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Thread: Bayonne

  1. #1
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Default Bayonne

    Hey does anybody know anything about Bayonne. Post your thoughts about Bayonne.

  2. #2

    Default Bayonne, NJ??!!


  3. #3

    Default Bayonne, NJ??!!

    Yes.

  4. #4
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    Default Bayonne, NJ??!!

    Very Sydney Harboury.

  5. #5
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    Default Bayonne, NJ??!!

    To be honest, I have no idea what Bayonne is all about. Though on the map it looks like a great location, it seems like a place that few pass through. I always thought it was a seedy industrial slum, but I have met a few nice people from there who claim otherwise.

  6. #6

    Default Bayonne, NJ??!!

    I really don't know what you're talking about.
    Bayonne is a nice city in the French Pays Basque where they make delicious cheese and ham.



    http://www.ville-bayonne.fr/bayonne-...es/phototk.asp

    Their chocolate, too, is excellent.

    (I realize that I might be slightly off topic, but I couldn't resist...)


    (Edited by Fabb at 2:36 pm on Aug. 14, 2003)

  7. #7
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    Default Bayonne, NJ??!!

    Bayonne doesn't look that great, but the location is. *They have the new lightrail that takes residents up to JC and Hoboken and there are plans to extend service further south in Bayonne. *Bayonne residents are made fun of by people from the rest of the state, but I don't know why that is.

  8. #8

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    I don't know why everyone else . . . I don't know why I make fun of Bayonne, it's got a lot of good stuff. But it's so easy to do.

    Someone once said people call it the "butt-hole of Hudson County, there's only one way in and out". There is the Staten Island Bridge (I think that's where it leads) and the Bayonne Bridge, but who ever goes through there unless they're visiting friends or family?

    Bayonne is different than most other places in the area, it has one building considered a skyscraper on skyscrapers.com (11 stories or higher. It has a large Industrial sector (but most of it seems to be the clean industry brought about in the 70s) It has a seaport. It doesn't have any places like malls or Movie theatres, (however it does have some strip malls and a bowling place). It's almost like an urban suburb. When the Mayor of Bayonne wanted the MTVA antenna in Bayonne without an observation deck, that didn't help the city's reputation. Especially because it'll be defunct as an antenna once the new WTC plan is complete. Once that happens the former antenna will just be a giant 2,000 foot eyesore on some unkown peninsula on the edge of Bayonne, but that's a different topic. Other than houses of worship, I'm not aware of any architecture that's different than any other places.

    However, Bayonne has its perks. It has multiple "main streets" lined withe healthy buisinesses run by people with pride in their businesses and with integrety. There are good playgrounds and parks (but many are small). I think it has a long park along it's western waterfront. The people who I know who are from Bayonne are among the nicest people I know. In fact I don't know one person from Bayonne who's mean or who'd be undesirable to meet. The houses look nice too.

    I hope there're other people here who can present some more great things about Bayonne. Also, sorry about the large paragraph of Bayonne's downsides, but I guess those're the reasons.

    I'll probably post some pictures of Bayonne later today.

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    Default

    Hysterical Blindness. Good movie.

  10. #10

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    Yaay! It works! I tried uploading Newark pictures and it didn't work, but these do, so that's great!!

    Note: I was wrong, I think, tell me if it works, and if just my computer is messed up. Sorry for the waste of space, and inconvenient page changes if there aren't any pictures showing.




    A medical office.



    It reads " The Peninsula of Business and Technology"



    A church, I should've found out the name.



    Bayonne Municipal Building



    St. Peter & Paul Church



    Bayonne Municipal Building from the front



    Bayonne High School, the sign reads "Designated one of New Jersey's Outstanding Public High Schools"



    Elizabeth Seaport (or Newark) on Bayonne's Western Waterfront



    I wonder what all that sand is for



    Newark's skyline on the left also from Bayonne's West side (it's not as far as it looks) and some bridge on the right. The Bayonne Bridge is the longest steel bridge in the world (or something). I guess it's even longer than the one pictured here.



    Just so you know how long it is.



    Now that's a good picture of the seaport, (and some more of the mysterious sand)

    :?:



    I wonder how nicer this picture would look with a blue sky, or earlier in the day. . . or if Elizabeth (http://skyscrapers.com/re/en/wm/ci/101400/) had a skyline to show for its commerce (where'd that come from?)



    town houses on the water's edge, some tall red thing, what looks like tall lights, the ever famous Bayonne Bridge in the far back ground. And, in front, though it may be hard to see, the people on the penisula seem to be working together to clean litter and garbage from the penisula or the water.

    One of the pictures I was most excited about posting was two waterfront high rise condos I saw. However, I either didn't take it, or the camera deleted it (do I sound like a ditz or what). This changes Bayonne's High-rise count from one, to 3 or more . . .

  11. #11

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    November 16, 2004

    Tom Cruise and Some Martians Take a Liking to Bayonne

    By LEWIS BEALE


    Steven Spielberg and, in background, Tom Cruise at work on "The War of the Worlds."


    Marie Folger at her Bayonne coffee shop with her Tom Cruise photo.

    BAYONNE, N.J., Nov. 12 - Luckily for Marie Folger, there is no Starbucks in town. So one day last month, when Tom Cruise and his entourage were looking for some espresso with steamed milk, a couple of local police officers directed them to Chez Marie, the cozy coffee shop and cafe run by Ms. Folger on East 22nd Street here.

    "I had taken the day off, and my husband was in the store," said Ms. Folger, an outgoing 51-year-old. "He called me and said: 'You better get your butt down here, because Tom Cruise is here. I'm steaming his milk right now, but I'm taking a looong time.' "

    Mr. Cruise was in Bayonne checking out the ambience before beginning work on Steven Spielberg's $200 million adaptation of "The War of the Worlds," H. G. Wells's science-fiction classic about a Martian invasion. Work on the movie, due out from Paramount next summer, has been in progress here and in Newark since the beginning of the month. The production will be filming in Bayonne for only about a week, but crews have been in town since September, scouting locations and building sets. More than anything, however, the mere presence of such a Hollywood blockbuster in a city long thought of as one of New Jersey's backwaters attests to Bayonne's revitalized image and its currently hot status as a filmmaking center.

    Bayonne? Yes, the town across New York Harbor known primarily for its oil refineries and industrial pallor. These days, though, this city of 62,000 boasts an abundance of residential areas, beautiful waterside parks, a terminal for cruise ships and one of the largest sound stages on the East Coast.

    "Most people don't know Bayonne," Mayor Joseph V. Doria Jr. said. "There are no refineries today. It's mostly one- and two-family homes."

    It's also the location of the Military Ocean Terminal, an Army base abandoned in 1995. Since 2000, two large warehouses on the base, each boasting 120,000 square feet of space, have been used as film production centers.

    Only five minutes from the New Jersey Turnpike, 15 minutes from Newark Liberty International Airport and Midtown, and without the parking or security problems of its in-city brethren, the terminal has quickly become a favorite of film companies. In the past four years it has housed 11 major films and television shows, including "A Beautiful Mind," "Far From Heaven" and the HBO series "Oz." In addition to "The War of the Worlds," the warehouses are currently home to Sidney Lumet's latest film, the independent feature "Find Me Guilty," a mob drama starring Vin Diesel and Peter Dinklage.

    "The size and expansiveness" of the terminal are what make it so attractive, said Ray Samitez, construction coordinator on the Spielberg film.

    Jonathan Filley, New York production manager for "The War of the Worlds,'' added: "I know many people who have filmed there over the years. It's a great resource."

    It will not, however, be the location of the apocalyptic scenes of the battle between the earthlings and the Martians; those will be created at George Lucas's special-effects workshop, Industrial Light and Magic, in California. (The 1953 screen version won an Oscar for special effects.)

    "The War of the Worlds" is also here because its screenwriter, David Koepp, decided he "very much wanted to set the remake in a working-class environment - I felt it would be really interesting." That led Mr. Koepp to the Ironbound, the colorful Portuguese-Brazilian area of Newark, which, with its row houses and lively street life, "had a sort of rusting, industrial America look."

    Newark, in turn, led to a few Bayonne locations, particularly First Street and Kennedy Boulevard, a tidy block of immaculate row houses in the shadow of the spectacularly arching Bayonne Bridge. It is here that a World War II veteran and retired government worker named Henry Sanchez opened his door one day in September to a man who said: "Hello, my name is Steven Spielberg. Do you mind if I come in and look around?"

    "He said they were walking around looking at different homes, deciding whether they wanted to shoot in this area," Mr. Sanchez said. "He was with an entourage of about 20 people. I'd never seen them before, and I've never seen them since."

    Mr. Spielberg ("Jurassic Park,'' "A.I.,'' "Minority Report''), who is once again on familiar futuristic turf with "The War of the Worlds,'' must have liked what he saw, because the Sanchez home will be the cinematic residence of Tom Cruise's character. For the past week or so, construction crews have been in the home altering it to fit the production designer's vision (fake walls have been erected in the living room, and all the above-ground swimming pools on the block have been removed and put in storage), while out at the terminal, exact reproductions of Mr. Sanchez's redesigned interiors have been constructed. Not that the workers on this closed and very hush-hush set have apprised him of what's going on.

    "They're very secretive," Mr. Sanchez said. "They come and do their work, and when I asked when they're going to start shooting, they said, 'We don't know.' They're worse than top-secret agents. But they're very nice and courteous."

    It's no secret, however, that Bayonne residents almost unanimously embrace the filmmaking, both for its economic benefits and for the way in which it will, they hope, put the city in a better light. Although one restaurant owner who has done business with film companies in the past said the economic impact was "really not that huge, it's less than 1 percent of my business," Marie Folger said that if "The War of the Worlds" succeeded in bringing "one more person into my shop, then it's worth it."

    It may be worth more than that. Although no one has hard and fast numbers, the film's stage manager, Jeremiah Sellitti, estimated that the production was spending as much as $4,000 a week in petty cash alone (for food, hardware, lumber), a figure that does not include big-ticket items like locally contracted plumbing, heating and electricity.

    But the bottom line is image. Bayonne actually does have a film history, although not an extensive one. The Centaur Film Company, one of the industry's first independents, was based here in the early 1900's. (It eventually became part of Universal Studios.) Sandra Dee was born in Bayonne. And the improbable tale of Chuck (The Bayonne Bleeder) Wepner, the valiant underdog who lasted into the 15th round against Muhammad Ali in a 1975 title fight, became the basis for "Rocky."

    That's all history, however. Nowadays, the locals are hoping the more films that get made in Bayonne, the more the downtrodden image of the city will turn around. They're also hoping that the terminal will eventually be turned into a full-service production center with editing rooms and the like, thereby making it even more attractive to the industry. (There is a proposed mixed-use redevelopment plan for the entire site, which includes such a center.) And even though Mr. Filley, the movie's production manager, said that "you won't change a town's image by making a film there," Bayonne residents tend to feel otherwise.

    "It's just something positive," Ms. Folger said. "You're always hearing the negative. That's what I said to Tom Cruise when he was leaving: 'We get a bad rap here. This is a nice town.' "

    " 'This is a really nice town,' " Ms. Folger said Mr. Cruise responded.

    "I think," she added, "the filmmaking has given us a positive look."

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  12. #12
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Revive Thread!

    'Bayonne Crossing' shopping center gets plan board approval

    Thursday, December 14, 2006
    By GREG HANLON
    JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

    The Bayonne Planning Board has voted unanimously to approve the final site plan for the 10-building, 358,418-square-foot shopping center proposed for a 29-acre tract of land east of Route 440 between New Hook Road and East 22nd Street.

    With the site plan approved, the project's only remaining hurdle is for the state Department of Environmental Protection to approve a plan for environmental cleanup - or remediation - to remove underground petroleum contaminants from the site.

    Mayor Joseph V. Doria Jr., who also serves as a commissioner on the Planning Board, said that the shopping center - dubbed "Bayonne Crossing" - "will attract some well-known, big-box stores to our community, and will add more vitality to the local economy."

    The project is expected to generate approximately 800 jobs, $1.2 million in tax revenue, and between $3 and 4 million in Urban Enterprise Zone sales tax proceeds, a total that would double the amount of UEZ funding the city currently takes in, according to Michael O'Connor, executive director of the Bayonne Development Corporation.

    O'Connor also credited the project with facilitating the cleanup of a contaminated tract of land on which the Standard Oil company - now ExxonMobil - had long operated an oil terminal and refinery.

    "Ultimately, on a site that was destined to be vacant land for generations to come, this project will generate jobs and revenue, and will precipitate further development in the surrounding area," O'Connor said.

    Site work is expected to begin in the spring.

    "By the fall of 2007, we want to be able to open a representative sample of stores," said Eric Alterman, of Cameron Bayonne, LLC, the New York-based developer of the site.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCMAN320 View Post
    The Bayonne Planning Board has voted unanimously to approve the final site plan for the 10-building, 358,418-square-foot shopping center proposed for a 29-acre tract of land east of Route 440...
    10 buildings, 29 acres.

    One building per 2.9 acres.

    Parking lots.

  14. #14
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    Taking on the tear-down trend
    Friday, February 16, 2007 By RONALD LEIR
    JOURNAL STAFF WRITER
    Bayonne's city administration is drafting a new law aimed at rescuing its classic Victorian-style homes - and other one-families - from developers looking to replace them with multi-family construction.
    "We're trying to maintain the character of our community, such as those neighborhoods with houses on big lots where, given the value of the property, a lot of developers are buying the land, tearing down the existing homes and building two-family homes on the lot," Mayor Joseph V. Doria said.
    To make it harder for developers to swing the wrecking ball, Doria said he's asked City Law Director John Coffey II and City Planner John Fussa, in concert with the city Historic Preservation Commission, to draft an ordinance "that will set up a procedure to review demolition permits" for these types of projects.
    "We've definitely seen accelerating trends involving tear-downs of residential structures on one lot, so we're losing a lot of the city's older housing stock to multi-family development," Fussa said. "And that can affect the quality of life in those neighborhoods, so there's been increasing concern and it's emerging as an issue as the city considers updating its master plan."
    As a possible legislative strategy to deal with it, Fussa said the city is exploring any and all of four possible zoning approaches.
    The city may look to impose what Fussa called a "cooling off" period on demolition jobs based on factors "that go beyond health and safety issues" through an "enhanced level of review" by the city engineer and planner, and possibly, by the city's historic preservation and environmental experts.
    Fussa said the city would also be looking at possible amendments to the current residential zoning code for R-1 (one-family) and R-2 (two-family) uses to see whether the code is providing built-in "incentives" for tearing down structures by allowing increased density in certain areas.
    "We want to see if these demolitions are being done on appropriate sites," he said.
    Another strategy being eyed, Fussa said, is possibly requiring a property owner or developer to give the city a more detailed justification for taking down an old home "and what the site would yield as a consequence of that."
    And, Fussa said, the city may require a property owner to post a performance bond for a demolition job that would ensure that sufficient funding is allocated for such safeguards as fencing, landscaping, utility improvements and sidewalks.
    At this point, "we're still in the research phase" of putting together the ordinance, Fussa said.
    He said that suburban communities such as Montclair, Westfield, Metuchen and Long Hill Township have been grappling with zoning issues involving older homes on larger lots, and Bayonne would survey how they've dealt with that.

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    Green light for condo project
    Monday, April 02, 2007 By RONALD LEIR
    JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

    A downsized "Waterford at Bayonne" received a green light from the Bayonne Planning Board Wednesday night.
    Only board member Alice K. Lotosky dissented, saying the condo project was too big for the downtown neighborhood - even after the developer scaled down the development at the southern end of Kennedy Boulevard from 144 to 84 units due to market conditions.
    "To me it shows a lack of confidence by the developer that they're going to sell out the units," Lotosky said.
    After hearing testimony from Jason Kaplan, president of The Kaplan Companies of Highland Park, and his experts, the board voted 8-1 to okay the site plan for 144 units even though the current plan is to build 84 units.
    Kaplan and his attorney, Robert Cavanaugh, told the board the project would proceed in two phases: the first 48 units will be built in the site's northern section, closest to West Third Street, and the next 36 units will rise in the area closest to West Second Street. No construction timetable was given. The site will accommodate 104 parking spaces which - with the board's consent - will be slightly undersized.
    "The Phase 1 area is clean (environmentally) but remediation needs to be done in the Phase 2 section because there's still some oil spilled from the prior owner," Cavanaugh said.
    A traffic expert's study paid for by Kaplan found no justification for a traffic signal proposed for Kennedy Boulevard and West Second Street. The Hudson County Planning Board isn't contesting that finding, City Planner John Fussa said. There will be driveway access to the site via Second and Third streets, he said.
    Kaplan's plans call for 72 two-bedroom units, eight one-bedrooms and four three-bedrooms.
    After it's built, Waterford at Bayonne should generate $520,000 in annual municipal and school tax revenues, Cavanaugh said.

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