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Thread: Gansevoort Market Historic District Designated

  1. #91
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    From Scuzzy To Chic, How Meatpacking Evolved Since 1985

    by Hana R. Alberts




    [West 14th Street in 1985 (left) and today (right). All photos by Brian Rose.]

    Photographer Brian Rose has grown accustomed to chronicling urban change, one neighborhood at a time. Two years after producing a photo series with side-by-side shots of the Lower East Side of 1980 and today, he's done the same with the Meatpacking District (h/t Vanishing NY). Rose originally turned his lens to the area in 1985, well before gentrification took hold: "In the morning the meat-packing district was a vast open air scene of carnage. Sides of beef were hung from hooks that slid along overhead conveyors. Men in bloodied white coveralls grappled with the carcasses. ... As evening approached another kind of meat market took over—this one human trade–as prostitutes prowled the empty streets, many of them transvestites, overly tall females tottering about on high heels, while men in black leather sought the anonymous doors of sex clubs."




    [Washington Street in 1985 (top) and today (bottom).]

    The general feel of the neighborhood didn't really change till the late 90s, as Jeremiah Moss of Vanishing New York so neatly describes, when artists started crowding in for cheap rent and a few eateries opened to which trendsetters flocked. A decade passed. Now that the neighborhood is chockablock with top-label fashion boutiques, brunch spots with outdoor seating, art galleries, and the High Line, Rose decided to capture the modern-day equivalents of his snaps from 28 years ago.




    [Hudson and 14th Street in 1985 (top) and today (bottom).]

    The before-and-after documentation of ritizified areas has been done before, of course, with neighborhoods like Tribeca and many others proving ripe for this kind of treatment.




    [Washington Street in 1985 (top) and today (bottom).]

    There's no clearer way to illustrate the passage of time, or the wiles of urban development, as Moss summarizes: "Brian Rose's photos tell the story of the Meatpacking District's massive shift, one photo pairing at a time—from quiet to crowds, low-rise to high-rise, rusted awnings to fresh coats of paint, meat houses to high-end boutiques, clunkers to luxury cars, poultry trucks to artisanal ice-cream trucks."

    Brian Rose: New York/Meatpacking District (Then and Now) [official]
    Meatpacking Before & After [Jeremiah's Vanishing NY]
    Photographer Brian Rose's 30-Year Project Documents Changing Face of LES [Curbed]
    Visit the Rundown, Pre-High Line MePa of the 1990s [Curbed]
    Tribeca's Radical Transformation Highlighted In Old Photos [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0..._1985.php#more

  2. #92

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    From scuzzy to chic to jumped the shark?

  3. #93

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    So it's on the decline?

  4. #94
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Not if you like cupcakes and ice cream cones.

  5. #95

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    ...overpriced/rated cupcakes and cones.

  6. #96

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    From a real estate/profitability standpoint, not at all.

    As a place that has any edge to it? Yeah, probably. It's been fully tamed.

    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    So it's on the decline?

  7. #97

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    This place used to be a rank, disgusting hole. Now, it's very beautiful.

    I remember going to a party here 20 years ago and walking outside and seeing transvestites, druggies, and other thugs. Now, at 2:00 a.m., the area is filled with beautiful young women navigating the cobblestones in high heels.

    That being said, I can't wait for that crappy Interstate Meat Co. to vacate.

  8. #98

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    You're correct, it looks much better now. But it was the juxtaposition of the clubbers, bikers, meatpakers, and tranny hookers that gave the place it's edge.

    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    This place used to be a rank, disgusting hole. Now, it's very beautiful.

    I remember going to a party here 20 years ago and walking outside and seeing transvestites, druggies, and other thugs. Now, at 2:00 a.m., the area is filled with beautiful young women navigating the cobblestones in high heels.

    That being said, I can't wait for that crappy Interstate Meat Co. to vacate.

  9. #99
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    It is like all the other trendy places in town. I remember working on an independent production in Alphabet City a good 20 years ago and not feeling very comfy getting off the subway and walking alone at night there.

    Now? I can't afford to walk there...

    The industrial area in Jersey City with the squatters in the old warehouses. Uber-chic... now they have been bought out, shoved out, and condo-ized. Everyone wants cool, but people will only pay for "clean" cool... which really is not that cool anymore...

  10. #100

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    The Pastis site has been leased to the furniture chain, Restoration Hardware. Three floors will be added.

    Another big mistake in what's supposed to be the neighborhood's piazza. The renovation a block north looks nice, but the restaurant is upstairs. Sephora adds little to the street atmosphere. Pastis was indoor-outdoor, noisy - just what was needed. No residents to complain. Now a furniture store. Fits right in.



    There's word that Pastis may reopen somewhere else in the neighborhood, possibly around the corner on Gansevoort St

    The Gansevoort Market


  11. #101

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    Walking is still free. Eating and drinking, on the other hand....

    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    It is like all the other trendy places in town. I remember working on an independent production in Alphabet City a good 20 years ago and not feeling very comfy getting off the subway and walking alone at night there.

    Now? I can't afford to walk there...

  12. #102

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    It may be getting Midtown-esque businesses, but the title is over the top.

    Is the Meatpacking District the Next Midtown?

    Posted Today, April 1, 2015 By Dana Schulz


    Rendering of 860 Washington Street, via James Carpenter Design Associates

    We tend to think of the Meatpacking District as more of an after-hours or weekend destination for cocktails and shopping, but a piece in the Times today looks at the “influx of office space and more” moving into the neighborhood.

    In addition to the much-anticipated opening on May 1st of Renzo Piano’s new Whitney Museum along the High Line, a James Carpenter-designed 10-story glass commercial tower and Samsung’s six-story flagship building are taking shape across from the Standard Hotel. And let’s not forget about Pier 55, the $130 million futuristic floating park that is expected to break ground in 2016 off West 14th Street. With all of these new cultural attractions that will undoubtedly attract tourists, coupled with big-name companies joining the likes of Google in the area, is the Meatpacking District the new Midtown?


    Rendering of 837 Washington Street via Morris Adjmi Architects


    The James Carpenter-designed 860 Washington Street will replace a low-scale meat-cooler facility, the building type that once dominated the industrial area. The first floor will house retail space to be leased for $600/square foot; by comparison, the average ground-floor retail space is about $340/square foot, according to Karen Bellantoni of brokerage company RKF. The second floor will also boast retail and open directly to the High Line for $300/square foot. The upper floors will be leased out as office space. The developers, Property Group Partners in partnership with Romanoff Equities, hope to attract tenants from the finance and law fields, traditionally associated with Midtown. This past summer, Samsung leased the entire building at 837 Washington Street, the Morris Adjmi-designed glass and steel trapezoidal structure built on top of a historic brick building. Large tech companies such as this are also more commonly found in Midtown, with their smaller counterparts heading to Union Square.


    Rendering of the new Pastis building via BKSK Architects

    Even the neighborhood’s local restaurants and bars, which became synonymous with the area during the Cosmo-drinking reign of Sex and the City, are being replaced with high-end retail. For example, the famed French bistro Pastis is being replaced with a Restoration Hardware, and the building is getting a glass topper by BKSK Architects.


    Gansevoort Plaza in the Meatpacking District, via CityRealty

    Some fear that the move toward commercial buildings will affect the historic character of the Meatpacking District. Andrew Berman, Executive Director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, who opposed the design for 860 Washington Street, told the Times: “This next stage of its evolution to a high-end office district I fear will make the meatpacking district feel even more indistinguishable from Midtown. There is no denying that the district has traveled a long way from its workingman roots, and there is no turning the clock back.” However, Stuart Romanoff, a vice chairman at Cushman & Wakefield, said: “Tenants today want the ability to attract employees, they want lifestyle, they want entertainment, they want the restaurants, they want the hospitality and they want the park. The unique thing about the meatpacking district is it has all those elements converging.”

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