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Thread: "You can't take pictures here" - Restrictions on photography

  1. #196
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Power trips backed by ignorance.

    These things need to be clearly stated and listed somewhere so, even when ignorance still prevails, you can whip out the document listing areas that prohibit use of such equipment and have them read through it.

    By the time they are finished looking, your exposure should be done (unless you are doing time lapse.....)

  2. #197

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    You get harassed when using a tripod because you're visible, it takes time to set up, and ultimately, it's against the law without a permit.

    I've never had a problem when using a clamp, but you have to be smart. Pick your spot. If it's a pole, lean against it, compose, and take test shots. When you're ready, clamp the camera and get it done. By the time anyone notices you, you'll be done.

  3. #198
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Or just wait 10 years until the technology advances enough to be able to have a set point and remove the need for any kind of support.

    (They already have things that help reduce jitter and bob on video cameras....)




    Zippy - Stealth Photographer.

    Dun dun DAAAAAAA!

  4. #199

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    Clamps are cheaper than VR (vibration reduction) and IS (image stabilization) lenses.

  5. #200

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    A snapshot of our times


    By George F. Will, Published: January 18

    LOS ANGELES

    Shawn Nee, 35, works in television but hopes to publish a book of photographs. Shane Quentin, 31, repairs bicycles but enjoys photographing industrial scenes at night. The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department probably wishes that both would find other hobbies. Herewith a story of today’s inevitable friction between people exercising, and others protecting, freedom.

    When the Los Angeles Police Department developed a Suspicious Activity Report program, the federal government encouraged local law enforcement agencies to adopt its guidelines for gathering information “that could indicate activity or intentions related to” terrorism. From the fact that terrorists might take pictures of potential infrastructure targets (“pre-operational surveillance”), it is a short slide down a slippery slope to the judgment that photography is a potential indicator of terrorism and hence photographers are suspect when taking pictures “with no apparent aesthetic value” (words from the suspicious-activity guidelines).

    One reason law enforcement is such a demanding, and admirable, profession is that it requires constant exercises of good judgment in the application of general rules to ambiguous situations. Such judgment is not evenly distributed among America’s 800,000 law enforcement officials and was lacking among the sheriff’s deputies who saw Nee photographing controversial new subway turnstiles. (Subway officials, sadder but wiser about our fallen world, installed turnstiles after operating largely on an honor system regarding ticket purchases.) Deputies detained and searched Nee, asking if he was planning to sell the photos to al-Qaeda. Nee was wearing, in plain view, a device police sometimes use to make video and audio records of interactions with people, and when he told a deputy he was going to exercise his right to remain silent, the deputy said:

    “You know, I’ll just submit your name to TLO (the Terrorism Liaison Officer program). Every time your driver’s license gets scanned, every time you take a plane, any time you go on any type of public transit system where they look at your identification, you’re going to be stopped. You will be detained. You’ll be searched. You will be on the FBI’s hit list.”

    Nee is not easily discouraged — the first day he took photographs of street life, one of his subjects punched him — and has a bantam rooster’s combativeness when it comes to exercising his rights. He exercised them again, successfully, when police told him to stop photographing during an incident while he was standing next to Shania Twain’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

    Quentin, who finds aesthetic — and occasional monetary — value in photographs of industrial scenery at night, was equally persistent when deputies ordered him to stop taking pictures, lest they put his name on a troublesome FBI list. He was on a public sidewalk, using a large camera on a tripod, photographing an oil refinery at 1 a.m. He has a master’s degree in fine arts from the University of California at Irvine, so there.

    Quentin — who in another incident was detained for 45 minutes in the back of a squad car — and Nee are not the only photographers who have collided with law enforcement. In conjunction with a Long Beach Post story on distracted drivers, a photographer went to a busy intersection to take pictures of people texting and talking on hand-held phones while driving. A courthouse was in the background; deputies called it a “critical facility,” so his picture-taking was “suspicious activity.” He was given a pat-down search, and deputies demanded to see the pictures he had taken.

    On behalf of such photographers, Peter Bibring of the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California has filed a complaint alleging violations of the First Amendment (photography as an expressive activity; freedom of the press is constitutionally guaranteed) and Fourth Amendment (unreasonable searches of persons and their cameras).

    Bibring, not a stereotypical ACLU fire-breather, is sympathetic about the difficult decisions law enforcement officers must make concerning the shadowy threat of terrorism. “Points of friction,” he says equably, “are inevitable.”

    As are instances of government overreaching in the name of security. Most seasoned law enforcement professionals, however, have sufficient judgment to accommodate the fact that online opportunities for the dissemination of photographs mean lots of people can plausibly claim to be photojournalists.

    Furthermore, digital cameras — your cellphone probably has one — are so inexpensive and ubiquitous that photography has become a form of fidgeting: Facebook users upload 7.5 billion photos every month.

    This raises reasonable suspicions not of terrorism but of narcissism, which is a national problem but not for law enforcement.

    georgewill@washpost.com

    © The Washington Post Company

  6. #201
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    Clamps are cheaper than VR (vibration reduction) and IS (image stabilization) lenses.

    Actually, I was referring more to digital means.

    I have heard they have devices now that can take a picture w/o focus and let you choose your focal length/DOF/etc later. i would imagine that digital image stabilization will soon come to the point that the camera could detect and decode (by taking reference points and time signatures) the motion of the camera through the exposure time rather than just a cumulative sum. Instead of a 1/30 second exposure, for instance, the camera would record the input as individual frames at 1/1000 of a second and reconstruct an image based on that.....


    (BTW, I am not disagreeing about the clamp!!! )


    Nee was wearing, in plain view, a device police sometimes use to make video and audio records of interactions with people,


    It is a shame, but that is what we are beginning to need in order to protect our rights.

    Most incidents of police misconduct are not seen by anyone but the victim and the police themselves.

  7. #202
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    I like this Shawn Nee guy, has some real balls on him and does not bend in front of heavy intimidation. That threat to put you on a watch list is no small thing either, even if you're exonerated for your supposed picture taking crime against the homeland, you may end up with a lifetime of missed flights, heavy handed patdowns, and regular incidents of harassment


  8. #203
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Most of these things do not have one particular Achilles heel. Taking a long distance photo of a bridge will tell you all you need to know about the steel-work when combined with a few passes across it.

    And subways? You do not need a video, unless you are shipping in agents blind to do a "mission".

    Our infrastructure was not designed against destructive means. It was designed to do its job through time and exposure.

    Forbidding pictures of it will do jack-poop against hostile means.

  9. #204
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Who knew?

    Lincoln Center's Official Rules for Street Style Photographers

    RACKED NY
    February 13, 2012

    Every year, the scene outside Lincoln Center gets a little more frenzied as more and more aspiring street-style photographers dash around trying to catch that perfect shot. If you work inside the tent, you'll need to have credentials from Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week. But what are the official rules for photography and videography outside the tents?

    We got the facts straight from Lieutenant Sammy Muñoz, who is running security for the event. Because Lincoln Center has a copyright on all the buildings in the plaza, you usually need a permit to take any photo/video footage. Yet, during Fashion Week, handheld cameras are allowed. Handling tripods is trickier ...

  10. #205

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    http://animalnewyork.com/2013/photog...n-in-bushwick/
    Photographer Arrested for Taking Photos of a Police Station…
    in Bushwick


    By Kyle Petreycik | June 20, 2013 - 01:00PM

    Last Saturday afternoon photographer, Shawn Randall Thomas was arrested for photographing a police station in Bushwick. Thomas was allegedly taking photos of the station for over an hour prior to his encounter with the frustrated police officer seen in the video below. Thomas says that he was unlawfully arrested and has filed a formal complaint against the police regarding the incident. While it may not be entirely clear why Thomas was taking so many photos of the building, who cares — it’s not illegal.
    “I was surprised at the manner that it happened,” Thomas said, describing his experience. “I think at this point all cops know it’s legal to take pictures.”
    However, this continues to be an ongoing problem seeing as the NYPD has been discouraging against photographers for quite some time. In other words, cops are always ****ing with photographers.


  11. #206

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    Maybe he was illustrating what a dump that station is? Either way, the cops had no need to walk out and harass him. If an artist set up and easel and painted the station all day would they be as bothered?

    I could smell the roids on that last cop from here btw.

  12. #207

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    "I was surprised at the manner that it happened, Thomas said, describing his experience. “I think at this point all cops know it’s legal to take pictures.”
    I checked YouTube for responses to the video, but the uploader disabled comments. Maybe a good reason for that.

    This guy blew it from the start; he was immediately confrontational, and the excuse that he was surprised is a little thin. He was wrong when he said, "It's none of your business;" it is their business. Police officers are empowered to ask questions - of anyone. You don't have to be doing something unlawful. The complaints about stop & question by the police center around profiling particular groups, not the overall practice.

    If he was looking for an incident, he should have turned the interview around and asked, "Am I doing something wrong?" That changes the dynamic, and puts the police officer on the defensive, now having to explain why he's out there.

    The video doesn't help street photographers; instead makes us look unreasonable.

  13. #208
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    Bumpity Bump...

    Why is there a ban on photography at most city halls in this region?

  14. #209

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
    Bumpity Bump...

    Why is there a ban on photography at most city halls in this region?
    Is there an official "ban" on photography: or is it just a case of officers/guards feeling empowered to infringe on the individual rights and privacy of a citizen taking photos. There seems to be a lot a grey areas in the law : as in the case of the photographer at the Bushwick police station getting 'unlawfully arrested' . I think it is silly to ban photography in the subway - but since it is against the law, I observe the "ban"....

    I have never heard that photography is banned on the grounds of city halls: but that may be the case.

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