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Thread: Brooklyn Bridge Park - by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates

  1. #631
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Park enters a new cycle

    By RICH CALDER

    Brooklyn Bridge Park is about to make a key connection.

    Within the next week, a new bicycle and pedestrian pathway will connect the open bookends of park space at Pier 1 and Pier 6 -- almost entirely on the site of the planned 1.3-mile waterfront park in Brooklyn, officials said.

    It will stretch roughly 15 blocks from Atlantic Avenue to Old Fulton Street.

    A four-block stretch of the new path recently surfaced, running north from Pier 6 around the One Brooklyn Bridge Park condo complex before turning onto a barricaded two-way lane on Furman Street, from Joralemon Street until Montague Street.

    http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/p...#ixzz0x8nwMrFK

    http://www.nypost.com/p/blogs/brookl...j0BW8hERJqMveO

  2. #632
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    Dude, The BBP Bike Path Is Open!


    In its story this morning, The Brooklyn Paper reported that the interim bike and pedestrian path through the unfinished portion of Brooklyn Bridge Park would open next week. (That's also what The Post said yesterday in its follow-up to our breaking the bike path news on Wednesday.) Well, it turns out we won't have to wait that long! A tipster just sent in these photos showing that it's already open. Alright!



    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...the_bbp_bi.php

  3. #633

  4. #634

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    Why is there a fence around the water?

  5. #635

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    To add some texture and reflections to photographs

  6. #636
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    To keep the geese out?

  7. #637

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    08.25.2010

    Brooklyn Bridge Park

    There is a balance between brilliant and boring in NYC parks,
    and Thomas de Monchaux finds this one almost gets it right



    Brooklyn Bridge Park struggles with being both human scale and monumental.
    Courtesy MVVA


    Sometimes allegory writes itself. Here, it’s the removal of the futuristic stainless-steel playground climbing domes at the Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates– designed Brooklyn Bridge Park. Following the opening of the park’s Pier 1 first phase in April 2010, the domes scorchingly overheated in early summer sunshine. Their replacement by a direly anodyne but liability-proof dollhouse structure could stand for the sensible return of quasi- traditional designs after modernist overreach, or for a failure of imagination and ambition, in which the optimistically risk-taking formal and functional intelligence that is modernism’s timeless legacy is abandoned in favor of the complacently picturesque.

    The design of parks and playgrounds in New York City seems currently torn between these two impulses. On the one hand, there are projects like David Rockwell’s Imagination Playground, a Constructivist Legoland just opened at the Burling Slip near the South Street Seaport. On the other, there are developments like the recent renovation inflicted on Washington Square Park, in which the once superbly sensitive prospect-and-refuge modulations of the park’s multi-level ground plane, and the once lively handling of its historically off-kilter plan (developed by polymath designer Robert Nichols in a community-driven 1971 project) have been flattened by a tightly-wound ersatz-historical pastiche of windswept symmetry, bench-shaped benches and fence-shaped fences, from which tiny tidy bits of lawn can be surveilled, but not much else.



    A new playrgound at Pier 6, with Red Hook and Governor's Island beyond.


    Brooklyn Bridge Park would appear to be safely in the first camp. To be arrayed when complete across some 65 acres of Brooklyn’s former shipping piers, it continues for the outer boroughs such large-scale waterfront reclamations as Manhattan’s Hudson River Park and Harlem Piers Park—in this case financially initiated and sustained, not without controversy, by the residential and hotel development of six adjacent parcels with priceless skyline and river views.

    Much of Pier 1 is unimpeachable. A robust vocabulary of galvanized steel, maritime wood, asphalt paving, cable fencing, and other no-nonsense materials hold their own against a tough urban setting in the shadow of the BQE. Behind the shoulder of a steep hill, a cascade of granite steps, salvaged from nearby Roosevelt Island, forms an amphitheater and climactic overlook high above the East River. Thirty-five-foot telephone poles become totemic tree trunks and laconic lighting uprights. A sinuously sloping ridgeline provides ramped tree-lined pathways that delay and reveal views of city and water. A broad waterfront promenade recalls the one far above in Brooklyn Heights.

    Joggers and bench-sitters enjoying the promenade at sunset.


    A complex three-dimensional problem of physical and visual occupation has been methodically and successfully solved, with crisp detailing pleasingly combining industrial manufacture and contemporary élan. Still to come are a rainwater runoff pond, a reconstructed salt marsh, and a boat slip. On a recent Friday afternoon, the park was densely and delightedly occupied by diverse constituencies—including an intrepid group of soccer players who had miniaturized and adapted their game to fit into the mostly concave hollow of the main north-facing lawn.

    That miniaturization speaks to one challenge facing the Pier 1 park, which is scale: Mediating its 9.5 acres between the scale of the human body and the scale of nearby infrastructural icons like the Brooklyn Bridge, Pier 1 has chosen to be a little-big park, rather than a big-little one. What this means is that in the cumulative effect of its many small hills and valleys, switchbacks, and meadows, it can feel slightly like a three-quarters-scale model of itself: packed with beautiful and effective features, and almost continually delightful, but without a lot of room to breathe or improvise. At Brooklyn Bridge Park, that room will, of course, eventually arrive with the continuing development of the adjacent five piers, which will provide full-size indoor and outdoor sports fields, event spaces, and miles of trails and lawns.


    A cove created by the former pilings of Pier 2 adjacent to Pier 1.


    And yet this tendency toward dense specificity of activity can risk suppressing the imaginative improvisation, drift, opportunism, serendipity, and loosely counter-programmatical use of space that are the greatest gifts of playgrounds and parks to their users. The new Washington Square Park fails so profoundly because, unlike the old, it encourages the narrowest one-to-one mapping between object and event: a hospitably curving edge calibrated along a shift in ground level can be a bench, a bed, a stage, a gameboard, a skate ramp, a soap box. A faux-Victorian bench is a bench is a bench.

    A sign at the Pier 1 playground outlaws, along with amplified sound and smoking, “using playground equipment in an unsafe or unintended fashion.” Safety matters. It’s that “unintended” that worries. And yet somewhere there’s a tipping point in which the regulation of space required by a density of narrowly single-use features starts to betray the magnificent liberties of unintended consequences, that, ever since Richard Dattner brought the Adventure Playground to Central Park in the 1960s, has been the city’s contribution to play and to public space.

    Thomas de Monchaux

    Copyright © 2003-2010 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC.

  8. #638

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    Returned to the north section of the park on Sunday. Big difference from when it opened months ago.

    All the asphalt pathways have been topped with the same sort of crushed stone material used at new pedestrian spaces like Madison Square.




    Wetlands. Dragonflies already like it.



    Tidal pool. Cuts in the rocks at high tide level allow sea water to enter.


    Boat launch




    Pier 2. Spiral pool


    Along the temporary bikeway, you get a sense of howe big this park will be.

  9. #639

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    It's the post-Olmsted school of landscape architecture: artfully disheveled.

    "Are those weeds or did someone plant them?"

    Like the High Line: very nice.

  10. #640

  11. #641
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    NEWS ANALYSIS: City Envisions Full-Fledged Re-use for Tobacco Warehouse

    Some See It as a Charming Relic, But Change Is Coming Nonetheless

    by Dennis Holt

    BROOKLYN BRIDGE PARK — Brooklyn Bridge Park's long-anticipated Request for Proposals (RFP) to convert the historic but roof-less 19th century Tobacco Warehouse within the new waterfront park into a cultural or educational center - with a new roof may be coming soon.

    full story at Brooklyn Eagle

  12. #642

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    With the demo of the Purchase Building [mixed feelings about this], work underway on the plaza under the BB, and renovation of Empire-Fulton State Park, which I think will be folded into BBP.



    Tobacco Warehouse photo here.

  13. #643

  14. #644
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    Artists got illegal boot

    NY POST
    By RICH CALDE
    October 5, 2010

    The head of Brooklyn Bridge Park was caught on video ordering a pair of artists looking to hawk their wares in the new urban oasis to take a hike -- unaware that art vending in city parks is legal.

    Regina Myer, president of the city development corporation that runs the waterfront park, can be seen in the video, which was posted on YouTube after the embarrassing Sept. 25 exchange at Pier 1, telling Brooklyn artists E.K. Buckley and Sarah Valarie to pack up their merchandise and get out because they didn't have a permit.

    The city yesterday confirmed Myer erred.

    Copyright 2010 NYP Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.

    ***


  15. #645

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    Gotta love the YouTube.

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