tolls — at $5, the Tappan Zee’s are less than half that of the George Washington Bridge — and other revenue sources. They could recommend selling the naming rights.

    “We’ve heard some background noise that there might be some interest in branding, but there have been no discussions regarding the name of the new bridge,” said Thomas J. Madison, the Thruway’s executive director.

    One caution for anyone wanting to buy the name: The current bridge is officially known as the Governor Malcolm Wilson Tappan Zee Bridge, after the 50th governor of New York, who served only one year. But few drivers invoke his name when giving directions or calling home to explain why they are late.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/20/ny...=nyregion&_r=0

  6. #126
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    Cool JC To Tappen Zee

    Jersey City's port gets a giant visitor
    Monster crane to be used for Tappan Zee replacement


    Jan. 31, 2014


    The Left Coast Lifter, a nearly 400-foot-long monster crane, cruises along the Hudson River on its way to port Thursday in Jersey City. One of the world's largest floating cranes, it will be used in the construction of the new Tappan Zee Bridge, which spans the Hudson in New York state, this spring. / AP

    Written by
    Theresa Juva-Brown
    The Journal News

    JERSEY CITY — Ever so slowly, the colossal machine glided across the water, with a tiny but mighty tugboat pushing it past the Manhattan skyline.

    The Left Coast Lifter, the giant floating crane that will help build the new Tappan Zee Bridge in New York state, arrived in New York Harbor on Thursday and settled into a Jersey City port, where it will stay for several months before it’s brought up the Hudson River.

    Its official name is the Left Coast Lifter — a nod to its first job on the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge project — but Tappan Zee project officials have been calling it the I Lift New York super crane.

    “The crane is arriving just in time for Super Bowl Sunday,” Brian Conybeare, special adviser to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, said at a news conference at the edge of Port Jersey. “It is bigger than a football field, and its boom is longer than a football field as well.”

    Thursday marked the last leg of the crane’s 6,000-mile voyage that began more than a month ago in California and included a trip through the Panama Canal. The crane was folded down and received special protections for the journey.

    “We are very excited to have the crane here on time and with no incident,” said Carla Julian, spokeswoman for Tappan Zee Constructors, the consortium designing and building the new Tappan Zee and the crane’s owner. “The reason we are bringing it up a little early is so we can ensure it’s ready when we are ready to go to work with it in the spring.”

    The one-of-a-kind machine will help TZC crews complete construction tasks more quickly.

    The crane’s incredible size and strength — it can lift 12 times the weight of the Statue of Liberty — will be used to put sections of the new Tappan Zee into place. It will also assist with tearing down the existing Tappan Zee in 2016.

    Tappan Zee project officials hosted a media event in Jersey City to welcome the crane to the East Coast.

    “I’d like to say it got a warm welcome, but it’s pretty cold out here,” Conybeare said Thursday morning, with temperatures in the teens.

    Along the waterfront at the end of Port Jersey Boulevard, reporters gathered in the bitter cold to get the first glimpse of the crane as it traveled through New York Harbor. About 9:15, the outline of the barge and crane appeared in the sun-sparkled water under the Verranzzo-Narrows Bridge, plodding along with the help of a tugboat team from Seattle.

    About an hour later, a tugboat crew from Weeks Marine took over to guide the crane to the Weeks facility nearby, where it will stay until the spring. Weeks Marine has done the dredging of the Hudson River for the project and has numerous cranes at the work site.

    Just after noon, the crane finally neared the shore. The spectacle quietly floated by against the backdrop of the Statue of Liberty and the new 1 World Trade Center.

    A online petition has called for renaming the span for the late folk singer Pete Seeger, who long promoted a cleanup of the Hudson River. Naming the new bridge “would be a fitting tribute to a man who did so much to help improve the mighty Hudson and the towns along its banks,” states the petition, which has more than 1,000 signatures.

    How Seeger’s family members feel about the proposal is unknown; they haven’t weighed in publicly on it. Clearwater, the organization he founded as part of his advocacy for the Hudson, said it had not taken a position on the question, in deference to the family. Riverkeeper, another group that fights for the river’s health, also declined comment.

    http://www.courierpostonline.com/art...-giant-visitor

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    Wrong thread
    Last edited by towerpower123; February 12th, 2014 at 11:25 PM. Reason: delete

  8. #128
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    This Time, Tappan Zee Bridge Project Proceeds With Neighbors in Mind

    By JOSEPH BERGER


    A view of the construction of the new bridge next to the existing Tappan Zee Bridge, crossing the Hudson
    River between Rockland and Westchester Counties. Ron Antonelli for The New York Times


    SOUTH NYACK, N.Y. — This village on the west bank of the Hudson River has never forgotten the original sin: the destruction six decades ago of more than 100 homes and the community’s entire commercial hub to make way for the Tappan Zee Bridge.

    The twin-spanned replacement for that bridge is being built with more sensitivity to the needs and feelings of residents here and in Tarrytown, N.Y., across the river, at the other end of the bridge. The New York State Thruway Authority has tried to stick to the bridge’s current footprint and adapt the existing landing roads on both sides of the bridge, and is still able to say that while a few patches of private scrub and yard have been expropriated, not a single home has been taken against anyone’s will.

    There has been pain nevertheless. Robert J. Wisner, who has lived in South Nyack for 40 years, will soon lose his swimming pool and much of his backyard to eminent domain so the state can build a plaza at the end of a bicycle and pedestrian path.

    The Tappan Zee, the longest bridge in New York, opened in 1955 and was designed to last 50 years. Now work has begun on a bridge to replace it, one that will also be the widest in the world by some measures. Articles in this series are chronicling the construction of the new double-spanned bridge and the people building it.

    In Tarrytown, the bridge will move 100 feet closer to Alice W. Goldberg’s condominium, with all the attendant pile-driving clamor and dust. She has lived there for four years with a somewhat incongruous view of the bridge’s toll plaza alongside a fjordlike riverscape. Her condo complex, the Quay, has a pool and two tennis courts; leisure time there will never be the same.

    The $3.9 billion, eight-lane bridge — the first major crossing built in the New York area in half a century — is inexorably rising. Already Ms. Goldberg, standing at her kitchen window, can see the platforms and enclosures used in shaping the concrete piers for one of the two spans, and all across the breadth of the Hudson a dozen cranes stick out of the river’s surface like colossal flamingoes.

    The original Tappan Zee propelled Rockland and Orange Counties, both west of the Hudson, into the ranks of the fastest-growing suburban regions in the country. The replacement bridge is not expected to create such significant transformations. It is, however, designed to improve traffic flow, and some business groups believe that will lead to an increase in the number of truck-dependent businesses, like warehouses.

    When it comes to the neighbors who will not only have to live with the new bridge but also endure living in a construction site for the next four years, state agencies are proceeding with caution, in contrast to the heavy-handed way property was seized by eminent domain in the early 1950s. (On the Tarrytown side, one large estate was taken, but South Nyack was permanently gutted.)

    “The communication has been much better,” Mayor Bonnie R. Christian of South Nyack said. “They are listening to us. They’ve never done that before.”

    Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s top aide, Lawrence S. Schwartz, has met with Ms. Goldberg in her kitchen and knows many aggrieved homeowners and their problems in detail. Brian W. Conybeare, a former anchor for News 12 Westchester, a local cable station, who became special adviser to the governor for the bridge, has spoken at 300 community meetings. He has given presentations to explain the consequences for the river towns and what the Thruway Authority and its contractor, Tappan Zee Constructors, are doing to ameliorate unpleasant impacts.


    John and Hope Cameron said the state recently cut down several dozen trees between their
    house and the highway to erect a sound barrier, ruining the scenery from their porch and
    leaving their bedroom vulnerable to nighttime construction lights. Ron Antonelli for The New York Times


    “We have to overcome decades of animosity,” he said recently at Nyack College. “We want South Nyack and Tarrytown to welcome this new bridge.”

    The state and its chief contractor have created a $20 million “community benefit” fund. The state is spending $2.5 million of that for sound-dampening windows and doors just for the 89 condo owners of the Quay complex, where two-bedroom apartments sell for $500,000. At least two other housing complexes will get new windows and doors, and $1.7 million was made available on Wednesday for similar soundproofing for 57 private homes.

    Ms. Goldberg, the president of the Quay condo association, said the negotiations had been “tortuous,” involving eight months of wrestling with lawyers. She is disappointed that the state will not pay roughly $150,000 for a see-through plastic dome to shield the pool from dust and noise. State officials say it would be irresponsible to use taxpayer or toll money for such a luxury.

    The state has provided $250,000 to study the potential for turning the core of the Exit 10 interchange into a commercial district that could also serve as a bike path finish line. It is putting up sound barriers where the bridge meets land and plans to outfit two shorefront parks with stationary binoculars so the curious can view the construction. And Tappan Zee Constructors has offered to buy six houses that the state had scheduled for demolition but then reconsidered.

    “We had no legal obligation to help anybody, to buy homes or do a community benefit fund,” Mr. Schwartz said. “The governor is doing it because it’s the right thing to do.”

    But knotty issues are knotty issues, and not all have been resolved. As Mayor Christian, a fourth-generation South Nyacker, said, “Residents are very skeptical because of what happened in 1955.”

    One of the selling points for the new three-mile-long bridge was its bicycle and pedestrian lane with a half-dozen panoramic lookouts. But that lane has turned out to be perhaps the bridge’s most controversial feature. Residents foresee a carnival atmosphere on weekends at the path’s two end points, with throngs of cycling families, food trucks and drivers clogging the on-street parking spaces.

    While the Tarrytown side could accommodate a bike-path plaza and parking area amid office buildings and stores, the South Nyack end is residential. Homeowners there would prefer the state to delay the path until the Thruway’s Exit 10 interchange could be reconstructed as a commercial hub and serve as the terminus for bikes coming off the bridge. That would mean no path until sometime after 2018 when the bridge is completed.

    “A shared-use path is an amazing opportunity to showcase the river villages and this part of the Hudson Valley and the entryway into the Catskills, so we want something we can be proud of,” said Betsy Chollet, a member of the TZ Gateway Alliance, a local group. “But we need a solution that can work for the region.”

    Few will be as personally affected as Mr. Wisner, 72, an architect. He still has his house — the state paid $153,000 for his loss by eminent domain of a spatula-shape slice of his backyard — but in four years he will be living next to a plaza for dismounting bikers along Broadway, one of the village’s main streets.

    “On the Fourth of July, this will be a zoo,” he said. “The number of bikers on Broadway is endless as it is. Imagine more people coming up from the city.”

    He added, “I should open a deli.”

    Some homeowners feel that the prospect of years of construction or life near a bike path has greatly diminished their properties’ value. While the contractor has offered to buy the home of John and Hope Cameron with the price based on the average of three appraisals, the Camerons want the state to take it through eminent domain. That way, they feel, they would get more in moving costs and be more confident they could afford a property of comparable value.

    Most recently, the state cut down a stand of trees between the Cameron house and the highway to erect a sound barrier, ruining the scenery from their porch and leaving their bedroom vulnerable to nighttime construction lights, Ms. Cameron said.

    “We’re in the eye of construction,” she added. “Who’ll buy a house on top of the largest construction project in America?”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/09/ny...=nyregion&_r=0

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    Skeleton of Tappan Zee Bridge’s Successor Begins to Surface in the Hudson

    By JOSEPH BERGERSEPT. 18, 2014
    Inside




    Living City: A Tale of Two Bridges




    Living City: A Tale of Two Bridges

    With thousands of bridges in New York State deemed structurally deficient, there are two choices: repair or rebuild. The 60-year-old Tappan Zee Bridge and the Brooklyn Bridge are the latest examples.
    Video Credit By Melanie Burford and Greg Moyer on Publish Date September 18, 2014. Image CreditÁngel Franco/The New York Times


    TARRYTOWN, N.Y. — The shape of the new Tappan Zee Bridge is emerging from the green-gray waters of the Hudson River.
    Steel piles drilled into the river’s muck and bedrock are beginning to reveal the trail the bridge will take to leap the three miles that separate Westchester and Rockland Counties.
    The Erector Set-like skeleton of the first of 86 pairs of columns that will support the twin-spanned bridge rises 40 feet in the air near the Westchester side, waiting to be entombed in concrete that will be poured from an inventive floating concrete plant.
    “It looks like a fish after the meat has been removed” is the way Darrell Waters, president of Tappan Zee Constructors, the consortium building the bridge for the New York State Thruway Authority, describes it.
    And two massive forms the size of football fields await the concrete to form platforms that will support the four 40-story towers of the bridge’s main span — each platform supporting two towers.



    Less than a year after construction began, the first major bridge to be built in the New York City area in half a century has progressed toward its planned openings: The first span, for two-way traffic, is to be completed in December 2016, and the full bridge, which is not yet formally named, by 2018.


    Piles — essentially steel tubes up to six feet in diameter and up to 300 feet long — are being driven into the river bottom by powerful machine-driven hammers. Credit Ángel Franco/The New York Times “It’s starting to get to an exciting part of the job,” said Tom McGuinness, the construction compliance engineer with the Thruway Authority. “We’re starting to visualize it.”
    There was a setback on Tuesday, when the federal Environmental Protection Agency denied most of a low-interest $511 million loan that the authority had counted on to cover part of the project. (The authority has said it will appeal the decision.) Unless another inventive source of financing is found, the rebuff may mean that higher tolls will be needed to pay off the more conventional bonds the state will have to issue.
    Thomas Madison, the Thruway Authority’s executive director, said in a statement that construction on the project “will not be affected in any way” by the E.P.A.’s decision.

    “The project remains on budget and on schedule and, as we’ve said all along, the intent is to pay for the new bridge using any potential increases above current toll rates at the bridge — not systemwide Thruway toll revenues,” Mr. Madison said.
    Environmental advocates had complained loudly about the E.P.A. financing, contending that it siphoned off funds that should go to water treatment plants around the state.
    21st-Century Span


    • The Tappan Zee, the longest bridge in New York, opened in 1955 and was designed to last 50 years. Now work has begun on a bridge to replace it, one that will also be the widest in the world by some measures. Articles in this series are chronicling the construction of the new double-spanned bridge and the people building it.




    And there have been other complaints. Despite money spent by the Thruway Authority on sound-dampening windows and noise monitors, driving the piles has unleashed pounding reverberations that have annoyed residents of nearby neighborhoods. For a time this summer the authority suspended the pile driving until the contractor could figure out how to proceed more quietly.
    Nevertheless, the authority says that it is proud of its accomplishments, and that it is within its $3.9 billion budget. Officials have been so eager to show off its progress that in six weeks they have twice taken reporters and photographers out on a cramped tugboat to tour the site where 20 construction cranes are employed, looking like a clan of long-necked brontosaurs foraging in a marsh. The fact that the public official who fast-tracked the bridge, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, a Democrat, is running for re-election this year may have fueled the desire for attention.

    The new bridge is what is known as cable-stayed — different from a suspension bridge like the George Washington — because the cables that hold up the steel deck are anchored to the tops of the central span towers rather than to the shore, where anchoring is not always possible if soil conditions are not right. (The current bridge does not use cables at all, and its main span is a cantilever design supported on a framework embedded in the river.) The new bridge, like its predecessor, will stand at one of the widest points of the Hudson, its location determined by political considerations: Anything built within 25 miles of the Statue of Liberty would be controlled by the Port Authority, governed by both New York and New Jersey; the Tappan Zee, just outside the zone, is controlled completely by New York.
    The numbers for the lyrical construction of the new bridge are impressive. Fourteen miles of cable in 192 separate strands will eventually be unspooled, enough to stretch from Tarrytown to the Bronx; the cable will be strung from the main-span towers to carry the steel deck. Before the end of the year, according to Ro DiNardo, the project’s general superintendent, and other officials, the first huge pieces of prefabricated steel deck are to be hoisted into place, the heaviest requiring a giant floating crane, which made its way to New York last winter from Oakland, Calif., through the Panama Canal.
    But first the steel-reinforced towers have to be erected, two for the eastbound span and two for the westbound, each tower made up of a pair of soaring fanlike pylons connected by a crossbeam. Those towers rest on two platforms, called pile caps, each 360 feet long and 14 feet deep, about half submerged, resting on steel piles that have been embedded in the river bottom.


    Steel forms will be filled with concrete to create a platform holding up two of the towers of the bridge's main span. Credit Ángel Franco/The New York Times The forms for these immense platforms have already been constructed in the river and were visible on a mid-September tour. The water inside will be pumped out and heavy steel rebar crisscrossed in place. Then the concrete will be poured, 11,000 cubic yards’ worth. Should the New York Jets decide to play a home game on the platform, it could, theoretically, be done.
    The full bridge will be supported by a total of 86 piers, or columns, most of them to bolster the long approaches to the bridge’s main span. The shortest piers, on the low shore of the South Nyack side, where the water is eight feet deep at low tide, are to rise 50 feet above the waterline; the tallest, near the bluffs of Tarrytown, will rise 130 feet. Unlike the main towers, the approach piers sit on prefabricated concrete tubs weighing 700,000 pounds each.
    In total, 300,000 cubic yards of concrete, 30,000 truckloads, will be needed to build the bridge. To pour all this concrete, Tappan Zee Constructors has built a concrete plant on a 200-foot-long barge that can be ferried to wherever pouring is needed.
    “We can mix the concrete right on the river so we don’t have to worry about concrete getting old,” said Mr. Waters, who has handled large construction projects in the Middle East and Europe.

    The plant has three silos of cement and hoppers filled with the sand and stone to be mixed with it. It can produce 125 cubic yards of concrete per hour. A second plant will be towed over this month or early next month, as more concrete is needed. Officials say the floating plants are also environmentally congenial, greatly reducing the number of trucks that rumble through the residential neighborhoods on the two sides of the bridge.


    The Tappan Zee Bridge and pilings that will underpin its successor. Tom McGuinness, the construction compliance engineer with the Thruway Authority, said, “We’re starting to visualize it.” Credit Ángel Franco/The New York Times

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/19/ny...york.html?_r=0

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    Nice shots, did you get any hassle from rent-a-cops

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    Quote Originally Posted by GordonGecko View Post
    Nice shots, did you get any hassle from rent-a-cops
    I took the closeup shots from the train....

  13. #133

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    that's a lot of steel batman

    What's the latest ETA on the ribbon cutting by the way

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    Sometime mid 2016...

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