View Poll Results: Who Will Win the 2008 AL Penant?

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  • Tampa Bay Rays

    2 14.29%
  • Boston Red Sox

    0 0%
  • New York Yankees

    10 71.43%
  • Chicago White Sox

    1 7.14%
  • Minnesota Twins

    0 0%
  • Detroit Tigers

    1 7.14%
  • Los Angeles Angels

    0 0%
  • Texas Rangers

    0 0%
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Thread: Red Sox v. Yankees

  1. #31
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    You may have won this battle, Red Sox, but the war is not yet over.

  2. #32

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    I want to see the Red Sox win. The Yankees have won so many World Series and ALCS pennants that I just have to see somebody else win.

    However, I wouldn't bet $51 dollars on the Red Sox. The Yankees are almost sure to win Game 7.

    This will confirm my worst fears of a Yankees-Marlins World Series.

  3. #33

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    Most New Yorkers (except irrational people who go to games in Flushing) are comfortable with the situation over the last 85 years.

    TV is dreading a Red Sox-Marlin series. The natural for TV would have been Yanks-Cubs, 2 big cities with rivalries beyond baseball.

    or

    Red Sox- Cubs. 7th game, bottom of the ninth, Cubs up a run, bases loaded, 3-2 count to Nomar. Here's the pitch.....and the universe suddenly implodes.

    That goat is pretty tough. We'll see what the Babe can do tonight.

  4. #34
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    I have to say, this series has me at wits end - the stress! I've bitten my nails to the nub and gone all gray. If I don't have a heart attack before the 9th inning it will be a miracle.

    Play ball!

  5. #35

  6. #36
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    Roger, did you do it AGAIN? :shock: :shock:

  7. #37
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    I have just one thing to say to you Boston fans:

    :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P

  8. #38

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    Okay, now on to the southernmost suburb. :wink:

  9. #39
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    I can't even think of Florida yet while there is still euphoria over last night's game. WHAT A GAME! What a fun night in the city, too, especially after midnight. The streets were empty, the bars - packed and loud. Well, after the 7th inning they were. Like game 7 wasn't enough, extra innings?! Like the stress wasn't enough already? I have to admit, it didn't look good for the Yanks, most of the game was pretty depressing. But once the game was tied, it became a pressure-cooker, (the beer started flowing), and in the end it was one for the ages. Aaron Boone? Go figure. Unbelievable series!


    Okay, now for our southernmost suburb.........

  10. #40

    Default Go Marlins

    Aaron Boone? Go figure. Unbelievable series!
    "NEXT YEAR," he declared in self mocking heartbroken irony.

  11. #41
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    My dorm floor went CRAZY when the score tied, and even more so when the Yankees won.

  12. #42

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    Ugh...I wanted to see a curse lifted.
    Wasn't Aaron Boone formerly on the Cincinnati Reds?

    Anyway, it might be good to lock this thread and start a Yanks vs. Marlins thread. In fact, I will make one now.

  13. #43

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    Of all the postseason games I've been to, this was the most tense. Even with the score 4-0, the atmosphere was that every play was important. When Mussina came in with runners on 1st and third and no out, and struck out Veritek and got Damon to hit into a DP, from the crown reaction you'd think the score was tied. A pressure cooker till the end.
    The subway ride home was a blast.

    Grady Littlle now takes his place with Johnny Pesky, Mike Torrez, Bill Buckner, et al, as a casualty of The Curse.

    Spiritual intervention may have more to do with The Stadium. There's something about the old ballpark - you can feel it.

    Right now, I can't give a thought to Tropical Fish.

  14. #44

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    October 18, 2003

    Miracle at the Bambino's House (7 Letters)

    To the Editor:

    Re "Old Hero, and Newest, Carry New York to the Series" (front page, Oct. 17):

    As parents, we face many and often complex challenges in raising our children. The teenage years in particular can confound us and turn our hair gray.

    Despite our best efforts at mature guidance, our own teenage daughter strayed onto a path certain to cause her pain and heartbreak. This year, for reasons known only to her, my daughter became a Red Sox fan. Now she suffers with all the others who follow this road.

    We do our best as parents, and of course we will be there for her in her time of suffering. Go Yankees!

    DON BADGLEY
    New Paltz, N.Y., Oct. 17, 2003



    To the Editor:

    The Red Sox loss to the Yankees in the American League Championship Series (front page, Oct. 17) had all the inevitability of a Greek tragedy.

    But for those of us who live in Boston, the advantage of "Oedipus Rex" is that we only have to watch it once.

    PETER KUGEL
    Cambridge, Mass., Oct. 17, 2003



    To the Editor:

    I know that fans in New York are really excited about the World Series featuring their Yankees (front page, Oct. 17). But those in the hinterlands would have loved a Cubs-Red Sox Series.

    I don't think that I'll be watching, even if one of those Series games is Roger Clemens's last start ever. Sorry, the magic is gone.

    CARRIE P. SWING
    South Charleston, W.Va.
    Oct. 17, 2003



    To the Editor:

    Re "Old Hero, and Newest, Carry New York to the Series" (front page, Oct. 17): Ah, sweet victory!

    I've been a Yankee fan since seventh grade in Kansas City in the late 40's, when the Kansas City Blues were a farm team for the Bronx Bombers.

    I will concede the possibility that someday, Boston might break the curse of the Bambino and go on to the World Series, but never against New York. I hope that the Babe is smiling today.

    PAT GOODSON
    St. Mary's, Kan., Oct. 17, 2003



    To the Editor:

    Re "Red Sox Come Close Again but Still No Champagne" (column, Sports pages, Oct. 17):

    This is an example of the need for a consolation playoff game format, like that used in World Cup soccer.

    That way, if the Cubs and the Red Sox had played each other, someone would have to win and help lift the familiar fog of misery that has settled over Chicago and New England.

    DIMITRI PRYBYLSKI
    Washington, Oct. 17, 2003



    To the Editor:

    Re "Red Sox Come Close Again but Still No Champagne" (column, Sports pages, Oct. 17):

    Curses aside, there is a good scientific reason for our history. The Red Sox have the most distinctive ballpark in the major leagues, featuring the Green Monster, the outfield wall that haunts us.

    The Red Sox play two different types of baseball: baseball at normal parks and baseball at Fenway, half the time at each. Our situation guarantees that we will have a good record but almost never the best.

    There has been a lot of debate and nostalgia for the Green Monster, but maybe it is time to give the dedicated players and fans a chance to play the same sport as everybody else — and level the playing field.

    YANEER BAR-YAM
    Cambridge, Mass., Oct. 17, 2003

    To the Editor:

    Re "Old Hero, and Newest, Carry New York to the Series" (front page, Oct. 17): I'd like to congratulate George Steinbrenner for buying yet another championship.

    ANDREW TUTTLE
    La Habra, Calif., Oct. 17, 2003


    Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

  15. #45

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    October 18, 2003

    Its High Hopes Dashed, Boston Reels as the Archenemy Triumphs Again

    By PAM BELLUCK

    BOSTON, Oct. 17 — Could it have been any worse?

    Blowing a four-run lead to lose in extra innings in Game 7. Coming so close to winning, only to be flattened, once again, by the archenemy, the New York Yankees.

    Red Sox fans seemed in a state of asphyxiated shock on Friday, the wind sucked out of them when the Yankees crushed their World Series ambitions yet again.

    John Huyler had come into Boston from his home in Plymouth to watch the game on Thursday night with friends at a downtown bar.

    For much of the game, "everyone was on cloud nine," Mr. Huyler, 28, a reactor operator at the Pilgrim Nuclear Station, said. "We were going to the World Series. We were going to play the Marlins, and we knew we had a good chance of beating them. Then someone let the air out of the place. I looked around the bar, and everyone had the same zombie look on their face, like it can't happen again."

    When it was over, Mr. Huyler said he could not even cry.

    "I was so spent emotionally that I didn't have any emotions left," he said. "At the end, we just kind of sat there with our hands on our hats and looked down at the table."

    Sure, Red Sox fans are used to losing. They are even used to late-season roller coasters, the rush of thinking that the team might have a fighting chance, followed by the trough of disappointment when their team falls short.

    But this year was different.

    "I think there was more optimism about this team among fans than there has been in a long time," said Glenn Stout, a baseball historian who was a co-author of "Red Sox Century" (Houghton Mifflin). "There was new ownership, what a lot of people thought was a new approach. They fell for them, you know."

    Mr. Stout said the team this year had enthralled a new generation of fans in a city that had not come so close to the ultimate prize since the calamitous loss of the 1986 World Series. He said he expected that many fans would now distance themselves a little from the team.

    "I know people who, after 1986, they still pay attention, but they don't follow, they don't fall in love with the team any more," he said. "They watch them from afar. Many fans will keep some of their emotions in check: `I'm not going to get hurt that bad again.' "

    Several fans milled around Fenway Park on Friday, glazed expressions on their faces.

    "I needed one more walk around the ballpark," Scott McCauley, 31, of Portsmouth, N.H., said.

    Mr. McCauley saw a parallel between the Red Sox and romance.

    "It's like the hot chick that dumps you," he said. "It breaks your heart, but it's fun to go out with the hot chick. So you go for as long as you can, but you know you're going to get dumped in the end."

    Many fans bemoaned the decision to keep Pedro Martinez on the pitcher's mound too long.

    "We're somewhere between sad and mad," said Paula Mullen, 52, principal of Galvin Middle School in Wakefield, who was taking sixth graders on a tour of Fenway Park.

    Jay Cabral, who had spent the season working at a Red Sox souvenir store and attended every home game, could barely coax more than a whisper from his voice as he stood at a poster board with pictures of the team that someone had propped in front of Gate B.

    "I dedicated the last year of my life to the Red Sox," Mr. Cabral, 26, said as he touched a picture of Mr. Martinez on the poster, as if to steady his nerves. "And this is not the way I wrote it."


    Red Sox Cursed Themselves

    By HARVEY ARATON

    HAWTHORNE, N.Y.


    Fans stopped at Babe Ruth's grave to thank him for the Yankees' victory.

    JIM DIODATI, 23, drove up from Yonkers to hang his red college baseball socks on an overhanging bush. John Traynor, 31, jumped out of bed on a few hours' sleep, on the morning before his bachelor party, to lay a bouquet of flowers with a card that said, "Dear Babe, thanks again."

    Someone left the stub of a ticket from Game 7 on Thursday night. A ball with the inscription, "Let the curse live on," nestled by the base of the headstone. The New York City tabloids, with their caustic and celebratory headlines, were spread about. The Westchester County Fife and Drum Corps came to play "God Bless America."

    Gratitude flowed like Champagne in a pennant winner's clubhouse yesterday at the Gate of Heaven Cemetery, where Babe Ruth shed about as much light on the latest crushing Red Sox defeat as Manager Grady Little did after his team was confirmed dead early yesterday. By daybreak, Yankees fans were streaming off the parkways in quiet northern Westchester to pay their respects to the man they were more convinced than ever had catered another funeral postgame spread for Boston from his final resting place.

    On those familiar Ruthian subjects of consumption and curses, all we really knew was that the piping hot pizza delivered to the gravesite the previous afternoon went uneaten and turned colder than Boston Common on the cruel morning after, before being carted away. "Someone actually sent him a pie," Bill Lane, the cemetery's assistant superintendent, said while on the lookout for those who might view this shrine the way Pedro Martínez eyed Karim Garcia, as a convenient and juicy target.

    People wouldn't carry this silly curse thing that far, you say? Andrew Nagle, the director of the sprawling cemetery, told me that security personnel recently had to eject some who had shown up to get drunk and messy. Put it this way: If a live man can be under siege for allegedly interfering with the outcome of a ballgame in Chicago, why not a dead one in the New York suburbs?

    Though Babe's ghost wasn't giving interviews, brushing me off like a spoiled Red Sox star, I have my doubts he intervened in the game that sent the Yankees to another World Series starting tonight against the Florida Marlins, and sent the Red Sox home to lick their wounds and scrape the Series insignia off the Fenway Park grass.

    I don't believe Ruth ever put a curse on the Red Sox, or even carried a grudge. Harry Frazee did Ruth a huge favor when he sold him and sent him from provincial Boston to a grander and more ambitious stage. Frazee, Lane said, happens to be buried in a cemetery near the Gate of Heaven, meaning Frazee and the Babe are spiritually coexisting in the same county. They might have even watched Game 7 together, for all we know rooting for the Red Sox.

    Remember this: It wasn't the Red Sox who squeezed the life out of Ruth's career, rejected his overtures to manage and then cast him off, a dispirited Bambino.

    In an altogether different world, the Yankees of then apparently had the same unsentimental operating mentality as their owner does now: We pay, you produce. As difficult as George Steinbrenner can be to stomach, what his organization does have, unlike Boston's, is an orderly chain of command. His stars don't make out the lineup card or call the managerial moves. They don't run the asylum.

    In his make-or-break game, Joe Torre could drop his $120 million slugger, Jason Giambi, four spots in the lineup and, far from sulking, get two solo home runs. He could bench Aaron Boone, the organization's major in-season acquisition, and still have Boone thrilled with the opportunity to take one heroic swing. Torre could tell Mariano Rivera that he had gone far enough, no matter what Rivera wanted, and take responsibility if that strategy failed.

    Grady Little, conversely, surrendered the most important decision of his managerial career to Martínez, his overworked ace who was in the midst of the most emotional and controversial week of his professional life.

    Little should have removed Martínez, saved him from his own competitive conceit. That's what he did in Game 5 of the division series in Oakland. Little's bullpen pulled him through, all the way to Game 7 Thursday night.

    Don't blame Little, though. He didn't put himself in the low-leveraged position of working without a job guarantee for next season. How prudent is it for an organization to spend in excess of $100 million for talent and put it in the hands of a man reportedly working for a half-million, paltry by today's standards? What does that communicate to the players and particularly the stars, who in Boston have historically been coddled and have done as they pleased?

    Was Game 7 the continuation of a curse, an outright choke or a result brought about by contrasting cultures? My guess is that Little was influenced by the burden of past blowups from Boston bullpens, after Derek Jeter and Bernie Williams, ringleaders representing four championship Yankee teams, signaled the eighth-inning charge.

    Call it what you wish, but whatever haunts the Red Sox, it is, by now, largely self-imposed.


    Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

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